This 1969 Plymouth Road Runner Is Pure American Muscle

Amie Williams

A no-frills performance machine

Silverstone Motorcars is pleased to offer this 1969 Plymouth Road Runner ready to unleash all eight cylinders in the hands of a new owner. The odometer reads 42,842 miles which isn't a ton of miles for a 50-year-old car, but enough to know that this baby isn't scared of the road.

This 1969 Plymouth Road Runner Is Pure American Muscle

A powerhouse back in its day, the 1969 Plymouth Road Runner was a popular car for running moonshine because it was capable of outrunning most police cars of that era. The Road Runner was a no frills and all thrills performance machine. It's the perfect car for anyone who prefers the symphonic rumble of a V8 motor and exhaust over any radio station. 

The Road Runner was built on the B-Body Mopar platform, and it was shared with the Belvedere, Satellite, and GTX. Plymouth paid $50,000 to use the rights to the Road Runner name, and that includes the use of the “beep-beep” horn and Road Runner cartoon insignia. Built as a budget-friendly powerhouse, Plymouth’s main goal for the Road Runner was to build a fast car that dominates the quarter mile in the 13-second range. In addition, it needed to be affordable and sell for under $4,000.

Powering this muscle car is a numbers-matching 383 cui V8 mated to a 4-speed manual transmission that generates a healthy 335-horsepower. The exterior is painted in bright orange with contrasting black stipes and a black vinyl roof, and the inside features black vinyl bucket seats up front and a large rear bench in the back.

The current owner has possessed the car for over 20 years and is only selling because the car just doesn’t get driven enough. Originally a Florida car, this old-school muscle car has since been kept indoors and well-maintained. This vintage muscle car comes with a clear title. If in the market for pure American performance, you can make an offer here.

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