24 movies you need to see that people think are absolutely perfect

kacuna@insider.com (Kirsten Acuna)
Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron star in "Mad Max: Fury Road."

Jasin Boland/Warner Bros.

We've all been there. You're scrolling through Netflix or the television guide trying to find a good movie.

That's where movie fans come in to help. A while back, Reddit user VarrickCarter23 asked the /r/movies subreddit what films they would consider a perfect 10/10 and they received an enormous response.

While some of the films may not shock you — "Toy Story," "There Will Be Blood" — others include great performances you may have overlooked when they were first released in theaters. 

The entire list of responses is pretty lengthy, but we've highlighted 24 in here and included the fans' reasonings as to why you should spend time watching these flicks. We encourage you to check out the full list on Reddit here.

2. "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" (2004)

Kate Winslet and Jim Carrey in "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind."

Focus Features

Synopsis: "When their relationship turns sour, a couple undergoes a procedure to have each other erased from their memories. But it is only through the process of loss that they discover what they had to begin with."

"Almost everything is done flawlessly: The acting is superb, the music is good, the plot is engaging, it's funny, it's unique, it's dramatic, it's depressing, it's lighthearted, it's surprising ... it invokes almost every emotion out of me and it does it with soaring colors, literally." — VarrickCarter23

5. "Fight Club" (1999)

Edward Norton and Brad Pitt in "Fight Club."

Fox 2000 Pictures

Synopsis: "An insomniac office worker, looking for a way to change his life, crosses paths with a devil-may-care soap maker, forming an underground fight club that evolves into something much, much more."

"One of the rare instances where the movie is better than the book. I have gone back and watched it trying to find an error or mistake in it, pertaining to the ending, and I can't find one. Fincher really captures [Chuck] Palahniuk's vision in his adaptation. Both movies stand the test of time." — ff_beer_money

1. "Her" (2013)

Joaquin Phoenix in "Her."

"Her"

Synopsis: "A lonely writer develops an unlikely relationship with an operating system designed to meet his every need."

"I don't consider it one of the best things ever or anything but I think it's a near-flawless piece of film. It just set things up so well that no real plot point would feel forced or out of character. I love the implications, how the year is never specified, or what the rest of the world is like." — VarrickCarter23

3. "The Thing" (1982)

Kurt Russell in "The Thing."

Universal via MovieClips

Synopsis: "A research facility in Antarctica comes across an alien force that can become anything it touches with 100% accuracy. The members must now find out who's human and who's not before it's too late."

"Absolutely perfect horror movie. Interesting premise, awesome characters, incredible special effects, killer soundtrack, perfectly executed tension." — JendoShabo

4. "There Will Be Blood" (2007)

The scene that made everyone think about milkshakes differently.

Miramax via MovieClips

Synopsis: "A story of family, religion, hatred, oil, and madness, focusing on a turn-of-the-century prospector in the early days of the business."

"Single best acting performance in a film for me. He [Daniel Day Lewis] was just mesmerizing. If "No Country for Old Men" was like looking at a beautifully composed nihilistic painting, "There Will Be Blood" was more like being enveloped in a milkshake of dread. Delicious." — bobboooo888

6. "The Incredibles" (2004)

"The Incredibles" sequel is pretty great, too.

Disney / Pixar

Synopsis: "A family of undercover superheroes, while trying to live the quiet suburban life, are forced into action to save the world."

"I consider it perfect in the fact that there isn't a single thing (whether it be plot, characterization, humor, pacing) that I would have changed. There isn't a single flaw that I personally had with it." — whatzgood

7. "The Godfather: Part II" (1974)

Al Pacino in "The Godfather: Part II."

Paramount Pictures via MovieClips

Synopsis: "The early life and career of Vito Corleone in 1920s New York is portrayed while his son, Michael, expands and tightens his grip on the family crime syndicate."

"Personally the juxtaposition of how Don Corleone came to power and what Michael is doing to continue that power is amazing. The performances from [Robert] DeNiro and [Al] Pacino are legendary and timeless." — a-bso

8. "Vertigo" (1958)

The Alfred Hitchcock film stars James Stewart.

