10 Things to Know for Today

The Associated Press
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CORRECTION Virus Outbreak Argentina

CORRECTS TO REMOVE THIRD SENTENCE STATING THEY PROVIDE FREE MASKS TO NEEDY AS WELL - Joana Maciel holds up a protective face mask that she made, as she stands inside her home on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, March 25, 2020. Maciel together with other women who volunteer at a nearby soup kitchen, make the face masks to use as a precaution against the spread of the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. MORE THAN HALF A MILLION INFECTIONS GLOBALLY The U.S. passes China with more than 85,000 coronavirus cases as Italy shut most of its industry and throngs of Indian day laborers received food rations after a nationwide lockdown.

2. FALSE BELIEF PROVES DEADLY IN IRAN Nearly 300 Iranians have been killed and more than 1,000 sickened by ingesting toxic methanol out of the misconception it kills the new coronavirus.

3. WHERE SCIENTISTS ARE SKEPTICAL Experts are challenging the accuracy of simple pin-prick blood tests or nasal swabs that can determine within minutes if someone has, or previously had, COVID-19.

4. VIRAL ENDGAME LEAVES EVERYONE GUESSING Public health experts caution that it would be reckless to lift restrictions before infections have peaked and begun to ebb, but also waiting months or years for a vaccine is not plausible either.

5. WHO MIGHT DELAY STIMULUS VOTE Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., an opponent of the $2.2 trillion economic relief bill, may seek to force a roll call vote, forcing Democratic leaders to summon members back to Washington.

6. 'TOO MANY PEOPLE ARE DYING ALONE' Dr. Kamini Doobay, an emergency medicine physician in New York, says many critically ill patients are not with loved ones due to a strict no visitors’ policy.

7. VIRUS PUTS STRAIN ON COUPLES It's a time when every domestic decision can seem to have impossibly high stakes, from going to the grocery store to deciding who gets quarantined together.

8. ‘I WAS AFRAID BUT I DIDN’T HESITATE’ Malak el-Kashif is perhaps Egypt’s most outspoken transgender woman activist, a label that in a largely conservative and patriarchal society has meant battling a war on multiple fronts.

9. R KELLY CITES VIRUS CONCERNS IN SEEKING JAIL RELEASE Lawyers for the R&B singer say hand sanitizer and soap are hard to come by in Chicago’s Metropolitan Correctional Center and social distancing nearly impossible.

10. HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS GREAT DIES “Curly” Neal, the dribbling wizard who entertained millions of fans for parts of three decades, is dead at 77.

  • Pelosi: Trump's downplaying of coronavirus has cost American lives
    Yahoo News

    Pelosi: Trump's downplaying of coronavirus has cost American lives

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sharpened her criticism of President Trump's early dismissal of the coronavirus, saying the delay cost American lives. His denial at the beginning was deadly,” said Pelosi to open her interview with CNN's Jake Tapper. His delaying of getting equipment — it continues — his delaying of getting equipment to where it is needed is deadly, and now I think the best thing is to prevent more loss of life rather than open things up because we just don't know.

  • 'I know without any doubt that I'm going to lose colleagues': New York hospital workers at the front line describe the stark reality of their working conditions, comparing facilities to a 'petri dish'
    Business Insider

    'I know without any doubt that I'm going to lose colleagues': New York hospital workers at the front line describe the stark reality of their working conditions, comparing facilities to a 'petri dish'

    Hospital workers in New York — the epicenter of the US coronavirus outbreak — describe the stark reality of treating patients amid a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE). One doctor described working conditions like a "petri dish" as coronavirus patients flood hospital hallways, The New York Times reported. As of March 30, the coronavirus has infected at least 67,384 people in New York, and the death toll in the state has surpassed 2,700.

  • Indian police fire tear gas at jobless workers defying coronavirus lockdown
    Reuters

    Indian police fire tear gas at jobless workers defying coronavirus lockdown

    Police in India fired tear gas to disperse a stone-pelting crowd of migrant workers defying a three-week lockdown against the coronavirus that has left hundreds of thousands of poor without jobs and hungry, authorities said on Monday. Prime Minister Narendra Modi ordered the country's 1.3 billion people to remain indoors until April 15, declaring such self-isolation was the only hope to stop the viral pandemic. But the vast shutdown has triggered a humanitarian crisis, with hundreds of thousands of poor migrant laborers employed in big cities such as Delhi and Mumbai seeking to head to their homes in the countryside on foot after losing their jobs.

