Virginia's Proposed Abortion Bill Gets an Interesting Amendment

Yahoo Contributor Network

COMMENTARY | A report from the UPI says Virginia is poised to pass an abortion bill requiring women facing the difficult decision of abortion to be further compounded with guilt by requiring a sonogram to throw the age of the fetus in their faces. Such cruelty is only imaginable in the minds of religious extremists. In addition, the bill requires the patient to pay for the sonogram, adding further expense to the procedure.

According to NBC29.com, Democrat State Senator Janet Howell calls the proposed bill "emotional blackmail," and perhaps she's right. Federal law allows women the right to choose whether to bear a pregnancy or not, and Virginia's proposed bill would only be a way to circumnavigate the law for the interests of a few politician's personal religious beliefs.

So, in the interest of gender equality, State Senator Janet Hill has proposed an amendment that should get the attention of any patriarch. According to ThinkProgress.org, the Democrat senator wants to add an amendment requiring men in Virginia who want a prescription for Viagra to first undergo a digital rectal exam as well as a cardiac stress test.

She's quoted as saying, "If pregnant women should have to get an ultrasound before having an abortion, men should have to undergo additional medical procedures before getting a prescription for erectile dysfunction."

Fair is fair, after all. If a woman facing a difficult decision such as abortion -- a decision that should be left between her and her doctor and no one else -- then it's only fair for men in the state to be required to face the same level of intrusion into their private medical decisions.

If the state has some sort of innate right to show concern over a woman's decision to have an abortion, then that same state should also have the same right to be concerned for a man's health too.

Odds are good the men in Virginia will not like the thought of a digital rectal exam requirement for a Viagra prescription. But the possibility of their erectile dysfunction being linked somehow to prostate problems -- as well as the concerns for their heart health -- are actually more valid than some politician's personal ethical concerns over abortion. It's actually a reasonable amendment to add to Virginia's proposed abortion bill.

View Comments (4)