This $60 heated neck massager has over 7,000 5-star reviews

Katie Dupere

Our team is dedicated to finding and telling you more about the products and deals we love. If you love them too and decide to purchase through the links below, we may receive a commission. Pricing and availability are subject to change.

If you have neck and back pain — and truly, who doesn’t? — an electric massager probably sounds like a treat. But a $60 heated neck and back massager with more than 7,000 5-star reviews probably sounds like a total steal. That’s because it is.

Resteck’s Shiatsu Neck and Back Massager is one of Amazon’s top-rated massaging products, boasting 4.8 stars and more than 8,175 reviews. The rechargeable massager promises to “ease neck stiffness, eliminate constant fatigue, soothe aching muscles and promote proper blood circulation.”

A heated mode adds to the soothing elements, promoting relaxation of stiff muscles. Plus the handles on the massager help you put increased pressure on areas, and focus in on certain areas. The eight massage nodes featured in the device are adjustable in pattern and pressure.

Shop: Resteck Shiatsu Neck and Back Massager, $59.95

Credit: Amazon

While the device was made for neck, shoulders and back massaging, it can also work on your legs, glutes, calves and even your feet. It also comes with a carrying case for your on-the-go massaging needs.

The massager has been reviewed more than 8,000 times on Amazon, and has 4.8 out of 5 stars. Some of the most popular terms in reviews are “highly recommended,” “deep tissue” and “every day.”

One reviewer writes, “After years of chronic neck pain and trying physical therapy, chiropractic, and massage therapy with little lasting benefit, this item finally has me sleeping soundly.”

Another reviewer writes, “I was a little skeptical that a device like this would work for me. However, the reviews were great and it’s less than the cost of just one massage so I thought, why not give it a try? I am more than pleased with my purchase. It looks awkward and it is at first but the design and handles allow you to control the massage area and pressure which is very important. I was able to work on all my problem areas and the rest of my back with ease. I can tell already that this thing is going to save me a ton of money!”

Endless on-demand massages for just $60? Yes, please.

More from In The Know:

This $10 three-minute hair mask will completely change your hair

Sanitize your makeup brushes with this cult-favorite cleaner

This $25 eye cream can help combat puffiness and dark circlesShare

The post This $60 heated neck massager has over 7,000 5-star reviews appeared first on In The Know.

  • New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll: 59 percent of Americans say Trump's Easter timeline is 'too soon' to restart economy
    Yahoo News

    New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll: 59 percent of Americans say Trump's Easter timeline is 'too soon' to restart economy

    A large majority of Americans disagree with President Trump that the nation's battle against the coronavirus is winding down and that normal economic activity should resume sooner rather than later, according to a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll — and that divide appears to be eroding public trust in Trump's leadership during the pandemic. As the virus continues to spread exponentially — the U.S. now leads the world in cases, with more than 85,000 — the poll found that 59 percent of Americans think that Easter, which falls on April 12, is too soon to “open the country up for business,” even though the president has repeatedly said he hopes to do just that.

  • Americans stranded in India fear for their safety and wonder when they can return home
    Yahoo News

    Americans stranded in India fear for their safety and wonder when they can return home

    Firefighter and paramedic Michael Cannon and nurse Rose Barnes told Yahoo News they traveled to New Delhi March 13 on what should have been one of the happiest trips of their life, to bring the two-and-a-half year old girl home with them to Murrieta, Calif. But instead, they faced suspicion from locals and are now stuck in India awaiting news on when they can return home, and whether the child they hoped to welcome into their family can accompany them. India issued its official first day of a nationwide lockdown on March 25, with police enforcing the strict measures on its 1.3 billion people. Prime Minister Narendra Modi said the “total lockdown” was to “save India, to save its citizens, your family.”

  • The coronavirus pandemic is straining hospitals, but many medical school grads can't get jobs
    Yahoo News Video

    The coronavirus pandemic is straining hospitals, but many medical school grads can't get jobs

    The number of medical school graduates is increasing faster than the number of residency slots, thanks in part to a cap on federal funding for residency programs that has been in place for over 20 years. Without securing a residency, medical school graduates cannot go on to become physicians. Some find themselves in their mid-20s with hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt after eight years of higher education, earning a living driving for car services or as baristas.

