White House asks House not to undercut NSA program

Associated Press
FILE - In this July 18, 2013 file photo, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, appears before the Senate Armed Services Committee for a hearing to consider his reappointment to the military's highest post, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Establishing a no-fly zone to protect Syrian rebels would require hundreds of U.S. aircraft at a cost of upward of $1 billion per month and no assurance that it would change the momentum in the 2-year-old civil war, Dempsey said Monday in a cautionary assessment of more aggressive American military action. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
.

View photo

FILE - In this July 18, 2013 file photo, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, appears before the Senate Armed Services Committee for a hearing to consider his reappointment to the military's highest post, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Establishing a no-fly zone to protect Syrian rebels would require hundreds of U.S. aircraft at a cost of upward of $1 billion per month and no assurance that it would change the momentum in the 2-year-old civil war, Dempsey said Monday in a cautionary assessment of more aggressive American military action. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is urging lawmakers in the House to reject legislation that would undercut the National Security Agency's ability to collect phone records of millions of Americans.

The House is likely to vote Wednesday on an amendment to a defense spending bill that would end the NSA's authority under the Patriot Act, preventing the agency from collecting records unless an individual is under investigation.

White House spokesman Jay Carney says the Obama administration welcomes an ongoing debate on privacy and national security. But he says the House measure would hastily dismantle a counterterrorism tool. He says it's a blunt approach that didn't result from an informed or open process.

Carney says the administration prefers an approach that reviews what tools can best secure the U.S.

View Comments (38)