Art Institute's Eerie Existence As COVID-19 Closes Its Doors

In 141 years, the Art Institute has closed on seven occasions, including for royal visits, the death of a president and the polar vortex. But never for a public health emergency like the one caused by the coronavirus. CBS 2's Chris Tye took a tour of the now-empty galleries.

CBS 2's Chris Tye took an eerie tour of the galleries

  • Downtown D.C. burns after another night of protests and provocation near the White House
    Yahoo News

    Downtown D.C. burns after another night of protests and provocation near the White House

    The capital was awash with anger and pain as tear gas blew along the streets and rubber bullets flew Sunday night and into the early hours of Monday morning. Protesters clashed with law enforcement for the third straight evening outside the White House, and numerous businesses were vandalized by rioters defying a citywide curfew. Protesters gathered throughout Sunday in Lafayette Park, which is across the street from the White House and has been a focal point of the demonstrations that began here Friday evening.

  • New Yahoo News/YouGov poll: Most Americans say Trump is a 'racist' and want him to stop tweeting
    Yahoo News

    New Yahoo News/YouGov poll: Most Americans say Trump is a 'racist' and want him to stop tweeting

    The survey, conducted on May 29 and 30, found that 52 percent of Americans answered yes when asked whether they “think that President Trump is a racist.” Only 37 percent said no. Just 33 percent said the president should continue “posting messages on Twitter.”

  • An 'ANTIFA' Twitter account that called for looting 'white hoods' was actually run by white nationalist group Identity Evropa
    Business Insider

    An 'ANTIFA' Twitter account that called for looting 'white hoods' was actually run by white nationalist group Identity Evropa

    A fake antifa Twitter account that called for violence was actually run by a white nationalist group, according to a Twitter spokesperson. The account, "@ANTIFA_US," pretended to align with the Black Lives Matter movement and ongoing nationwide protests, and called for protesters to "move into residential areas... the white hoods.... and we take what's ours." Twitter banned the account Monday for breaking its rules against platform manipulation, spam, and inciting violence.

  • Activist challenges protesters: "Come up with a better way" in fight against racial injustice
    CBS News Videos

    Activist challenges protesters: "Come up with a better way" in fight against racial injustice

    As demonstrations continue over George Floyd's death, activist Curtis Hayes is challenging protesters to "come up with a better way" and urging everyone to ask why these protests are happening in the first place. He joined CBSN to discuss the fight against racial injustice.

  • Minneapolis police chief filed a civil suit against the department in 2007 alleging discrimination against people of color, including black officers
    INSIDER

    Minneapolis police chief filed a civil suit against the department in 2007 alleging discrimination against people of color, including black officers

    The Minneapolis Police Department Chief filed a civil suit against the department alleging discrimination against people of color including black officers in 2007, CNN reported. Excessive force complaints against Minneapolis officers were common, specifically from African-American residents, The New York Times reported. Derek Chauvin, the ex-police officer charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter tied to George Floyd's death had 18 complaints against him prior to the incident.

  • The New Top Prosecutor in Ukraine Has Joe Biden in Her Sights
    The Daily Beast

    The New Top Prosecutor in Ukraine Has Joe Biden in Her Sights

    On the night of May 19, Venediktova personally approved the beginning of criminal proceedings against former President Petro Poroshenko for high treason and abuse of office. The move was triggered by leaked recordings of confidential conversations that allegedly took place in 2015-2016 between Poroshenko and then Vice President Biden, as well as John Kerry, who was the U.S. secretary of state at the time. Before her appointment as prosecutor general in March, Venediktova—a graduate of Ukraine's police academy who holds the rank of captain—had served Zelensky as acting chief of the State Bureau of Investigations (DBR).

  • In aftermath of George Floyd's death, San Diego police will 'immediately' end use of carotid restraint
    USA TODAY

    In aftermath of George Floyd's death, San Diego police will 'immediately' end use of carotid restraint

    The San Diego Police Department, spurred by the fallout from George Floyd's death in Minneapolis, has immediately banned a controversial restraint technique. At least three major police departments have banned similar neck holds or chokeholds amid increasing attention on policing maneuvers that cut off oxygen to persons under arrest or restraint. Former Minneapolis officer Derek Chauvin used a similarly controversial knee-to-neck restraint, pressing his knee into Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes, resulting his death.

  • Iranian 'spy' scientist flies home after release from US prison, raising hopes of prisoner swap
    The Telegraph

    Iranian 'spy' scientist flies home after release from US prison, raising hopes of prisoner swap

    The families of British dual nationals imprisoned by Iran today criticised the Foreign Office for “complete inaction” in trying to secure their release, as an Iranian scientist previously jailed by the US was allowed to fly home. A plane carrying Sirous Asgari took off early this morning and was on its way back to Tehran to bring him home, Iran's foreign minister announced, raising hopes of a potential prisoner swap for Western dual nationals in Iran. Mr Asgari was accused by a US court in 2016 of stealing trade secrets while on an academic visit to Ohio, where he visited a university working on projects for the US Navy.