  • Iran's president says economy is a factor in virus response
    Associated Press

    Iran's president says economy is a factor in virus response

    Iran's president on Sunday lashed out at criticism of its lagging response to the worst coronavirus outbreak in the Middle East, saying the government has to weigh economic concerns as it takes measures to contain the pandemic. Hassan Rouhani said authorities had to consider the effect of mass quarantine efforts on Iran's beleaguered economy, which is under heavy U.S. sanctions. It's a dilemma playing out across the globe, as leaders struggle to strike a balance between restricting human contact and keeping their economies from crashing.

  • German health institute warns pandemic could overstretch system -paper
    Reuters

    German health institute warns pandemic could overstretch system -paper

    Germany's health system could face strains similar to those in Italy if the coronavirus outbreak in the country worsens, the head of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), the federal agency responsible for disease control, told a newspaper. Lothar Wieler's comments came as RKI data on Sunday showed the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Germany had risen to 52,547 and 389 people had died of the disease there. "We cannot rule out that we will have more patients than ventilators in this country ... Of course, we must expect that the capacities will not be sufficient," Wieler told Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

  • Asia virus latest: People return to China epicentre, security talks off
    AFP

    Asia virus latest: People return to China epicentre, security talks off

    Here are the latest developments from Asia related to the novel coronavirus pandemic: - Wuhan eases travel rules - Wuhan, the central Chinese city where the coronavirus first emerged last year, partly reopened on Saturday after more than two months of near total isolation for its population of 11 million. People are now allowed to enter the city but not leave. AFP saw crowds of passengers arriving at Wuhan railway station, most wheeling suitcases alongside them.

  • Stay In the Lines With These Neat Science Coloring Pages
    Popular Mechanics

    Stay In the Lines With These Neat Science Coloring Pages

    No money required—all you need is a printer and some colored pencils. From Popular Mechanics

  • Fact check: Could your December cough actually have been coronavirus? Experts say more research is needed
    USA TODAY

    Fact check: Could your December cough actually have been coronavirus? Experts say more research is needed

    A handful of widely circulated Facebook posts have asserted that people in the United States likely contracted the coronavirus as early as last fall. Many of the posts currently circulating include the profile photo of a Facebook user named Donna Lee Collier. "Our area has had a very virulent 'flu' season with many of my friends testing negative for flu," she said in a Facebook message.

  • Coronavirus Comes to the Kremlin
    The Daily Beast

    Coronavirus Comes to the Kremlin

    Russian media reported that two Kremlin officials may have tested positive for the coronavirus. President Vladimir Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov confirmed he was aware of one of those cases, but claimed no knowledge of the second. State media outlet TASS speculated that one of the infected persons may have been a staffer responsible for awards, who traveled to Spain and later attended Putin's presidential awards ceremony in occupied Crimea.

  • Trump demands appreciation from governors for coronavirus response
    Yahoo News

    Trump demands appreciation from governors for coronavirus response

    President Trump used his daily coronavirus briefing to attack Democratic governors who in his estimation had shown insufficient gratitude for his administration's response to the pandemic. “I want them to be appreciative,” Trump said, arguing that failing to show appreciation was insulting not just to him but to the Army Corps of Engineers, which has been part of the federal response to the pandemic. The president said he has told Vice President Mike Pence not to call governors who haven't shown proper deference to his administration.

  • Woman who coughed on $35K worth of grocery store food faces felony charges
    NBC News

    Woman who coughed on $35K worth of grocery store food faces felony charges

    A woman who played a "twisted prank" at a Pennsylvania grocery store Wednesday by purposely coughing on about $35,000 worth of food that had to be thrown out, was charged with four felonies, including counts of making terrorist threats, police said "Today was a very challenging day," Joe Fasula wrote Wednesday on the Facebook page of the Gerrity's supermarket chain, which he co-owns. "A woman, who the police know to be a chronic problem in the community," walked into the chain's Hanover Township store and "proceeded to purposely cough on our fresh produce, and a small section of our bakery, meat case and grocery," Fasula said.