  • Police commander killed, 2 officers wounded in Phoenix shooting
    USA TODAY

    Police commander killed, 2 officers wounded in Phoenix shooting

    PHOENIX – A 31-year Phoenix police veteran was killed and two other officers were injured when a man opened fire on them during a call about a disturbance between roommates in northwest Phoenix Sunday night, authorities said. Commander Greg Carnicle has died after being shot, police said. The shooting drew a massive police response at the scene, with dozens of police vehicles and tactical trucks.

  • Dr. Birx predicts up to 200,000 coronavirus deaths 'if we do things almost perfectly'
    NBC News

    Dr. Birx predicts up to 200,000 coronavirus deaths 'if we do things almost perfectly'

    The White House coronavirus response coordinator said Monday that she is "very worried about every city in the United States" and projects 100,000 to 200,000 American deaths as a best case scenario. In an interview on "TODAY," Dr. Deborah Birx painted a grim message about the expected fatalities, echoing that they could hit more than 2 million without any measures, as coronavirus cases continue to climb throughout the country. "I think everyone understands now that you can go from five to 50 to 500 to 5,000 cases very quickly," Birx said.

  • Fit, healthy 33-year-old recounts falling ill to coronavirus
    Associated Press

    Fit, healthy 33-year-old recounts falling ill to coronavirus

    Still, Napoli, a lawyer in Rome, developed a cough and fever less than a week after Italy's premier locked down the entire nation, including the capital which had continued life as usual while the virus raged in the north. Until that day, Napoli was following his routine of work, jogging and swimming. He received a positive diagnosis for COVID-19 three days later.

  • Bloomberg

    China to Reveal a Key Virus Data Point: People With No Symptoms

    China's government indicated it will start releasing data on how many people are infected with coronavirus but don't have symptoms, seemingly responding to a growing chorus of domestic and international criticism of China's data on the outbreak. Local governments should emphasize their ongoing efforts to monitor, track, isolate and treat cases of so-called “asymptomatic infection,” a meeting on Covid-19 led by Premier Li Keqiang said Monday. Doing so will reduce loopholes in epidemic control work, according to the statement which was released on the website of the State Council, the top administrative body in China.

  • New Zealand, a country of about 5 million, has 18 million masks in its reserves, with 80,000 being made every day
    INSIDER

    New Zealand, a country of about 5 million, has 18 million masks in its reserves, with 80,000 being made every day

    In a post on Instagram on Friday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said New Zealand had 18 million masks in reserve, with 80,000 more being made a day. It's not clear how many of these are surgical masks, as opposed to the more effective N95 respirators. The US, which has just under 330 million people, has a national stockpile has about 12 million N95 masks and 30 million surgical masks.

  • The U.S. is preparing for a medical supply airlift of unprecedented scale
    The Week

    The U.S. is preparing for a medical supply airlift of unprecedented scale

    As hospitals across the United States face a shortage of medical supplies in the face of the novel coronavirus pandemic, planes are gearing up to bring in reinforcements. The first aircraft in a series of flights scheduled by the White House over the next 30 days arrived in New York from Shanghai on Sunday morning, bringing with it 12 million gloves, 130,000 N95 masks, 17.6 surgical masks, 50,000 gowns, 130,000 hand sanitizer units, and 36,000 thermometers, all of which will be distributed throughout the New York tri-state area. A non-government distributor had actually already bought the supplies and planned to sell them in New York, but they'd normally arrive on ships.

  • 29 Best Closet Organization Ideas to Maximize Space and Style
    Architectural Digest

    29 Best Closet Organization Ideas to Maximize Space and Style

    How to organize your closet like a pro Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Trump says Democrats' push for expanded voting threatens Republicans
    Yahoo News

    Trump says Democrats' push for expanded voting threatens Republicans

    President Trump on Monday criticized attempts by Democrats in Congress to expand voting access for the presidential election in the fall, saying increased voter turnout would keep Republicans from getting elected. Trump said that Democrat-proposed voting reforms to the $2.2 trillion rescue package passed last week by Congress — which were largely cut from the deal — would have led to “levels of voting, that if you ever agreed to it you'd never have a Republican elected in this country again.” Democrats have pushed to mandate that states make plans to expand early voting and mail-in balloting for the fall election, in the event that the coronavirus pandemic makes in-person voting unsafe.

