U.K. Twitter Users' Favorite Olympic Moments [INFOGRAPHIC]

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U.K. Twitter Users' Favorite Olympic Moments [INFOGRAPHIC]
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Which Olympic moments and events made Twitter users in the U.K. smile most?

Heptathlete Jessica Ennis, tennis star Andy Murray and distance runner Mo Farah all brought loads of joy to their fellow countrymen during the Games, according to new data from the utility company EDF Energy.

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You may have heard of EDF Energy -- they're also the folks who turned the iconic London Eye ferris wheel into a nightly light show reflecting social media sentiment during the Olympics. The company enlisted social media experts, linguistics analysts and algorithms to keep a finger on Britons' digital pulse during the games. Their findings over the past two weeks are presented in the infographic below.

Overall, Twitter users in the U.K. registered a "positivity reading" of 64% during the Games, meaning more than six in 10 tweets expressed positive feelings, reactions and emotions. That number jumped to 90%, though, when Ennis took the heptathlon gold, and 82% twice -- first when Murray won the the tennis gold, and again when brothers Alistair and Jonny Brownlee took the triathlon gold and bronze medals, respectively. Farah pushed the positivity meter up to 76% when he won the 5,000 meter race on Aug. 11.

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Britons' biggest buzzkill? National positivity fell from 86% to 71% when native daughters Victoria Pendleton and Jess Varnish were disqualified from the women's team sprint on Aug. 2.

Twitter users in the U.K. were most active during the July 27 opening ceremony, posting more than 47,000 tweets per hour. During Sunday's closing ceremony, they posted just over 46,000 tweets per hour, according to EDF Energy. Worldwide, the Olympics generated 150 million total tweets.

Check out the full infographic below to see how the mood of Twitter users in the U.K. shifted over the past two weeks.

This story originally published on Mashable here.

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