  • Deadliest Day in Italy, Spain Shows Worst of Virus Not Over
    Bloomberg

    Deadliest Day in Italy, Spain Shows Worst of Virus Not Over

    Both countries are in almost complete lockdown, with their governments counting on limited social interactions to help contain the spread of the disease. Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez convened an emergency cabinet meeting to try to chart a way out of the crisis rapidly engulfing the nation. We may be entering a phase of stabilization, but we haven't reached the peak yet,” Health Minister Salvador Illa said at a news conference in Madrid.

  • Senator says White House turned down emergency coronavirus funding in early February
    Yahoo News

    Senator says White House turned down emergency coronavirus funding in early February

    Sen. Chris Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat, says that Trump administration officials declined an offer of early congressional funding assistance that he and other senators made on Feb. 5 during a meeting to discuss the coronavirus. The officials, including Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, said they “didn't need emergency funding, that they would be able to handle it within existing appropriations,” Murphy recalled in an interview with Yahoo News' “Skullduggery” podcast. “What an awful, horrible catastrophic mistake that was,” Murphy said.

  • Ex-Venezuelan spy chief Carvajal discussing surrender with U.S. authorities: sources
    Reuters

    Ex-Venezuelan spy chief Carvajal discussing surrender with U.S. authorities: sources

    The former head of Venezuela's military intelligence unit, Hugo Carvajal, is discussing his possible surrender with U.S. authorities, three people familiar with the matter said on Saturday, after prosecutors charged him this week with drug trafficking alongside Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. Carvajal, a former general and ally of late Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez, has been in hiding since a Spanish court in November approved his extradition to the United States. It was unclear when or if he would surrender as the people said talks were ongoing.

  • A Wuhan seafood vendor believed to be one of the first coronavirus patients says 'a lot fewer people would have died' if the Chinese government acted sooner
    Business Insider

    A Wuhan seafood vendor believed to be one of the first coronavirus patients says 'a lot fewer people would have died' if the Chinese government acted sooner

    STR/AFP via Getty Images Wei Guixian, a 57-year-old seafood vendor in Wuhan, China, was among the first 27 people to be diagnosed with the coronavirus, which originated from the wet market where she worked. Wei first began exhibiting coronavirus symptoms on December 10 and was admitted to the hospital less than a week later, with doctors describing her illness as "very serious" and "ruthless." Other vendors from the same market began to check into the hospital soon after.

  • New York's coronavirus death toll passes 500, but Cuomo shares some 'good news'
    The Week

    New York's coronavirus death toll passes 500, but Cuomo shares some 'good news'

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) on Friday announced the state's coronavirus death toll has passed 500, but he did have a bit of good news to offer. Cuomo on Friday said 519 people have died from the COVID-19 coronavirus in New York, up from 385 fatalities reported the day before. "That is going to continue to go up, and that is the worst news that I could possibly tell the people of the state of New York," the governor said.

  • China threatens to strike back after Taiwan deal
    Yahoo News Video

    China threatens to strike back after Taiwan deal

    China has denounced a U.S. act that increases American support for Taiwan internationally.

  • Coronavirus: India defiant as millions struggle under lockdown
    BBC

    Coronavirus: India defiant as millions struggle under lockdown

    The Indian government has defended its handling of the coronavirus outbreak after a strict lockdown - introduced with little warning - left millions stranded and without food. The country's response had been "pre-emptive, pro-active and graded", it said in a statement. India's population of 1.3 billion was given less than four hours' notice of the three-week lockdown on Tuesday.

