AOC: Pelosi ‘Singling Out’ Progressive Women of Color ‘Disrespectful’

Jack Crowe

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D., N.Y.) accused House speaker Nancy Pelosi of “singling out” progressive women of color Wednesday, deepening the rift that has emerged between the caucus’s young firebrands and leadership.

“When these comments first started, I kind of thought that she was keeping the progressive flank at more of an arm’s distance in order to protect more moderate members, which I understood,” Ocasio-Cortez told the Washington Post in an interview published Wednesday. “But the persistent singling out . . . it got to a point where it was just outright disrespectful . . . the explicit singling out of newly elected women of color.”

The comments came after Pelosi, during a closed-door meeting on Wednesday, urged her caucus to project unity and stop airing internal divisions in public.

Ocasio-Cortez said Thursday that she doesn’t believe Pelosi harbors any racial animus but argued that the speaker has established a pattern of attacking young women of color.

“It’s really just pointing out the pattern, right? We’re not talking about just progressives, it’s signaling out four individuals,” Ocasio-Cortez told CNN. “And knowing the media environment that we’re operating in, knowing the amount of death threats that we get, knowing the amount of concentrated attention, I think it’s just worth asking why.”

While she did not explicitly name them, Pelosi seemed to criticize Representatives Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, during a Saturday New York Times interview over their opposition to a supplemental border-spending package designed to alleviate the ongoing migrant-detention crisis.

“All of these people have their public whatever and their Twitter world,” Pelosi told the Times. “But they didn’t have any following. They’re four people and that’s how many votes they got,” Pelosi said.

Ocasio-Cortez fired back on Twitter, saying, “That public ‘whatever’ is called public sentiment.”

Pelosi stood by her comments on Wednesday, telling reporters that she was simply describing how many votes were cast against the spending bill, and adding that she doesn’t regret the statement.

More from National Review

  • Americans stranded at Pakistan airport after cruise ship was denied entry to multiple countries over coronavirus fears
    Yahoo News

    Americans stranded at Pakistan airport after cruise ship was denied entry to multiple countries over coronavirus fears

    A plane full of Americans and Canadians was stranded on a tarmac at an airport in Karachi, Pakistan, for several hours on Thursday after it was turned away from multiple countries due to fears of the coronavirus, according to a family member of two of the passengers. Kelly Chrjapin, whose parents were among those on the flight, said the plane contained more than 250 people, all of whom were American and Canadian nationals who had been traveling on the cruise ship MS Westerdam. One passenger from that boat tested positive for the coronavirus earlier this month.

  • ‘We should be very afraid’: Admiral who oversaw Bin Laden raid hits out at Trump over sacking of intelligence chief
    The Independent

    ‘We should be very afraid’: Admiral who oversaw Bin Laden raid hits out at Trump over sacking of intelligence chief

    In a searing op-ed, the former head of US Special Operations Command, who supervised the 2011 Navy Seal raid in Pakistan that killed Osama bin Laden, has slammed Donald Trump's reckless attitude towards the intelligence community saying that Americans should be afraid of the president's actions. Retired navy admiral William McRaven, writing in The Washington Post about the dismissal of director of national intelligence Joe Maguire, decries the fact that Mr Maguire was apparently ousted simply for doing his job – the dissemination of intelligence to elected officials. He writes: “As Americans, we should be frightened – deeply afraid for the future of the nation.

  • AP Exclusive: DEA agent accused of conspiring with cartel
    Associated Press

    AP Exclusive: DEA agent accused of conspiring with cartel

    A once-standout U.S. federal narcotics agent known for spending lavishly on luxury cars and Tiffany jewelry has been arrested on charges of conspiring to launder money with the same Colombian drug cartel he was supposed to be fighting. Jose Irizarry and his wife were arrested Friday at their home near San Juan, Puerto Rico, as part of a 19-count federal indictment that accused the 46-year-old Irizarry of “secretly using his position and his special access to information” to divert millions in drug proceeds from control of the Drug Enforcement Administration. “It's a black eye for the DEA to have one of its own engaged in such a high level of corruption," said Mike Vigil, the DEA's former Chief of International Operations.

  • A crowd in Ukraine threw bricks at buses carrying coronavirus evacuees from Wuhan to quarantine
    Business Insider

    A crowd in Ukraine threw bricks at buses carrying coronavirus evacuees from Wuhan to quarantine

    REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko A crowd of Ukrainian protesters on Thursday attacked buses ferrying evacuees from Wuhan, China, to a quarantine hospital. The buses were transporting 45 Ukrainians and 27 foreign nationals through Novi Sanzhary in central Ukraine. Nobody on board has been confirmed to have the novel coronavirus.

