Alex Jones jury sees ‘Infowars’ host mock parents of murdered children on day 3 of trial

·2 min read

The Connecticut jury in Alex Jones’ defamation trial saw footage of the “Infowars” host taunting the grieving families who are suing him for claiming they were part of a manufactured drama meant to promote gun-control legislation.

One of the clips played for the jury of three men and three women seated in a courthouse just 20 miles from where 26 people were gunned down in December 2012 started with the 48-year-old right-wing broadcaster saying that “if” children were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School, he sympathizes for their parents.

“The only problem is,” Jones continued in that video, “I’ve watched a lot of soap operas and I’ve seen actors and I know when I’m watching a movie and when I’m watching something real.”

Jurors also heard Jones describe the traumatized parents of slain first-graders as “crisis actors” when attorney Brittany Paz took the stand to speak on Jones’ behalf during the third day of hearings. The 48-year-old TV host has spent the week in Austin, Texas, taping his conspiracy-peddling program.

Victims’ families, including the sister of a slain teacher who testified Tuesday, claim reports Jones made on his show led to years of harassment from his unhinged followers. Jurors in Waterbury, Conn., were also told that Jones’ absurd coverage of the Sandy Hook killings led to a spike in ratings and revenue for his media and retail brand.

He has called the bloody crime scene fake and compared it to the non-existent “$3 bill.”

An attorney for the plaintiff told the court that Jones used what the TV host said was a long dormant website linked to Sandy Hook Elementary to argue the school was inactive when the killings were reported. Jones’ attorney conceded Thursday that the site her client referenced on his show was not that of the Newtown, Conn., school.

The city demolished the campus where the massacre by Adam Lanza, 20, occurred and built a new one in its place, which opened in 2016.

Jones has already been held liable for his coverage of the Sandy Hook killings. Jurors in Connecticut are assessing what he will pay in damages to those impacted by his deceitful reporting. A Texas jury ruled him accountable for nearly $50 million in damages incurred by families who sued him in his home state.

With News Wire Services