Amazon workers plan Black Friday protests worldwide

Yahoo Finance's Ines Ferre details the "Make Amazon Pay" protests organized by workers demanding enhanced benefits and recognition of employee labor unions.

Video Transcript

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JARED BLIKRE: Welcome back. Make Amazon Pay, this is a collection of workers and activists, and guess what? They're going to be protesting Amazon this Black Friday. They want to see the retail giant raise wages, pay more taxes, and reduce its carbon footprint. And for all the details we're going to bring in Yahoo Finance's Ines Ferré. And Ines, it's kind of a big one walking out on the big retail day, huh?

INES FERRÉ: Yeah, that's right, on the busiest shopping day of the year these Amazon workers saying that they will be protesting. Make Amazon Pay, as you just mentioned, that's the group of workers, also more than 40 activists here in the US and also in other countries. And they're saying that on Black Friday they will be protesting against Amazon in different states, in California, and Minnesota, also in New York City, and in Boston. And they have published a list of 25 demands from Amazon. They want higher pay, they want more paid sick leave time. They also want Amazon to pay more taxes, and they want Amazon to reduce its carbon footprint.

Now, it's unclear how many people will be protesting during this event. We know that Amazon over the last year has received quite a bit of criticism from workers, from former workers, complaining about sort of the long hours, complaining about having to work during COVID-19. We know that also Amazon had settled a suit in California for failing to notify employees about how many cases of COVID-19 there were in certain warehouses.

And the other big push that they had been making also is for them to be allowed to unionize. And one of the demands in this list of 25 demands, is for Amazon to end union-busting as these workers are calling it. To end the tactics to sort of stonewall their efforts to unionize.

Now, we did reach out to Amazon for a statement, and Kelly Nantel, Amazon spokesperson said, "These groups represent a variety of interests, and while we are not perfect in any area-- you'll see that we do take our role and our impact very seriously." She goes on to say that they've invested significantly in addressing climate change and offering competitive wages and great benefits and also investing in new ways to keep their employees safe and healthy in their operations and network. Also, Kelly saying that anyone can see for themselves by taking a live virtual tour at their sites. So inviting people to take those virtual tours at their sites.

AKIKO FUJITA: Yeah, Ines, this is just the latest threat of a strike from Amazon but certainly, they're not the only ones. We've talked a lot about a lot of workers really pushing their employers and going on strike with so much leverage or leverage as they see it. So thanks so much for that story.

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