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Acting Boston Mayor Kim Janey Announces She Is Running For Full Term

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Acting Mayor Kim Janey is joining at least five other candidates. WBZ-TV's Louisa Moller reports.

Video Transcript

DAVID WADE: Acting Boston Mayor Kim Janey now officially joining the already crowded race for mayor in Boston. Janey made the announcement less than two weeks after being sworn in as Boston's first Black and first woman mayor. WBZ's Louisa Moller is live for us at City Hall tonight. And Louisa, Janey says her campaign will focus on racial inequality.

LOUISA MOLLER: Well, David, Janey says her policies are rooted in her experiences. Boston-raised, she says she's experienced Boston's history, the bad and the good. And she includes forced busing and desegregation of Boston's schools that she experienced.

KIM JANEY: Now, Boston having its first woman and first Black mayor, that's just the start. We've got work to do.

LOUISA MOLLER: Kim Janey hoping history and momentum are on her side. Boston's first woman and Black mayor stood before a mural of Black leaders past and announced she will run for a full term in November.

KIM JANEY: I am standing here today because of people like Melnea Cass, who is behind me, the mother of Roxbury.

LOUISA MOLLER: Just a few weeks ago Janey left her post as city council president to fill the spot left when Mayor Marty Walsh headed to Washington. Since then, she's launched initiatives focused on racial equity, rental relief, grants aimed at increasing access to vaccination for vulnerable populations, prepaid CharlieCards and bike passes for workers, and a tourism campaign to boost Boston neighborhoods away from downtown.

KIM JANEY: The work to address the challenges we face from COVID and racial inequalities that have been inherited from centuries of structural racism will take longer than a few months to change.

LOUISA MOLLER: Janey joins a crowded field; City councilors Michelle Wu, Andrea Campbell, Annissa Essaibi George, State representative Jon Santiago, and former Boston economic development chief John Barros. Campbell, the only other Black woman in the race, said her experience and background still set her apart.

ANDREA CAMPBELL: Boston has a unique opportunity to address our own painful history of race and racism and division, and to do the really hard work of eradicating the inequities in our city that exist because of that history. And for that to happen, I truly believe and still believe that I'm the best candidate to do just that.

LOUISA MOLLER: Several of the candidates released statements welcoming Janey to the field and pointing to their own experiences. We still have a ways to go until the election on November 2. Live outside Boston City Hall, Louisa Moller, "WBZ News."