• Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'
    Yahoo News

    Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'

    Democratic lawmakers in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives are demanding answers after learning that one of their Republican colleagues tested positive for COVID-19, shared that information with GOP leadership, but never informed them. On May 20, Republican Rep. Andrew Lewis learned he had tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Two other Republican House members who came in contact with Lewis were told to self-quarantine for 14 days, but Democratic lawmakers, some of whom also had contact with Lewis or with the two other Republicans before May 20, say they first learned of the positive test result on Wednesday.

  • How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?
    Yahoo News 360

    How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

    China's legislature on Thursday approved a controversial national security law that gives the mainland government new powers to police subversion and foreign intervention in Hong Kong. Critics of the new law say it's a violation of the “one country, two systems” agreement that has granted Hong Kong certain levels of autonomy — like its own police force and judicial system — since the island became part of China in 1997 after more than a century of British rule. Similar laws have been pursued by pro-Beijing members of Hong Kong's legislature several times in recent years, but none were passed.

  • Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi
    The Telegraph

    Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

    The killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province.

  • ‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police Violence
    The Daily Beast

    ‘Burn It Down. Let Them Pay’: Deadly Chaos Erupts in Minneapolis as Fires Rage Over Police Violence

    MINNEAPOLIS—Flames and black smoke poured into the sky here early Thursday as protests over the death of George Floyd took a violent turn, with multiple local businesses and residential buildings near police headquarters set ablaze and at least one person fatally shot in the area. Minneapolis Police spokesman John Elder confirmed the shooting shortly before midnight local time, but did not say if it was connected to the protests, according to the Star Tribune. Widespread looting included mobs—whose ties to organized protesters were vague at best—clearing out a Target across from the precinct house, and video emerged of heavily armed white men who said they were trying to keep people from damaging property.

  • Twitter fact-checked a Chinese government spokesman after he suggested the US brought COVID-19 to Wuhan
    Business Insider

    Twitter fact-checked a Chinese government spokesman after he suggested the US brought COVID-19 to Wuhan

    REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Twitter has labeled two tweets from Chinese government spokesman Lijan Zhao with a fact-check icon. Twitter applied the label to the tweets after being questioned by the New York Post over a potential double standard, following the company's decision to fact-check tweets from President Trump. Zhao's tweets are from mid-March, and in them he suggests the US army could have been responsible for bringing the coronavirus to Wuhan.

  • Mississippi mayor under fire over comments on George Floyd's death
    NBC News

    Mississippi mayor under fire over comments on George Floyd's death

    A Mississippi mayor is under fire for comments about the in-custody death of George Floyd, including his remark, “if you can talk, you can breathe.” Floyd, 46, who was black, died in Minneapolis police custody after a white officer pinned him to the ground and put his knee on his neck for about eight minutes. Marx, who could not immediately be reached by NBC News on Thursday morning, said he “didn't see anything unreasonable” in the video that led to the firing of four Minneapolis police officers on Tuesday, and that the cops involved are being “crucified.”

  • Moscow's new coronavirus cases fall to lowest in more than a month
    Reuters

    Moscow's new coronavirus cases fall to lowest in more than a month

    The Kremlin on Thursday praised Moscow's authorities after the city reported its lowest daily increase in coronavirus infections since April 23, but some critics raised questions over some of Russia's reported data. Officials say Russia's outbreak is stabilising and President Vladimir Putin this week rescheduled Moscow's postponed May 9 Victory Day military parade for June 24. Moscow will begin easing its lockdown on Monday.

  • Texas Children's Hospital treating several children with inflammatory illness linked to COVID-19
    KTRK – Houston

    Texas Children's Hospital treating several children with inflammatory illness linked to COVID-19

    Some of the children are reportedly in critical condition. Though the illness itself isn't contagious, but could be deadly if left untreated.

  • ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium
    AFP

    ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium

    The International Criminal Court on Thursday said former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo can leave Belgium under certain conditions following his acquittal last year over post-electoral violence that killed 3,000 people. Gbagbo and his deputy Charles Ble Goude were both cleared of crimes against humanity a year ago, eight years after the former West African strongman's arrest and transfer to the Hague-based court. Belgium agreed to host Gbagbo, 73, after he was released in February last year under strict conditions including that he would return to court for a prosecution appeal against his acquittal.