  • A recurring Biden campaign story about being arrested in South Africa is full of inconsistencies
    The Week

    A recurring Biden campaign story about being arrested in South Africa is full of inconsistencies

    Former Vice President Joe Biden has a pretty good tale to share — but it may be a little tall. Biden, who is running for president, has been spicing up his recent campaign stump speeches with a story of how he was arrested while in South Africa trying to see Nelson Mandela, The New York Times reports. During recent campaign speeches, Biden says he "had the great honor" of meeting Mandela and "of being arrested with our U.N. ambassador on the streets of Soweto." As Miami Herald reporter Alex Daugherty points out, Soweto is a ways away from Robben Island, where Mandela's maximum security prison was located.

  • CDC is preparing for the 'likely' spread of coronavirus in the US, officials say
    USA TODAY

    CDC is preparing for the 'likely' spread of coronavirus in the US, officials say

    Health experts sounded the alarm Friday over the worldwide threat of the coronavirus, with officials warning of its "likely" community spread in the United States and the World Health Organization cautioning that "the window of opportunity is narrowing" for containing the outbreak worldwide. The COVID-19 coronavirus, which erupted in China in December, has killed at least 2,360 people and sickened at least 77,900 worldwide, the majority of cases in mainland China. Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told reporters Friday that U.S. health officials are preparing for the coronavirus to become a pandemic.

  • Quadruple murderer executed in Tennessee
    AFP

    Quadruple murderer executed in Tennessee

    A quadruple murderer was put to death in Tennessee on Thursday despite lawyers asking the US Supreme Court for a stay of execution. Nicholas Sutton, 58, was found guilty of stabbing a fellow inmate to death in 1985. Sutton's lawyers in January asked the state's Republican governor, Bill Lee, to grant clemency, citing expressions of support for Sutton from prison officials.

  • Airport worker with no license takes plane for spin near D.C., almost crashes, feds say
    NBC News

    Airport worker with no license takes plane for spin near D.C., almost crashes, feds say

    A Virginia man piloted at least one plane without a license in 2018, in a dangerous journey that ended with a "bounced" landing, federal authorities said. Ryan Guy Parker "knowingly and willfully" flew above suburban Washington D.C., posing a "significant risk of injury and death" to himself and the public, according to an affidavit by U.S. Department of Transportation Special Agent Bret Stolle. In a Sept. 27, 2018 trip out of Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Parker nearly crashed on touch down, Stolle wrote.

  • Coronavirus: Could It Takedown China's Communist Party?
    The National Interest

    Coronavirus: Could It Takedown China's Communist Party?

    Brand “People's Republic of China” is wobbling, as if the massive picture of Mao Zedong in Tiananmen Square was swaying with an earthquake tremor. But it can only actually fall if pushed from inside. The handling of the coronavirus epidemic is undoubtedly sapping confidence in the Communist party and its formerly all-conquering general secretary, Xi Jinping.

  • A New York lawmaker wants to treat white supremacists like foreign jihadists. Is this the solution, or a new war on terror?
    Yahoo News

    A New York lawmaker wants to treat white supremacists like foreign jihadists. Is this the solution, or a new war on terror?

    If all else were to fail in his fight against the threat of domestic terrorism, Rep. Max Rose offered an unconventional plan to protect the Brooklynites who had come to hear him speak at a Jewish community center: He'd stand on guard duty at their places of worship himself. “I'll do it,” Rose told the people who came out to this low-slung stretch of Ocean Parkway, where mosques and synagogues sit next to auto repair shops and fast food joints. The first Jewish lawmaker to represent Staten Island — and the first Democrat elected by the Republican redoubt in a decade — Rose has recently emerged as a leading proponent of treating white supremacists no differently than law enforcement treats foreign terrorists.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s progressive PAC makes first round of endorsements
    Yahoo News Video

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s progressive PAC makes first round of endorsements

    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced Friday her political action committee's first round of endorsements, which will include two progressive candidates challenging sitting Democratic members of Congress.

