Amanda Knox announces birth of first child

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Amanda Knox, who was imprisoned in Italy and later acquitted in the murder of her British roommate, announced the birth of her first child on social media and in a New York Times article.

Knox, 34, posted Saturday on Instagram about the birth of her daughter with her husband, Christopher Robinson.

In a New York Times article published Friday night, Knox said she the girl was named Eureka Muse Knox-Robinson.

"I'm so grateful to everyone who has wished [Robinson] and I well on our journey to parenthood. Thank you for believing in us," Knox wrote on Instagram. Knox said the image she shared, of herself holding Eureka, would be the only image of her child she posts to social media.

In a statement to NBC News, Knox said her annulled conviction in Italy pushed her into the spotlight, which was not what she wanted.

"I have no legal recourse to prevent the tabloids from writing about my wedding, or the birth of my child, which are not newsworthy subjects in the public interest. That means I'm trapped with few good options. I can remain as silent as possible, knowing there will be a paparazzi bounty on my daughter's head, and let them be the only ones writing about MY life experience, framing it however they wish," she said. "Or I can tell a better story about my experience, a more intimate and vulnerable one."

Knox said she had released a three-part podcast miniseries called "Labyrinths," about the realities of pregnancy.

Related: Knox was invited to speak at a conference organized by the Italy Innocence Project, which works to aid those falsely accused and charged of crimes.

Knox said she is able to tell the story of her pregnancy in her own words on "Labyrinths" — not one crafted for her. She ended by saying her daughter's life was "off limits" to the media.

"Her life is her own, and she is not your content. She deserves to have her privacy respected in the way that mine never was,” she said.

Knox and Raffaele Sollecito, her then-boyfriend, were convicted in the killing of Knox's roommate, Meredith Kercher, a British student, in 2007. After a retrial and a series of controversies, Italy's highest court annulled Knox's convictions in 2015.

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