2 migrants flown to Martha's Vineyard by Gov. DeSantis have already left for NYC, says Massachusetts lawmaker

·2 min read
A Venezuelan migrant, waves to volunteers before boarding a bus to the Vineyard Haven ferry terminal outside of St. Andrew's Parish House in Martha's Vineyard on September 16.
A Venezuelan migrant, waves to volunteers before boarding a bus to the Vineyard Haven ferry terminal outside of St. Andrew's Parish House in Martha's Vineyard on September 16.Carlin Stiehl for The Boston Globe via Getty Images
  • Two of the migrants flown to Martha's Vineyard have left for NYC, a local politician told Insider.

  • The lawmaker said he wouldn't be surprised if more of the migrants left for other parts of the US.

  • Some of them, said Massachusetts State Sen. Julian Cyr, even want to return to Martha's Vineyard.

Two of the dozens of migrants who were flown to the Massachusetts island of Martha's Vineyard by Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis have already left the state for New York City, a local lawmaker told Insider on Wednesday.

Massachusetts State Sen. Julian Cyr said the pair, who he described as relatives, took a bus from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to New York City, where other family members of theirs live.

The two men were among the 49 mostly Venezuelan migrants who DeSantis had taken on two chartered planes to the upscale liberal enclave from Texas last week.

All 49 of the immigrants were later relocated to a military base in Cape Cod that's designated as an emergency shelter.

Cyr, who represents Martha's Vineyard, told Insider that he would not be "surprised" if more of the migrants would soon leave the base to "reunite" with family or friends in other parts of the country.

"I think you're going to see a lot of people" resettle elsewhere, Cyr said. "I think they're trying to cobble together their lives and figure out a plan."

Cyr, a Democrat, said that some of the migrants even want to return to Martha's Vineyard.

"They loved Martha's Vineyard," the politician said of the migrants. "And I think will be welcomed heartily by islanders."

A group of the migrants on Tuesday filed a federal class action suit against DeSantis and other Florida officials, alleging they carried out a "scheme to defraud vulnerable immigrants to advance a political motive."

Lawyers representing a majority of the migrants have called on state and federal prosecutors to open a criminal probe into what they have called a "shameful political stunt."

Cyr said that one of the migrants told him that although he "felt tricked and manipulated" by being taken to the vacation island, he was "so grateful" to wind up in Massachusetts.

"I think many plan to stay now in Massachusetts and settle in greater Boston or to settle in Cape Cod," said Cyr.

The asylum-seeking migrants were in pursuit of a "better life" in the United States when they found themselves caught in the middle of a political firestorm, Cyr said.

Read the original article on Business Insider