Arctic shows where climate change is headed, say experts

"It's an indication of what is going to happen to the rest of the world," said polar explorer Ann Daniels, describing flooding and changing weather patterns.

"It's climate change throughout our globe and we are all connected. So for me, expedition has become about trying to understand what's happening to the Earth rather than trying to discover the geography of it."

Daniels' comments were echoed by Ilarion Mercurieff, the president of the Global Center for Indigenous Leadership and Lifeways.

"We have to understand that everything is connected and that we cannot solve the problems by addressing one issue alone. And climate crisis is a symptom, not the cause."

Neil Roberts, Head of Marine and Aviation at Lloyd's of London Market Association, said that when it came to commercial development, the arctic for general cover was "off the table."

"It's still a difficult proposition commercially. And it's insurers' role is to support commerce... We will only support commerce where it makes sense to do so."

Video Transcript

Our oceans are changing. And what's happening in the Arctic-- because it is the cold environment, and so things happen quicker there-- does affect the rest of the world. And it's an indication of what is going to happen to the rest of the world.

We see it. We see floods. We see the different weather patterns. It's climate change throughout our globe. And we are all connected. So for me, expedition has become about trying to understand what's happening to the Earth rather than trying to discover the geography of it.

I'm involved in other expeditions. But for me, it is about the science first, or the change. And I can understand. Having listened, I am now trying to sort of have more respect that way, that it isn't just about the science. And it is listening to people and the native people and understanding.

ILARION MERCURIEFF: The data-- we're the most data-driven world than we've ever been. But it's not resulting in the changes that are needed. One person and one administration is not going to materially change what's happening in the world now.

And it's not just climate crisis, that we call it as native people. It's all the things that are happening around the world to Mother Earth. We have to understand that everything is connected and that we cannot solve the problem by addressing one issue alone.

And the climate crisis is a symptom, not the cause.

NEIL ROBERTS: For us, the Arctic is at the frontier of risk. For general [? cover, ?] it's off the table completely. In terms of whether we should be [? up ?] there, that's the wider moral question. And you might probably touch on ESG there to some extent. But it is a problem for everybody. Certainly, indigenous people are not against commercial exploitation [? up ?] there. But it has to be done with sensitivity, and care, and sympathetically.