  • Black Liberty U. alums rebuke Falwell after blackface tweet
    Associated Press

    Black Liberty U. alums rebuke Falwell after blackface tweet

    Nearly three dozen black alumni of Liberty University denounced school President Jerry Falwell Jr. on Monday, suggesting he step down after he mocked Virginia's mask-wearing requirement by invoking the blackface scandal that engulfed the state's governor last year. In a letter to Falwell, shared with The Associated Press, 35 faith leaders and former student-athletes told Falwell that his past comments “have repeatedly violated and misrepresented" Christian principles. “You have belittled staff, students and parents, you have defended inappropriate behaviors of politicians, encouraged violence, and disrespected people of other faiths,” they wrote, advising Falwell that “your heart is in politics more than Christian academia or ministry.”

  • Clashes at Paris protest against racism and deadly police violence
    AFP

    Clashes at Paris protest against racism and deadly police violence

    Clashes broke out between police and protesters in Paris on Tuesday after around 20,000 people defied a ban to rally over the 2016 death of a black man in police custody, galvanised by US demonstrations against racism and deadly police violence. The protesters used slogans from the American protest movement to call for justice for Adama Traore, whose death four years ago has been a rallying cause against police brutality in France. The demonstration, which came after the release of two differing medical reports into the cause of Traore's death, had been prohibited by police citing a coronavirus ban on gatherings of more than 10 people.

  • Appeals court mulls making Hillary Clinton testify on emails
    Politico

    Appeals court mulls making Hillary Clinton testify on emails

    As a federal appeals court grappled on Tuesday with a politically charged dispute that long ago faded from the headlines, one of the most urgent and politically polarizing legal fights of the moment seemed to lurk just below the surface. The official topic of Tuesday's arguments before the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals was Hillary Clinton's bid to avoid giving an in-person deposition to a conservative group about the subject that dogged her during her 2016 presidential bid: her use of a private email account and server during her tenure as secretary of state. Both the Clinton deposition dispute and the Flynn case imbroglio involve an obscure type of legal mechanism that is not currently a household word but may soon be, at least in Washington: mandamus.

  • Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel caught on hot mic amid unrest: 'If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care'
    NBC News

    Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel caught on hot mic amid unrest: 'If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care'

    Rep. Eliot Engel, a New York Democrat facing a tough primary challenge and questions about his absence from his district, was caught on a hot mic at a district event responding to unrest saying twice that he only wanted press coverage because of an electoral threat. “If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care,” Engel said to Ruben Diaz Jr., the Bronx borough president, at a Tuesday press conference responding to unrest and vandalism in his district related to the recent death of George Floyd. Diaz worried about having too many elected officials speak, but Engel pleaded with him for coverage.

  • Leaked documents reveal China withheld crucial information about the coronavirus at the start of the outbreak
    Business Insider

    Leaked documents reveal China withheld crucial information about the coronavirus at the start of the outbreak

    Xinhua via REUTERS China delayed the release of information about the coronavirus, according to a new investigation. Its health officials did not share the coronavirus genome until over a week after scientists in Chinese laboratories decoded it at the beginning of January. Beijing did not warn the World Health Organization that the virus passed between people until two weeks later.

  • The head of the Minneapolis police union called protests a 'terrorist movement' and blamed politicians for unrest in a leaked email
    INSIDER

    The head of the Minneapolis police union called protests a 'terrorist movement' and blamed politicians for unrest in a leaked email

    Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images In a leaked email, the president of the Minneapolis Federation of Police said the ongoing protests over the death of George Floyd were a "terrorist movement" that has occurred following a "long time build up which dates back years." Lt. Bob Kroll blamed politicians for the ongoing tension, specifically targeting Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey. The former police chief of Minneapolis called on Kroll to resign, and Frey said Kroll was "shockingly indifferent to his role in undermining that trust and support" of the police force.

  • Pakistan 'blasphemy' death row couple's plea for freedom
    BBC

    Pakistan 'blasphemy' death row couple's plea for freedom

    Their lawyer, Saif ul Malook, who also represented Asia Bibi, another Christian woman who had a death sentence for blasphemy successfully overturned, told the BBC the evidence used to convict the couple was deeply flawed. But, he warned, that judges can be "fearful" of acquitting suspects, in case they are targeted themselves by extremists. Court proceedings have also slowed in recent weeks as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Trump: GOP 'forced to seek another state' to host the Republican National Convention
    USA TODAY

    Trump: GOP 'forced to seek another state' to host the Republican National Convention

    While the Democratic Party is working to decide whether it will even have an in-person convention, Republicans are looking at changing the location of theirs to ensure a splashy event. President Donald Trump weighed Tuesday evening in a series of tweets, where he said Republicans were looking for a new state for their convention and criticized North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper for refusing "to guarantee that we can have use of the Spectrum Arena - Spend millions of dollars, have everybody arrive, and....then tell them they will not be able to gain entry." "Governor Cooper is still in Shelter-In-Place Mode, and not allowing us to occupy the arena as originally anticipated and promised," Trump wrote in a series of tweets.

