American-born IS bride in same camp as Shamima Begum describes 'meltdown' after US ban

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Hoda Muthana, who left Alabama for the Islamic State group's self-declared caliphate
Hoda Muthana, who left Alabama for the Islamic State group's self-declared caliphate

A US-born Islamic State bride who urged jihadists in America to “go on drive-bys, and spill all of their blood” said she had “a meltdown” when Donald Trump declared that she would never be allowed to return home.

Hoda Muthana, 25, is living in the same detention camp in northern Syria as Shamima Begum, one of the Bethnal Green schoolgirls who joined the terror group, but faces an uncertain future after a federal judge ruled that she is not a US citizen and has no right to enter America.

Her Yemeni father was first secretary with the country’s mission to the UN, and despite being born in Hackensack, New Jersey, she is not a US citizen under rules barring the offspring of diplomats from being automatically granted citizenship.

Ms Muthana left her home in Birmingham, Alabama in 2014 and travelled to Syria, where she thought the Islamic State (IS) territory would be “a happy place” but instead found it to be “hell on earth.”

Detailing her life in a new documentary ‘The Return: Life After ISIS’ Ms Muthana talks from Roj camp about her two-year-old son and her three arranged marriages.

Shamima Begum pictured on March 14, 2021 - Sam Tarling for The Telegraph
Shamima Begum pictured on March 14, 2021 - Sam Tarling for The Telegraph

She says she left IS out of safety concerns for her son, and becoming disillusioned with the group. '"I walked out with the Syrians just to save my child and me from the starvations and the bombings and this horrible way. I really regret it for the rest of my life and wish I could erase," she says.

In Britain, the Government is drawing up plans to impose exclusion orders on three British-Bangladeshis alleged to have joined Islamic State (IS) in Syria who can now return to Britain after regaining their UK citizenship.

Ministers are prepared to impose the orders which allows them to “control” their return to the UK by detaining them in a third country before escorting them to the UK or requiring them to come back via fixed route to be met by police who could arrest them pending an investigation.

Breach of a temporary exclusion order is a criminal offence and carries a maximum penalty of five years in jail. They can remain in force for two years.

The three won an appeal on Thursday against the Government’s decision to strip them of their British citizenship.

The two women and one man were judged to have been left stateless by the Government’s move as they had lost their right to Bangladeshi citizenship by having reached the age of 21. It is illegal under international law to make someone stateless.

The two women, who were born in the UK and are known only as C3 and C4, and the man, C7, who was born in Bangladesh but became a British citizen at birth, were said by the Government to be threats to national security because of their links to IS.

There is an upcoming case where two other British Bangladeshis - E3 and N3 - continue to be barred from Britain despite winning back their British citizenship after being stripped of it nearly two years ago. They have been stateless since.

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