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$1,400 stimulus payments begin to process, deep partisan split in Washington over relief plan

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$1,400 stimulus payments for individuals are showing up in bank accounts this Saturday. While President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan has the support of most Americans, no Republicans in the closely-divided Congress voted in favor of the bill, underscoring the deep partisan split in Washington. Christina Ruffini reports.

Video Transcript

- The newly signed American Rescue Plan being put into action. President Biden signed the $1.9 trillion COVID relief package into law on Thursday, and the legislative victory for the president is already being felt by some Americans. Stimulus payments of up to $1,400 for individuals are showing up in bank accounts this morning, while the plan has the support of the majority of Americans. No Republicans in the closely divided Congress voted in favor of the bill, underscoring the deep partisan split in Washington.

Christina Ruffini is our Washington-- is in our Washington newsroom. Christina, good morning.

CHRISTINA RUFFINI: Good morning, Michelle. This is the largest federal aid package passed in generations, aimed at helping struggling Americans with a much-needed infusion of cash, or actually checks, direct deposits, or in some cases, it will come from a prepaid debit card. And that money has already started showing up in statements over the weekend. Or as one service industry friend posted on his Facebook yesterday, "Just got my stimulus check. Woohoo."

Flying high on his legislative victory, President Biden went wheels up for a weekend away at his home in Wilmington, but not before taking a victory lap in the White House Rose Garden--

JOE BIDEN: This bill puts working people in this nation first.

CHRISTINA RUFFINI: --surrounded by state flags and a selection of socially distanced Democrats, who helped push the $1.9 trillion behemoth of a bill through Congress without Republican support.

JOE BIDEN: I know how hard it is to pass major consequential legislation, particularly when we only have such minor small majorities in both houses.

CHRISTINA RUFFINI: Republicans disagree, calling the bill wasteful and its spending too broad.

- This wasn't a bill to finish off the pandemic. It was a multitrillion-dollar Trojan horse full of bad old liberal ideas.

CHRISTINA RUFFINI: Despite the criticism, a CBS News YouGov poll found most Americans support the COVID relief bill. In addition to those $1,400 direct payments, it extends federal unemployment benefits, provides funds to reopen schools, and allocates billions for vaccine production and distribution, which President Biden said is ahead of schedule.

JOE BIDEN: All adult Americans will be eligible to get a vaccine no later than May 1.

CHRISTINA RUFFINI: But in order to make that happen, governors on both sides of the aisle said they will need better supply chains and many, many more doses.

- I think getting to the president's objective is absolutely doable, but it's going to require a significant increase in available supply.

CHRISTINA RUFFINI: Now, next week, President Biden and Vice President Harris will head out on a campaign to different cities across America to tell people what exactly is in the bill and how they say it's going to help get the country back on track. Jeff.

- Christina, thank you very much.