Allen Murder-Suicide Puts Spotlight On Depression, Mental Health

The CDC reports the number of people dealing with depression continues to rise and estimates around 3% of children ages 3 to 17 have regular feelings of depression.

Video Transcript

- Police continuing to investigate a murder-suicide that left an entire family dead. It happened early Monday. Allen Police believe two brothers responsible were battling depression. As our Erin Jones reports, it is leading to a discussion on mental illness and getting help.

ERIN JONES: After posting a lengthy suicide note to Instagram, police say 19-year-old Farhan Tawhid and his older brother, Tanvir, killed their parents, sister, and grandmother before turning the gun on themselves. In Tawhid's note, he said he had been battling with depression since ninth grade. And his older brother suffered from depression as well. Tawhid wrote his brother came to him in February of this year proposing they commit suicide if things don't get better and kill the rest of their family to not cause them any pain.

JOE FELTY: In the 21 years I've been here, we've never had an incident like this. The lockdown in general and just the lack of communication-- it's hard. It's been hard on folks that suffer from depression or other type of mental health-related issues.

ERIN JONES: The CDC reports the number of people dealing with depression continues to rise and estimates around 3% of children ages 3 to 17 have regular feelings of depression. That percentage increases to almost 5% for adults 18 and over. The chief clinical officer at Dallas Children's Advocacy Center says in children, teens, and young adults, a change in interests, irritability, and isolation can indicate they're depressed.

She encourages parents who are witnessing these signs to check in and don't be afraid to ask questions.

KELLY SLAVEN: It is always OK to say, hey, it seems like you're spending more time in your room lately. What's going on with that?

ERIN JONES: She says if needed, seek professional help. Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of.

KELLY SLAVEN: I think what stands out to me in this case is it sounds like the family did a lot of things right. They sought mental health treatment. He was, it sounds like, on medication for some time.

ERIN JONES: And if it's still not working, what are your options?

KELLY SLAVEN: Yeah. So I think don't give up. Don't be afraid to find a therapist that's a great fit for you.

ERIN JONES: In Dallas, Erin Jones, CBS 11 News.

- A much-needed discussion. For those who are struggling with suicidal thoughts, the National Prevention Suicide Prevention Lifeline, it operates 24/7, offering free and confidential support. There is also an online text option.