  • Bloomberg says 3 women can be released from NDAs
    Associated Press

    Bloomberg says 3 women can be released from NDAs

    Mike Bloomberg said Friday he'd free three women from confidentiality agreements that bar them from speaking publicly about sexual harassment or discrimination suits filed against him over the last three decades. The billionaire former mayor of New York also said his company, Bloomberg LP, will no longer use such agreements “to resolve claims of sexual harassment or misconduct going forward. His remarks come after days of intense scrutiny over the treatment of women at the company he's led for three decades, and amid pressure from Democratic presidential rival Elizabeth Warren to allow the women to share their claims publicly.

  • Iowa Professor Bound and Gagged Husband Before His Death: Cops
    The Daily Beast

    Iowa Professor Bound and Gagged Husband Before His Death: Cops

    An Iowa professor has been charged for allegedly gagging and binding her husband to a chair with rope for hours before his death, authorities said on Wednesday evening. Gowun Park, a 41-year-old assistant economics professor at Simpson College, was charged with first-degree murder and first-degree kidnapping in the death of her 41-year-old husband, Sung Nam, on Saturday, West Des Moines police told The Daily Beast. Authorities allege Park bound her husband's hands and feet with zip ties before tying him to a chair in their West Des Moines home on Saturday between 10:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Park then allegedly stuffed “an item of clothing” into Nam's mouth to prevent him from yelling in protest before finally using duct tape to place a towel over his head to cover his eyes.

  • South Korea accepted that its efforts to stop the coronavirus from infecting the country failed and says it's pivoting to containment
    Business Insider

    South Korea accepted that its efforts to stop the coronavirus from infecting the country failed and says it's pivoting to containment

    Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images With coronavirus cases soaring, the government in South Korea said on Friday that it had failed to keep the virus out of the country and must now focus on containment. South Korea is now the country with the most coronavirus infections outside China, with a total of 433 confirmed cases. The government has urged the 2.5 million people in Daegu to stay in their homes and has banned some public gatherings.

  • Fuel tanker explodes causing 'catastrophic' damage on Indianapolis interstate
    USA TODAY

    Fuel tanker explodes causing 'catastrophic' damage on Indianapolis interstate

    A tanker carrying about 4,000 gallons of jet fuel overturned and exploded in Indianapolis, closing lanes and backing up traffic on two interstate highways. Authorities began receiving calls reporting an overturned semi and fire on the ramp from Interstate-465 southbound to I-70 eastbound on the city's east side just before 2 p.m., Indianapolis Fire Department Battalion Chief Rita Reith said. The fire caused "severe, catastrophic damage" to the surrounding area, Reith said, spreading nearly 500 feet and affecting both sides of the bridge.

  • Elizabeth Warren trolls Republican donor with ad in his paper telling him how much tax she'll make him pay
    The Independent

    Elizabeth Warren trolls Republican donor with ad in his paper telling him how much tax she'll make him pay

    Elizabeth Warren has bought ad space in a newspaper owned by Republican mega-donor Sheldon Adelson, taunting the billionaire with an estimate for how much he would pay during the first year of her presidency with her promised 2 per cent wealth tax. “With that small wealth tax, we can invest in Nevada families,” it continues. Ms Warren's ad was printed in the newspaper the morning after she seemed to dominate the Democratic debate in the same city by mounting a full-throated attack on another billionaire, democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg.

  • "Here we go again," Trump says about intel on Russian meddling
    CBS News

    "Here we go again," Trump says about intel on Russian meddling

    President Trump used a political rally in Las Vegas to blast reports that U.S. intelligence warned Russia is still meddling to try to interfere in the 2020 presidential election. Mr. Trump is campaigning in Nevada on the last day of a four-day swing through the West Coast. Intelligence officials warned lawmakers in a briefing before the House Intelligence Committee last week that the Russians are continuing their efforts to attack the democratic process and interfere in the 2020 election, and one prong is aimed at helping Mr. Trump.

  • This Fighter Jet Is The Biggest Threat To Russia's Su-57 Stealth Fighter (Not the F-35)
    The National Interest

    This Fighter Jet Is The Biggest Threat To Russia's Su-57 Stealth Fighter (Not the F-35)

    Key point: The Su-35S was intended as an interim solution; as a modernized air superiority fighter to sustain the Russian Aerospace Forces (VKS) through the 2010's until the Su-57 fifth-generation stealth fighter enters serial production. “A unique machine, a deadly aerial fist,” is how the official television channel of the Russian Ministry of Defense introduced the Su-35S superiority fighter earlier this week. TV Zvezda's three-minute clip of a recent Su-35S training sortie over Syria provides close-up shots of the fighter jet being prepped for flight, taking off, cruising over the Syrian coast, and firing flares.

