GOP Lawmaker Knocks Trump For 'Taking A Shot At Biden While Praising A Dictator'

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Ed Mazza
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A Republican lawmaker is calling out President Donald Trump for attacking former Vice President Joe Biden and praising North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un in a tweet over Memorial Day weekend.

“This is just plain wrong,” Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) wrote on Twitter.

Kim last week attacked Biden as a “fool of low IQ” and an “imbecile.”

Trump sided with Kim, gleefully joining in the attack in a tweet calling Biden a “low IQ individual & worse.” Trump deleted the tweet after misspelling Biden, then sent it out again after correcting the typo.

He also said he had “confidence” in Kim and even suggested the dictator was sending him “a signal.”

Kinzinger, a veteran who served in Iraq and remains an active duty member of the Air National Guard, replied to the president’s corrected tweet:

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Trump’s “confidence” in Kim also came under attack by Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa), who said she “certainly wouldn’t trust Kim Jong Un.”

Trump dismissed North Korea’s latest missile tests as “small weapons,” but Ernst on CNN called them “very disturbing.”

“We need to see North Korea back off of those activities, and we need to take a very strong stance on that,” Ernst said. “Understanding the president has a job to do in negotiating but we do need to push back on North Korea.”

The White House on Sunday didn’t back down.

Trump and Kim “agree in their assessment of former Vice President Joe Biden,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said on “Meet the Press.”

She added that Trump’s “focus in this process is the relationship he has [with Kim] and making sure we continue on the path of denuclearization.”

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A traffic guard goes through the motions in the capital of Pyongyang, where streets are almost empty of cars. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
A traffic guard goes through the motions in the capital of Pyongyang, where streets are almost empty of cars. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
Members of one of the world’s largest militaries, over a million strong, pack a stadium in Pyongyang in 2012 during celebrations honoring North Korea’s first leader, Kim Il Sung. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
Members of one of the world’s largest militaries, over a million strong, pack a stadium in Pyongyang in 2012 during celebrations honoring North Korea’s first leader, Kim Il Sung. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
Children mobilized for the annual mass games in Pyongyang act as pixels to portray a happy patriot in uniform. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
Children mobilized for the annual mass games in Pyongyang act as pixels to portray a happy patriot in uniform. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
At dawn, portraits of Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jong Il are still lit up in Pyongyang. Even during the city’s blackouts, electricity is reserved to light the flame atop Juche Tower. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
At dawn, portraits of Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jong Il are still lit up in Pyongyang. Even during the city’s blackouts, electricity is reserved to light the flame atop Juche Tower. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
A man tends to his bicycle outside a housing complex in Kaesong, not far from the border with South Korea. An exclamation point at the end of an emphatic propaganda slogan punctuates the scene. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
A man tends to his bicycle outside a housing complex in Kaesong, not far from the border with South Korea. An exclamation point at the end of an emphatic propaganda slogan punctuates the scene. (David Guttenfelder/National Geographic)
All images are from the October 125th anniversary issue of National Geographic magazine.
All images are from the October 125th anniversary issue of National Geographic magazine.

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This article originally appeared on HuffPost.