  • No scandal here: Mexico president defends meeting mother of drug lord 'El Chapo'
    Reuters

    No scandal here: Mexico president defends meeting mother of drug lord 'El Chapo'

    MEXICO CITY/BADIRAGUATO, Mexico (Reuters) - Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on Monday defended his weekend handshake with the mother of drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, calling her a "respectable old lady" and seeking to cast his critics as the principal menace to the country. In a 30-second video posted on Twitter on Sunday, Lopez Obrador could be seen approaching Maria Consuelo Loera's car, parked on a dirt road on the outskirts of Badiraguato, a mountainous municipality in the northwestern state of Sinaloa. Surrounded by onlookers, Lopez Obrador told Loera she need not get out of the car, they shook hands and after a brief exchange he told her he had "received her letter."

  • After more than 10,000 coronavirus deaths — the worst in the world — Italy is showing signs that its 3-week lockdown is working
    Business Insider

    After more than 10,000 coronavirus deaths — the worst in the world — Italy is showing signs that its 3-week lockdown is working

    Remo Casilli/Reuters Italy is showing very early signs that it's turning a corner with the coronavirus outbreak as the numbers of new reported deaths and cases have slowed, according to multiple reports. The country's strict three-week lockdown is due to be lifted on Friday, but officials have said it's likely to be extended. It's a sign that those under lockdown "save lives" by staying home, Luca Richeldi, a government health adviser, said on Sunday.

  • U.S. set to lose title as top oil producer as demand plunges and gas drops below $1 per gallon
    NBC News

    U.S. set to lose title as top oil producer as demand plunges and gas drops below $1 per gallon

    The oil market is in free fall, with one benchmark price hovering around $20 a barrel, and the national average price of gas dipping below $2 a gallon — a 16-year low. “We're going to see a major decline in U.S. production,” he said. This will do significant, and probably lasting, damage to the American oil industry, which has grown in recent years due to an increase in shale extraction, making the U.S. the world's top oil producer.

  • Associated Press

    Europe's trade system with Iran finally makes first deal

    European countries trying to keep Iran's nuclear deal with world powers alive said Tuesday that a system they set up to enable trade with Tehran has finally concluded its first transaction, facilitating the export of medical goods. Britain, France and Germany conceived the complex barter-type system dubbed INSTEX, which aims to protect companies doing business with Iran from American sanctions, in January 2019. The move came months after President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew the United States from the nuclear deal that Tehran struck with world powers in 2015 and reimposed sanctions.

  • Bloomberg

    China Clashes at Virus Epicenter Show Risks Facing Xi Jinping

    China's leaders normally spend a lot of time and money on keeping the country's 1.4 billion people in line -- and that was before a global pandemic ravaging the world economy threatened to put millions out of work. A rare street clash over the weekend on the border of virus-stricken Hubei province shows the challenges President Xi Jinping faces as China looks to get its economy moving again after appearing to gets its Covid-19 outbreak under control. Hubei is only now emerging from a two-month lockdown that helped limit the virus's spread to other parts of China.

  • 'I don't know what he's trying to say': Cuomo on Trump's accusation that medical PPE is being stolen by health workers
    Yahoo News Video

    'I don't know what he's trying to say': Cuomo on Trump's accusation that medical PPE is being stolen by health workers

    At a coronavirus press briefing, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he didn't know what President Trump was talking about with regard to his accusation that medical personnel were stealing personal protective equipment.

  • The coronavirus is spreading quickly through Israel's ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities
    The Week

    The coronavirus is spreading quickly through Israel's ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities

    In Israel, the coronavirus is spreading in ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities up to eight times faster than anywhere else in the country. Ultra-Orthodox Jews account for 12 percent of Israel's population, but they make up 40 to 60 percent of coronavirus patients at four of the country's largest hospitals, officials told Israeli media. Health experts said the virus is moving so quickly in these communities because the ultra-Orthodox have large families, don't trust the government, and pay little to no attention to secular media.

