These are the 10 books that made the ALA's most-challenged list for 2020 - photos

Kevin Shalvey
·3 min read
Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird and Toni Morrison The Bluest Eye
Authors Harper Lee and Toni Morrison. AP Photo
  • The American Library Association has released its list of the most frequently challenged books.

  • Titles included "All American Boys," "Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You," and "George."

  • Demands to remove books addressing racism and racial justice grew last year, said the organization.

  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

The American Library Association published the list of the 10 most challenged and banned books in the country for 2020, including "All American Boys," "Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You," and "George."

"Demands to remove books addressing racism and racial justice or those that shared the stories of Black, Indigenous, or people of color grew in number," the ALA said.

Here are the 10 titles.

10. "The Hate U Give," by Angie Thomas

Angie Thomas The Hate U Give
Author Angie Thomas. Rogelio V. Solis/AP Photo

"Challenged for profanity, and it was thought to promote an anti-police message," said the ALA.

9. "The Bluest Eye," by Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison Orchid 1994 Books The Bluest Eye
Author Toni Morrison. Kathy Willens/AP Photo

"Banned and challenged because it was considered sexually explicit and depicts child sexual abuse."

8. "Of Mice and Men," by John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck 1062 Author Of Mice And Men Books
Author John Steinbeck. Anthony Camerano/AP Photo

"Banned and challenged for racial slurs and racist stereotypes, and their negative effect on students."

7. "To Kill a Mockingbird," by Harper Lee

Author Harper Lee 2007 To Kill a Mockingbird
Author Harper Lee. Rob Carr/AP Photo

"Banned and challenged for racial slurs and their negative effect on students, featuring a 'white savior' character, and its perception of the Black experience."

6. "Something Happened in Our Town: A Child's Story About Racial Injustice," by Marianne Celano, Marietta Collins, and Ann Hazzard. Illustrated by Jennifer Zivoin.

Something Happened In Our Town
"Something Happened in Our Town: A Child's Story about Racial Injustice." Magination Press

"Challenged for 'divisive language' and because it was thought to promote anti-police views."

5. "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian," by Sherman Alexie

Author Sherman Alexie 2016 The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian
Author Sherman Alexie. Elaine Thompson/AP Photo

"Banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and allegations of sexual misconduct by the author."

4. "Speak," by Laurie Halse Anderson

"Speak" by Laurie Halse Anderson
"Speak," by Laurie Halse Anderson Square Fish/MacMillan Books

"Banned, challenged, and restricted because it was thought to contain a political viewpoint, it was claimed to be biased against male students, and for the novel's inclusion of rape and profanity."

3. "All American Boys," by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely

all american boys 9781481463348_hr
"All American Boys," by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely Simon & Schuster

"Banned and challenged for profanity, drug use, and alcoholism, and because it was thought to promote anti-police views, contain divisive topics, and be 'too much of a sensitive matter right now."

2. "Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You," by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds

"Stamped  Racism, Antiracism, and You," by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds
"Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You," by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds. Little, Brown and Company

"Banned and challenged because of the author's public statements, and because of claims that the book contains 'selective storytelling incidents' and does not encompass racism against all people."

1. "George," by Alex Gino

"George," by Alex Gino
"George," by Alex Gino Scholastic

"Challenged, banned, and restricted for LGBTQIA+ content, conflicting with a religious viewpoint, and not reflecting 'the values of our community."

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