  • Mexico's president says military is aiding missing students probe
    Reuters

    Mexico's president says military is aiding missing students probe

    Mexico's military is cooperating with a fresh probe into the 2014 disappearance of 43 student teachers, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Tuesday. The apparent massacre of the youths, whose remains are still being searched for, is widely believed to have been committed by corrupt police working with a violent drug gang, and has drawn international outrage. Lopez Obrador, who came into power in 2018, has vowed to uncover what really happened and examine the prior handling of the case, which led to one of the worst crises of his predecessor Enrique Pena Nieto's administration.

  • New York protests: Video shows NYPD officer being attacked in the Bronx
    The Independent

    New York protests: Video shows NYPD officer being attacked in the Bronx

    A video has emerged online appearing to show a New York Police Department (NYPD) officer being attacked by several people in the Bronx, New York, on Monday amidst the George Floyd protests. The footage, which was tweeted by the city's Sergeant's Benevolent Association appears to show an NYPD officer struggling on the ground with someone. A bystander then approaches the scene and seemingly throws an object at the officer.

  • Philippine exit from key US military pact 'suspended'
    AFP

    Philippine exit from key US military pact 'suspended'

    The Philippines has told the United States it is suspending its bid to break off a key military pact, the two allies said Tuesday in a sharp turnaround of President Rodrigo Duterte's foreign policy. Duterte in February gave notice to Washington he was axing the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) after accusing the US of interference in his internationally condemned narcotics crackdown. That began a 180-day countdown to ending the deal central to hundreds of joint military exercises with the US per year and a major component of their nearly 70-year-old alliance.

  • Virginia county pulls officers from DC after Trump photo-op
    Associated Press

    Virginia county pulls officers from DC after Trump photo-op

    A county in northern Virginia pulled its officers out of the District of Columbia Monday night after they played a supporting role in clearing protesters from a park outside the White House so the president could walk to a church for a photo opportunity. The Arlington County Board issued a statement Monday night saying its officers were used “for a purpose not worthy of our mutual aid obligations. Arlington officers joined a team of federal law enforcers using chemical agents and flash bangs to forcibly remove a large group of peaceful protesters from Lafayette Park.

  • The Soviet Union Pioneered Airborne Assault—But...
    The National Interest

    The Soviet Union Pioneered Airborne Assault—But...

    The official history of Russian and Soviet airborne forces began on August 2, 1930, when 12 parachutists were dropped during maneuvers in the Moscow Military District. Prior to maneuvers, the volunteers conducted several practice jumps during their six days of training under the tutelage of Air Force pilot Leonid Minov. Minov himself had only three jumps under his belt, having received his training in the United States only a short time before.

  • Online clothing retailer Stitch Fix is laying off 1,400 California employees and instead hiring in lower-cost cities like Austin and Minneapolis
    Business Insider

    Online clothing retailer Stitch Fix is laying off 1,400 California employees and instead hiring in lower-cost cities like Austin and Minneapolis

    Nick Otto for the Washington Post/Getty Images Online personal styling retailer Stitch Fix is laying off 1,400 California employees, or about 18% of its total workforce. The employees affected can stay with the San Francisco-based company if they relocate — Stitch Fix will start hiring for 2,000 positions in lower-cost cities this summer. The company said the layoffs are not related to the pandemic, but the public health crisis has dealt a blow to the retail industry.

  • Thousands across the UK, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Canada, and more condemn racism and demand justice at global Black Lives Matter protests
    INSIDER

    Thousands across the UK, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Canada, and more condemn racism and demand justice at global Black Lives Matter protests

    People have condemned racism and police brutality, and are demanding justice for 46-year-old Floyd. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. George Floyd spent the last few moments of his life on Monday lying on the ground, handcuffed, with his neck pinned under the knee of a white Minneapolis police officer who ordered him to "relax" as the 46-year-old black man gasped, "Please, I can't breathe."

  • 'Here to offer you grace': Protesters in Minneapolis bringing peace met with police force
    NBC News

    'Here to offer you grace': Protesters in Minneapolis bringing peace met with police force

    Ashley Phelps and Ahmad Eltawely developed a fast bond on Saturday, the night they fled tear gas and ran from advancing police who were pepper-spraying protesters. They had met for the first time earlier in the day at a peaceful protest and sit-in with thousands of demonstrators who were not involved in the burning of businesses and a police station on previous nights, said Eltawely, who had a microphone and passed it around for people to speak. That's not a demonstration, he said of the violence.

  • Tropical Storm Cristobal has formed in Gulf of Mexico and may approach US by weekend
    USA TODAY

    Tropical Storm Cristobal has formed in Gulf of Mexico and may approach US by weekend

    Tropical Storm Cristobal, already the third storm of this year's hurricane season, formed Tuesday afternoon off the coast of Mexico and could reach Texas, Louisiana or the Florida Panhandle by Friday or early next week, meteorologists say. The storm began as a tropical depression with heavy rainfall and flooding over Mexico and Central America. The National Hurricane Center issued a public advisory soon after the storm moved through the Gulf, 150 miles from Campeche, Mexico, warning that increased rainfall, flooding and potential mudslides can be expected in southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.