  • Reuters

    Alarm in the holy land after visit by pilgrims with coronavirus

    Israeli and Palestinian authorities sought to quell fears of a potential local outbreak of the coronavirus after learning that South Korean pilgrims who had toured some of the holy land's most popular sites were later found to be carrying the virus. The nine tourists, who tested positive for coronavirus after returning to South Korea, earlier this month visited holy sites including Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Cave of the Patriarchs in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, according to Israel's Health Ministry. The ministry published the group's itinerary and said it was carrying out an "epidemiological investigation" to track any potential spread.

  • California Pension Fund Does Not Deny CIO’s Involvement in China’s ‘Thousand Talents Program’
    National Review

    California Pension Fund Does Not Deny CIO’s Involvement in China’s ‘Thousand Talents Program’

    The CEO of California's public pension fund said Representative Jim Banks (R., Ind. had made “baseless accusations” about the fund's chief investment officer being involved in Chinese espionage — but did not deny that Yu Ben Meng had been recruited to the “Thousand Talents Program. Marcie Frost, the head of California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS), also admitted that her organization — the largest public pension fund in the country with “approximately $400 billion in global assets — had increased its Chinese investments in 2019 after shifts in “well-established indexes.

  • Housing crisis: Berkeley law would put renters first
    Associated Press

    Housing crisis: Berkeley law would put renters first

    The mayor of Berkeley, California, proposed a new housing policy Thursday aimed at giving renters first dibs when a property goes up for sale, as the state battles a severe housing shortage and homelessness that Gov. Gavin Newsom has declared his top priority. Berkeley Mayor Jesse Arreguin announced a proposed ordinance to give renters "the first refusal and right to purchase" when their apartment buildings or rented homes are put on the market. Berkeley's city council will vote on the idea later this month.

  • Execution for a Facebook post? Why blasphemy is a capital offense in some Muslim countries
    The Conversation

    Execution for a Facebook post? Why blasphemy is a capital offense in some Muslim countries

    Junaid Hafeez, a university lecturer in Pakistan, had been imprisoned for six years when he was sentenced to death in December 2019. Pakistan has the world's second strictest blasphemy laws after Iran, according to U.S. Commision on International Religious Freedom. Hafeez, whose death sentence is under appeal, is one of about 1,500 Pakistanis charged with blasphemy, or sacrilegious speech, over the last three decades.

  • More than half of all coronavirus cases outside China are from the Diamond Princess, but the cruise ship is already planning to set sail again in April
    Business Insider

    More than half of all coronavirus cases outside China are from the Diamond Princess, but the cruise ship is already planning to set sail again in April

    Of the more than 1,000 coronavirus cases outside mainland China, 634 have been diagnosed in Diamond Princess passengers, the World Health Organization said on Wednesday. An infectious-diseases expert said the hygiene conditions on the cruise ship were abysmal, making him "so scared" of contracting COVID-19. Despite being at the center of the coronavirus outbreak, the ship's operator Princess Cruises plans to return the vessel to service before Japan's Golden Week in April.

  • Texas woman sentenced to eight years for illegal voting paroled, faces deportation
    USA TODAY

    Texas woman sentenced to eight years for illegal voting paroled, faces deportation

    Birdsall blamed Wilson for three years ago thwarting a plea agreement three years ago that would have dismissed the charges against Ortega and potentially saved her from deportation if she met conditions that included speaking to lawmakers about the dangers of election loopholes. Birdsall shared an email from January 2017 that suggests Assistant Attorney General Jonathan White, who represented Paxton's office, tentatively agreed to such a deal. "I think her story has the potential of coming across very well in the current climate and putting her in a positive light that might help secure her immigration status more than anything we can do on paper," White wrote.

  • Coronavirus updates: Cases in South Korea surge as U.S. prepares for pandemic
    NBC News

    Coronavirus updates: Cases in South Korea surge as U.S. prepares for pandemic

    Cases surge in South Korea after outbreak at church • Twenty-three cruise passengers disembarked cruise ship without testing • Coronavirus incubation could be as long as 27 days • Tokyo postpones training for Olympics volunteers over virus fears • U.S. takes steps to prepare for pandemic as global COVID—19 cases rise • Federal judge blocks effort to transfer coronavirus patients to California city • China's central bank vows to take more steps to support virus-hit economy Twenty-three cruise passengers not tested before disembarking Twenty three passengers were released from quarantine aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship without being tested for COVID-19 because of procedural mistakes, J...