These 9 White House replicas give new life to the presidential mansion

Ellen Cranley
white house replica

Matt Cardy/Getty Images


  • The White House sits at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC.
  • Its iconic color and columns make the Executive Mansion easily recognizable. 
  • For some in places including Georgia, Iraq, and Texas, visiting Washington DC isn't a requirement for seeing the White House, or at least some interpretation of it, in person. 
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The White House is one of the world's most famous homes.

Though people can visit the Executive Mansion after completing extensive paperwork, some apparently preferred to bring the experience to those who can't make the trip to Washington, DC. 

The building's iconic color, shape, and columns have inspired grand replicas in places including Georgia, Iraq, and Texas. See the museums, homes, and miniatures that take after the White House. 

Decatur, Georgia

Screenshot via Google Maps

The private home outside of Atlanta is a 3/4 scale of the White House built by a businessman who fled Iran in 1979 as an ode to democracy.

The interior doesn't totally hold true to the original but does include replicas of the Oval Office and Lincoln Bedroom.



Erbil, Iraq

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A $20-million villa built by a prominent Kurdish businessman in a high-end suburb called Dream City put an official flourish on the neighborhood.

"It's outrageous, really fancy, and well-built," Tony Hozeph, general manager of Dream City, told ABC News of the replica in 2014.



La Porte, Texas

YouTube

"Sterling Mansion" was named for former Texas governor Ross Sterling, who also founded an oil company now known as Exxon. The 20,689-square-foot building was completed in 1927.

The house was once the largest private residence in the state, sitting on six waterfront acres overlooking Galveston Bay. The mansion's 34 rooms have hosted numerous events and are outfitted for all sorts of activities, including a grand salon, a billiard room, and a media room.



Shenzhen, China

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Chinese tech giant Huawei revealed a new, massive campus in April 2019 that's styled after European cities, and features a white building with columns and bears a resemblance to the Executive Mansion.



Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin

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The "Top Secret" exhibit turns the typical White House tour on its head — literally.

The 1.5 scale model of the real deal treats visitors to an immersive archaeology-style mystery experience that sees the Oval Office, the press room, and plenty of hidden treasures.



Anaheim, California

Glenn Koenig/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Originally housing a toy museum in the 1960s, this replica is now known as the White House Banquets and Events Center. The center is ready to give West Coasters a true Washington experience, complete with a "West Wing Grand Ballroom and the Rose Garden Courtyard."



Berkshire, England

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The mini-mansion was set up at the Miniland exhibit in the English resort, and an exact twin stands in the company's exhibit in Orlando, Florida.



McLean, Virginia

Screenshot via CBS on YouTube

This house on Georgetown Pike sits just two miles away from another 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. replica, and was sold at auction in 2016 after failing to grab the listing price of $7 million. 

Perhaps the popularity of the unique, but recognizable design, isn't a surprise, as the homes are approximately 15 miles away from the White House itself. 



Prior Lake, Minnesota

Jerry Holt/Star Tribune via Getty Images

Though he didn't go for a full replica, formal tribal leader Glynn A Crooks made headlines for his carefully crafted Oval Office replica in his home. The office included curved walls and doors and was outfitted with a replica desk and artwork to make it nearly indistinguishable from the real office.

Crooks, who died in 2018, completed the office as a culminating project of his sprawling collection of presidential memorabilia. Crooks' interest in the presidency grew in the 16 years that he served as vice-chairman of the Shakopee tribe when he visited the White House and met lawmakers.

"I don't have to get permission to sit here," he told the Star Tribune. "And I don't have to give it up in four years."