Do Ambertech's (ASX:AMO) Earnings Warrant Your Attention?

·4 min read

Some have more dollars than sense, they say, so even companies that have no revenue, no profit, and a record of falling short, can easily find investors. But the reality is that when a company loses money each year, for long enough, its investors will usually take their share of those losses.

If, on the other hand, you like companies that have revenue, and even earn profits, then you may well be interested in Ambertech (ASX:AMO). While that doesn't make the shares worth buying at any price, you can't deny that successful capitalism requires profit, eventually. In comparison, loss making companies act like a sponge for capital - but unlike such a sponge they do not always produce something when squeezed.

Check out our latest analysis for Ambertech

How Fast Is Ambertech Growing Its Earnings Per Share?

In a capitalist society capital chases profits, and that means share prices tend rise with earnings per share (EPS). So like the hint of a smile on a face that I love, growing EPS generally makes me look twice. It is therefore awe-striking that Ambertech's EPS went from AU$0.014 to AU$0.064 in just one year. Even though that growth rate is unlikely to be repeated, that looks like a breakout improvement. Could this be a sign that the business has reached an inflection point?

I like to take a look at earnings before interest and (EBIT) tax margins, as well as revenue growth, to get another take on the quality of the company's growth. The good news is that Ambertech is growing revenues, and EBIT margins improved by 4.6 percentage points to 6.6%, over the last year. Ticking those two boxes is a good sign of growth, in my book.

You can take a look at the company's revenue and earnings growth trend, in the chart below. For finer detail, click on the image.

earnings-and-revenue-history
earnings-and-revenue-history

Since Ambertech is no giant, with a market capitalization of AU$34m, so you should definitely check its cash and debt before getting too excited about its prospects.

Are Ambertech Insiders Aligned With All Shareholders?

Like standing at the lookout, surveying the horizon at sunrise, insider buying, for some investors, sparks joy. This view is based on the possibility that stock purchases signal bullishness on behalf of the buyer. However, insiders are sometimes wrong, and we don't know the exact thinking behind their acquisitions.

The good news for Ambertech shareholders is that no insiders reported selling shares in the last year. So it's definitely nice that Non-Executive Chairman Peter Wallace bought AU$23k worth of shares at an average price of around AU$0.23.

On top of the insider buying, we can also see that Ambertech insiders own a large chunk of the company. Indeed, with a collective holding of 57%, company insiders are in control and have plenty of capital behind the venture. To me this is a good sign because it suggests they will be incentivised to build value for shareholders over the long term. Valued at only AU$34m Ambertech is really small for a listed company. That means insiders only have AU$19m worth of shares, despite the large proportional holding. That might not be a huge sum but it should be enough to keep insiders motivated!

Does Ambertech Deserve A Spot On Your Watchlist?

Ambertech's earnings per share growth have been levitating higher, like a mountain goat scaling the Alps. The cherry on top is that insiders own a bunch of shares, and one has been buying more. This quick rundown suggests that the business may be of good quality, and also at an inflection point, so maybe Ambertech deserves timely attention. It is worth noting though that we have found 5 warning signs for Ambertech that you need to take into consideration.

There are plenty of other companies that have insiders buying up shares. So if you like the sound of Ambertech, you'll probably love this free list of growing companies that insiders are buying.

Please note the insider transactions discussed in this article refer to reportable transactions in the relevant jurisdiction.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

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