Universal screengrab via MovieClips

Synopsis: "A San Francisco detective suffering from acrophobia investigates the strange activities of an old friend's wife, all the while becoming dangerously obsessed with her."

"It's really slow, but masterfully done. I love how the final shot of the film is similar to the opening scene (without giving anything away). And the mystery was good too, it's paced just right so that it never feels too fast. And you learn info at the appropriate rate." — VarrickCarter23

10. "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou" (2004)

Bill Murray stars in "The Life Aquatic."

Touchstone Pictures

Synopsis: "With a plan to exact revenge on a mythical shark that killed his partner, oceanographer Steve Zissou rallies a crew that includes his estranged wife, a journalist, and a man who may or may not be his son."

"My 10/10 movie is 'The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.' It's such an intricate, complicated character study and even after seeing it more than ten times, every time I watch it I pick up things I didn't see the previous watch. All the characters are so well-realized and fit so well together in that world and it culminates in one of the most poignant moments I've ever seen on screen." — Groosenator2000

11. "Synecdoche, New York" (2008)

Philip Seymour Hoffman in "Synecdoche, New York."

Sony Pictures Classic

Synopsis: "A theatre director struggles with his work, and the women in his life, as he creates a life-size replica of New York City inside a warehouse as part of his new play."

"This film balances everything from humor, suspense, and at times is downright depressing. The reason why this film is 10/10 for me is not only it's grand themes, but also it's most subtle details. For instance, in the opening scenes, we are brought months into the future without realizing time is passing without paying close attention to the dates in the newspapers, the times mentioned on the radio, and the dialogue. We realize as the audience that through repetition in daily life, we can forget about time. These small details can be forgotten but definitely add to rewatching the film trying to spot them out." — jonymcg

12. "Toy Story" (1995)

Pixar's first film is one of its finest.

Disney Pixar

Synopsis: "A cowboy doll is profoundly threatened and jealous when a new spaceman figure supplants him as top toy in a boy's room."

"'Toy Story's' script is one of the strongest ever written, with minor introductions to plot elements and concepts returning at later points, and no unnecessary scenes included. It's a film that talks to both adults and children in different ways, with a fun adventure and interesting rivalry-turned-friendship, and themes of jealousy, purpose, and parental caring wrapped up within." — thegimboid

13. "Whiplash" (2014)

JK Simmons' performance in "Whiplash" may make you question picking up a musical instrument ever again.

Sony Pictures Classics/"Whiplash"

Synopsis: "A promising young drummer enrolls at a cut-throat music conservatory where his dreams of greatness are mentored by an instructor who will stop at nothing to realize a student's potential."

"I know it's only a couple years old but I can watch this movie time and time again and still be amazed. It's got everything I like in a movie. A great story, strong dialogue, well-developed characters (including one of the most memorable antagonists in recent films) brought to life by great acting, and even boasts some really excellent cinematography and music. The intensity never really fades even though I've seen it three or four times. I think it will be considered a classic in time." — noah2461

14. "No Country For Old Men" (2007)

Javier Bardem in "No Country for Old Men."

Miramax via YouTube

Synopsis: "Violence and mayhem ensue after a hunter stumbles upon a drug deal gone wrong and more than two million dollars in cash near the Rio Grande."

"From the seamless storytelling to the chilling performance from Javier Bardem, this is one of the few movies I believe to truly be flawless." — Mbags88

 

15. "Mad Max: Fury Road" (2015)

Charlize Theron in "Mad Max: Fury Road."

Jasin Boland/Warner Bros.

Synopsis"A woman rebels against a tyrannical ruler in postapocalyptic Australia in search for her home-land with the help of a group of female prisoners, a psychotic worshipper, and a drifter named Max."

"I can't put a finger on a single thing I'd change in that movie. Everything just works and clicks into place so meticulously, you'd think [director George] Miller had spent his entire life thinking up and planning this movie." — TheTjums

 

16. "Seven Samurai" (1954)

The film is co-written and directed by Akira Kurosawa.