  • Open coffins are left on roads to remind people to stay inside while soldiers shoot disinfectant from water cannons. Here's what lockdown for 57 million people in the Philippines looks like.
    INSIDER

    Open coffins are left on roads to remind people to stay inside while soldiers shoot disinfectant from water cannons. Here's what lockdown for 57 million people in the Philippines looks like.

    Ezra Acayan/Getty The Philippines' main island Luzon, which has a population of more than 57 million, is on lockdown. Along with people's movements being restricted, soldiers are covering residents and the streets in disinfectant, and open coffins have been left on the roads as a warning to people to stay inside. On Sunday, the Philippines reported 343 new coronavirus cases in a day — its highest one day increase yet.

  • Singapore gay sex ban: Court rejects appeals to overturn law
    BBC

    Singapore gay sex ban: Court rejects appeals to overturn law

    A bid to overturn a law that criminalises gay sex in Singapore has been dismissed by a court, dealing a blow to the city state's LGBT movement. The presiding judge said the law was "important in reflecting public sentiment and beliefs" in Singapore. Under Section 377A, men found guilty of homosexual acts in public or private can be jailed for up to two years.

  • Trump accuses hospitals of hoarding ventilators
    Reuters

    Trump accuses hospitals of hoarding ventilators

    U.S. President Donald Trump accused hospitals on Sunday of hoarding ventilators that are in scarce supply across the United States as the coronavirus spreads, adding any hospitals not using the devices must release them. Trump, whose critics have accused him of trying to deflect blame over his handling of the crisis, did not cite any evidence to back his accusation that hospitals were hoarding the devices. "We have some healthcare workers, some hospitals ... hoarding equipment including ventilators," Trump said at the White House following a meeting with corporate executives, including from U.S. Medical Group.

  • The US passed a grim milestone with a single-day coronavirus death toll above 500, bringing the country's overall count past 3,000
    Business Insider

    The US passed a grim milestone with a single-day coronavirus death toll above 500, bringing the country's overall count past 3,000

    More than 3,000 people had died of the novel coronavirus in the US as of Monday night after a single-day death toll of more than 500. Previously, the highest death toll in 24 hours was 446 deaths, according to The Washington Post. The top US infectious-disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, told CNN the country could see "millions of cases" as the outbreak pans out, with 100,000 to 200,000 deaths.

  • Fact check: will Covid-19 fade in the summer – then return later like the flu?
    The Guardian

    Fact check: will Covid-19 fade in the summer – then return later like the flu?

    Dr Marc Lipsitch: What makes seasonal viruses seasonal is a combination of opportunities for transmission – whether school is in term, which facilitates transmission – and what proportion of the population is immune, combined with weather. Humidity is lower in the winter, which is good for transmission. Low humidity makes [virus-carrying] droplets settle more slowly because they shrink to smaller sizes and then friction keeps them in the air, whereas high humidity doesn't do that.

  • Associated Press

    Idaho governor signs into law anti-transgender legislation

    Idaho Gov. Brad Little on Monday signed into law two anti-transgender bills, making Idaho the first among states that introduced some 40 such bills this year to enact them. The Republican governor approved legislation that prohibits transgender people from changing the sex listed on their birth certificates, and another that bans transgender girls and women from competing in women's sports. The birth certificate measure ignores a 2018 federal court ruling that a past law barring transgender people from making the birth certificate changes violated the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

  • A coronavirus-stricken cruise ship is approaching Florida. Will it be allowed to dock?
    NBC News

    A coronavirus-stricken cruise ship is approaching Florida. Will it be allowed to dock?

    As the Zaandam cruise ship travels toward Florida with four dead passengers and 179 others with flu-like symptoms, Gov. Ron DeSantis insisted Monday that the passengers cannot be "dumped" in his state. "We cannot afford to have people who are not even Floridians dumped into South Florida using up those valuable resources," DeSantis said on Fox News. "We view this as a big, big problem, and we do not want to see people dumped in Southern Florida right now."