  • CEO of ventilator maker speaks out as Trump invokes Defense Production Act
    NBC News

    CEO of ventilator maker speaks out as Trump invokes Defense Production Act

    The chief executive of a Seattle company partnering with General Motors to produce ventilators says they were already moving forward with plans to roll out the life-saving medical equipment before President Donald Trump decided to invoke the Defense Production Act. "We plan to be producing together over 1,000 units by the end of April and of course with GM's talent and skill, we'll be ramping up to 3,000, 5,000 and 10,000," Ventec Life Systems CEO Chris Kiple said in an exclusive interview with NBC News. Trump on Friday night invoked the rarely-used Korean War-era law to order GM to increase production of ventilators as the country grapples with escalating numbers of COVID-19 cases.

  • 'Merkel is back': virus crisis boosts Germany's centre-right
    AFP

    'Merkel is back': virus crisis boosts Germany's centre-right

    Angela Merkel's long-struggling conservatives have rebounded in the polls thanks to the government's handling of the coronavirus crisis and widespread faith in the outgoing German chancellor's ability to manage the upheaval. Shaking off years of record-low popularity, Merkel's centre-right CDU/CSU bloc is now enjoying approval ratings of around 32 to 35 percent, some six to seven points higher than just a few weeks ago. It's a surprise turn of events for Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU) which as recently as last month was riven by internal turmoil and debate over who would be the party's chancellor candidate when Merkel bows out in 2021.

  • China sends medical aid to Pakistan to combat virus outbreak
    Associated Press

    China sends medical aid to Pakistan to combat virus outbreak

    China sent a plane loaded with medical personnel and supplies Saturday to help Pakistan fight the spread of the coronavirus in one of the world's most populous nations. Across the Middle East and elsewhere, the outbreak has raised concerns that health systems strapped by multiple wars, refugee crises and unstable economies won't be able to handle the growing number of cases. In Iran, which is battling the worst outbreak in the region, state TV said Saturday another 139 people had died from the virus.

  • Bloomberg

    Tom Coburn, GOP ‘Dr. No’ to Senate Democrats, Dies at 72

    Tom Coburn, the physician and Republican senator who became a nemesis to Democrats in the U.S. Congress for 15 years with his hawkish stance on government spending and conservative views on social issues, has died, age 72. The Oklahoman newspaper in Coburn's home state cited a statement from Coburn's family that the former lawmaker died Friday night. The cause of death was prostate cancer.

  • Reuters

    EXCLUSIVE-Ex-Venezuelan general charged with drug trafficking surrenders to DEA -sources

    CARACAS/BOGOTA, March 27 (Reuters) - U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency agents flew to Colombia on Friday to take into custody Cliver Alcala, a retired Venezuelan general indicted for drug trafficking along with Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, two DEA source familiar with the operation told Reuters. Alcala surrendered to the DEA and waived his extradition, after agreeing to collaborate with prosecutors, the DEA sources said. The DEA agents are flying back to the United States with Alcala this evening from the Colombian port city of Barranquilla, where Alcala now lives, the sources said.

  • Without any interventions like social distancing, one model predicts the coronavirus could have killed 40 million people this year
    Business Insider

    Without any interventions like social distancing, one model predicts the coronavirus could have killed 40 million people this year

    Without intense government intervention, the novel coronavirus could infect 7 billion people and kill 40 million this year, according to a new report from researchers at the Imperial College of London. Without implementing strategies like lockdowns to reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus, there would have been 7 billion infections and 40 million deaths in 2020 alone, according to a report published Thursday from researchers at the Imperial College of London. The report, according to co-author Charles Whittaker, is meant to project the impact of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

  • Violent Tornado Rips Through Arkansas Town, Injuries Reported
    The Daily Beast

    Violent Tornado Rips Through Arkansas Town, Injuries Reported

    At least six people were injured after a tornado ripped through downtown Jonesboro, Arkansas on Saturday, ripping entire walls off buildings, flattening homes, and leaving cars overturned. There was no immediate word on fatalities, but videos showed major damage to the area, with only piles of debris apparently left of some buildings. Jonesboro Mayor Harold Perrin issued a 7 p.m. curfew for the entire city as authorities began assessing the damage and conducting search-and-rescue missions throughout the area.