Synopsis: "A poor village under attack by bandits recruits seven unemployed samurai to help them defend themselves."

"Seven Samurai is a 10/10 movie across all cultures, regardless of language barriers." — MollHolland

17. "Casablanca" (1942)

Ingrid Bergman and Humphrey Bogart star in "Casablanca."

Synopsis: "A cynical American expatriate struggles to decide whether or not he should help his former lover and her fugitive husband escape French Morocco."

"It may seem old now because of the black and white, but I would have a hard time suggesting any change that would improve it." — BanjoPanda

18. "Victor Victoria" (1982)

Julie Andrews stars in the Warner Bros.' movie.

Synopsis: "A struggling female soprano finds work playing a male female impersonator, but it complicates her personal life."

"Flawless performances by everyone. Julie Andrews at her best, Blake Edwards at his. Throw in amazing music by Mancini and you have a perfect movie." — Rustiest_Venture

19. "The Usual Suspects" (1995)

Bryan Singer directed the Oscar-winning thriller.

Synopsis: "A sole survivor tells of the twisty events leading up to a horrific gun battle on a boat, which began when five criminals met at a seemingly random police lineup."

"Everything about this movie is perfect to me. How it's shot, the pace, the music, the dialogue and of course the ending," — ff_beer_money

20. "A Clockwork Orange" (1971)

"A Clockwork Orange" was one of Stanley Kubrick's most controversial movies when it first debuted. It was nominated for four Oscars.

Synopsis: "In the future, a sadistic gang leader is imprisoned and volunteers for a conduct-aversion experiment, but it doesn't go as planned."

"Best performance ever, best screenplay ever, fantastic cinematography, flawlessly paced, the best film from the best director ever," — ethan3lp

21. "The Shawshank Redemption"

The film is based on a Stephen King novella and directed by Frank Darabont.

Synopsis: "Two imprisoned men bond over a number of years, finding solace and eventual redemption through acts of common decency." 

"I don't need to explain anything. If you haven't seen it.... Why are you on Reddit right now? Watch Shawshank Redemption." — atomicagesavage

22. "Reservoir Dogs" (1992)

The Quentin Tarantino film stars Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, and Steve Buscemi.

Synopsis: "When a simple jewelry heist goes horribly wrong, the surviving criminals begin to suspect that one of them is a police informant."

"The back and forth, the retelling of what happened, opening on a diner scene, then flash forward where half of them are dead and one is dying. The robbery we never see happen, the suspense of it they're gonna find out, and the hint of who the rat is before they finally reveal it. [Quentin] Tarantino is one of my favorite directors and this is my favorite film from him." — Xiaxs

23. "Forrest Gump" (1994)

The Tom Hanks' classic still holds up. It won six Oscars, including best film editing and visual effects.

Synopsis: "The presidencies of Kennedy and Johnson, the events of Vietnam, Watergate, and other historical events unfold through the perspective of an Alabama man with an IQ of 75, whose only desire is to be reunited with his childhood sweetheart."

"People have stated that a 10/10 movie be one that pioneers in terms of special effects. Funnily enough, Forrest Gump won many awards for its special effects. Awards like that generally go towards sci-fi movies." — DarthRagnarok

24. "Aliens" (1986)

The Ridley Scott-directed film won one Oscar for best visual effects.

Synopsis"After a space merchant vessel receives an unknown transmission as a distress call, one of the crew is attacked by a mysterious life form and they soon realize that its life cycle has merely begun."

"Perfect horror film. Perfect sci-fi film. For a movie made in the '70s, it holds up perfectly today." — the_nin_collector

25. "Beginners" (2010)

Ewan McGregor and Christopher Plummer star in the Focus Features' movie.

Synopsis: "A young man is rocked by two announcements from his elderly father: that he has terminal cancer and that he has a young male lover."

"Just perfect in every way. Super funny and charming, incredible performances by Ewan McGregor, Melanie Laurent, and an Oscar-winning performance by Christopher Plummer plus everyone else. Beautiful music. Directed to perfection." — TheTurnipKnight

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