  • NSA: Russian agents have been hacking major email program
    Associated Press

    NSA: Russian agents have been hacking major email program

    The U.S. National Security Agency says the same Russian military hacking group that interfered in the 2016 presidential election and unleashed a devastating malware attack the following year has been exploiting a major email server program since last August or earlier. The timing of the agency's advisory Thursday was unusual considering that the critical vulnerability in the Exim Mail Transfer Agent — which mostly runs on Unix-type operating systems — was identified 11 months ago, when a patch was issued. Exim is so widely used — though far less known than such commercial alternatives as Microsoft's proprietary Exchange — that some companies and government agencies that run it may still not have patched the vulnerability, said Jake Williams, president of Rendition Infosec and a former U.S. government hacker.

  • Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car Size
    Consumer Reports

    Study: Death Rates for Drivers Vary by Car Size

    Driver Death Rates by Car Type Death rates are per million registered vehicle years, as indicated. Cars: 48 Minivans: 22 SUVs: 25 Pickup trucks: 29 The Ford Fiesta had the highest overall number of deaths per million registered vehicle years, with 141, according to the IIHS. The Hyundai Accent and Chevrolet Sonic followed closely behind, with 116 and 98 deaths per million registered vehicle years.

  • Denmark and Norway cut coronavirus-hit Sweden out of free travel deal
    The Telegraph

    Denmark and Norway cut coronavirus-hit Sweden out of free travel deal

    The governments of Denmark and Norway have cut Sweden out of a deal allowing each other's tourists to travel freely between the two countries — citing their Nordic neighbour's higher levels of coronavirus infection. The deal, announced at parallel press conferences in Oslo and Copenhagen on Friday afternoon, showed Sweden has failed in its diplomatic efforts to be included in the first stage of a Nordic travel bubble. Under the deal, people from Denmark will from June 15 be allowed to enter Norway without needing to quarantine, while tourists from Norway will be able to enter Denmark, so long as they have booked accommodation for at least six days.

  • Surveillance video of the moments leading up to George Floyd being pinned under a policeman's knee shows that he didn't resist arrest
    INSIDER

    Surveillance video of the moments leading up to George Floyd being pinned under a policeman's knee shows that he didn't resist arrest

    Security footage from a restaurant near where George Floyd was taken into custody by Minneapolis police officers on Monday shows him turning around to look at his handcuffed wrists and grimacing in pain. NBC News obtained nearly 60 minutes of surveillance video showing everything from Floyd being taken out of his car to being led across the street to a squad car, where he appears to fall down. A Minneapolis Fire Department incident report described an off-duty firefighter as saying they saw Floyd "go from struggling to unresponsive on the ground while handcuffed and subdued" by the officers.

  • It's pretty safe to swim in a pool during the coronavirus pandemic. Just avoid the locker room and keep moving.
    Business Insider

    It's pretty safe to swim in a pool during the coronavirus pandemic. Just avoid the locker room and keep moving.

    Reuters/Dominic Ebenbichler Water itself is quite safe from the coronavirus, especially if it's properly treated with chlorine. But you could still catch or spread the illness if you're clustering around others above water, on the pool deck, or in the locker room. To reduce your risk, keep swimming, try to maintain distance from others while you do so, and avoid the locker room.

  • Officer at center of George Floyd's death had history of prior complaints
    NBC News

    Officer at center of George Floyd's death had history of prior complaints

    The Minneapolis police officer seen kneeling on the neck of an unarmed black man heard saying "I can't breathe" multiple times before he died was a 19-year department veteran who was the subject of a dozen police conduct complaints that resulted in no disciplinary action. The officer, who was praised for valor during his career, also once fired his weapon during an encounter with a suspect, records show. The officer, Derek Chauvin, and three fellow officers were fired Tuesday from the Minneapolis Police Department, one day after the incident involving George Floyd, whose cries of physical pain were recorded on a cellphone video and whose death led to a wave of violent protests Wednesday nigh...

  • China plans to extend curbs on international flights until June 30: U.S. embassy
    Reuters

    China plans to extend curbs on international flights until June 30: U.S. embassy

    Chinese civil aviation authorities plan to extend until June 30 their curbs on international flights to contain the spread of the coronavirus, the U.S. embassy in Beijing said in a travel advisory on Friday. China has drastically cut such flights since March to allay concerns over infections brought by arriving passengers. A so-called "Five One" policy allows mainland carriers to fly just one flight a week on one route to any country and foreign airlines to operate just one flight a week to China.

  • Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels
    AFP

    Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

    Iran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. The vessels included Ashura-class speedboats, Zolfaghar coastal patrol boats and Taregh submarines, state television reported. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran.

  • Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of world
    BBC

    Coronavirus: How the pandemic in US compares with rest of world

    Two days after the US recorded its first case of coronavirus, Donald Trump said the situation was "totally under control" and assured the public it was "going to be just fine". Fast forward four months and the virus has spread across all 50 states, leaving a death toll of 100,000 from more than 1.6 million confirmed cases. The death toll in the US became the highest in the world in early April and has risen dramatically since then.

  • Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship
    Associated Press

    Navy admiral submits results of probe on virus-infected ship

    The Navy's top admiral on Wednesday received the results of an internal investigation into the spread of the coronavirus aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the firing of the aircraft carrier's skipper in April. The report is not expected to be made public until decisions are made about potentially restoring Capt. Brett Crozier to command of the Roosevelt or disciplining other officers. It was submitted Wednesday to Adm. Mike Gilday, the chief of naval operations.

  • The next 100 days: How the coronavirus will continue to change your life at home, at work, at school and beyond
    USA TODAY

    The next 100 days: How the coronavirus will continue to change your life at home, at work, at school and beyond

    It didn't take much longer than 100 days for the coronavirus to claim the lives of 100,000 Americans, an unimaginable toll when the first person in the U.S. died of COVID-19, believed to have happened Feb. 6 in California. The social distancing measures widely adopted throughout the country succeeded in slowing down the virus' spread, as borne out by the diminished rates of new infections and deaths in May – but not enough to keep the U.S. from reaching the grim milestone of 100,000 deaths Wednesday, according to the Johns Hopkins University data dashboard. USA TODAY consulted experts in a variety of fields, including public health, business, history, social sciences and the hospitality industry, to get an assessment of what the new normal may look like in the next 100 days.

  • Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN
    The Telegraph

    Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

    Five British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya's renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar's opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military.

  • Ex-officer who knelt on George Floyd's neck charged with murder
    NBC News

    Ex-officer who knelt on George Floyd's neck charged with murder

    The former Minneapolis police officer shown on video putting his knee on George Floyd's neck for more than 8 1/2 minutes - as he pleaded for air and his mom - was arrested Friday for the man's murder, authorities said. Derek Chauvin, who was fired on Tuesday along with three other officers involved in the detainment of Floyd, was taken into custody Friday and faces charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter, Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman announced. Passers-by took video of Floyd pleading "I can't breathe," as Chauvin, who is white, kneeled on the man's neck for exactly 8 minutes and 45 seconds on Monday night, according to state charging documents, citing footage from officers' body cameras.

  • Rep. Jim Jordan on 2.1M filing for unemployment benefits in a week
    FOX News Videos

    Rep. Jim Jordan on 2.1M filing for unemployment benefits in a week

    Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, Republican member of the House Judiciary Committee, joins 'The Daily Briefing.

  • Peter Manfredonia, the 23-year-old college student suspected of double murder, has been captured after a weeklong, multi-state manhunt
    INSIDER

    Peter Manfredonia, the 23-year-old college student suspected of double murder, has been captured after a weeklong, multi-state manhunt

    Connecticut State Police Peter Manfredonia, 23, was taken into custody in Hagerstown, Maryland, on Wednesday evening. The University of Connecticut senior had led law enforcement on a six-day, multi-state manhunt after he allegedly killed a 62-year-old man with a machete. In that time, Manfredonia was suspected of killing another man and kidnapping one woman, before crossing state lines from Connecticut to New Jersey, and abandoning her there.

  • Reuters

    Fourth Iranian tanker docks at Venezuelan port, U.S. slams 'distraction'

    The Venezuelan navy said it escorted a fourth tanker bringing Iranian fuel through its waters on Thursday, while the United States called the shipments to the gasoline-starved country a distraction from problems facing President Nicolas Maduro. The oil industries of Iran and Venezuela are both under U.S. sanctions. Iran is providing its fellow OPEC member up to 1.53 million barrels of gasoline and refining components to help ease an acute shortage, the result of the near-complete breakdown in its refining network as well as the sanctions.