ASIAWATER 2020 Industrial Site Visit to Kuching Water Board's Batu Kitang Water Treatment Plant & Bengoh Dam

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Feb. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- The organiser of ASIAWATER 2020, 'the region's leading water and wastewater event for developing Asia,' organised today a site visit to the Batu Kitang Water Treatment Plant and Bengoh Dam, with support from the Ministry of Utilities Sarawak and in collaboration with Kuching Water Board (KWB). The site visit is part of the ASIAWATER 2020 media tour and marketing campaign in raising public awareness and providing insights on water resource management and water security.

Logo of Asiawater

 

Bengoh Dam

 

Group Photo at Batu Kitang Water Treatment Plant

The Batu Kitang Water Treatment Plant accounts for more than 98% of the total water supply for Kuching City aiming to meet the needs of 850,000 people in Kuching, Samarahan and parts of Serian with clean water through pipes that stretches for about 2400 km. On the other hand, Bengoh Dam, with a capacity of 144.1Mm3, is located approximately 40km south of Kuching.

This is the first ASIAWATER visit to Kuching, Sarawak and KWB's Batu Kitang Water Treatment Plant and Bengoh Dam was picked as the industrial site visit destination.

Ir. Chang Kuet Shian, Chairman of Malaysia Water Association (MWA) Sarawak Branch and also the Director of Jabatan Bekalan Air Luar Bandar Sarawak said, "We welcome ASIAWATER 2020 to Kuching with open arms and heart; I believe that through this industrial site visit we are able to raise awareness to the community and at the same time learn and share experiences that will help improve our services, promote innovation and best practices in overcoming water supply challenges. We are also honoured to have the MWA President, Datuk Ir. Abdul Kadir Bin Mohd Din, to grace this visit to our facilities."

Mr. Mohamad Sabari B. Shakeran, the General Manager of Kuching Water Board further added, "Kuching Water Board strongly supports and welcomes ASIAWATER 2020 to Kuching as it shares a great platform in building awareness and educating industry professionals in maintaining and sustaining clean water supply to both urban and rural areas."

Mrs. Eliane van Doorn, Regional Director Business Development - ASEAN, Informa Markets commented: "ASIAWATER has always been updating its content from year to year as the 11th edition will be seeing fresh and new content. Some of the content we will be covering this year are the Digital Transformation dialogue and the roundtable discussion amongst ASEAN region water leaders and experts."

"I also want to take this opportunity to inform about the revised event dates to provide better opportunities in light of COVID-19 and the world travel disruptions: ASIAWATER 2020 has been rescheduled from March 31- April 1, 2020 to November 30 - December 2, 2020 at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Center (KLCC)," added Mrs. Eliane van Doorn.

ASIAWATER 2020 is anticipated to host more than 1200 exhibitors from 32 countries and will have 10 major international and regional pavilions including Austria, Mainland China, Bavaria, Germany, South Korea, the Netherlands, Singapore, Switzerland, Taiwan, and The Water Environment Federation (WEF) USA.

The list of confirmed exhibiting companies includes Ebara Pumps Malaysia, Ranhill Water Divisions, George Kent Malaysia, TECHKEM Group, Endress Hauser, Molecor (SEA), Salcon Engineering, and many more.

Online registration is open. Please visit www.asiawater.org to find out how to register and more.

Notes to Editor

About ASIAWATER Expo & Forum (www.asiawater.org)

ASIAWATER Expo & Forum, the longest running and leading trade event for the water and wastewater industry, is organised by Informa Markets, a part of Informa PLC. It is held biennial in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It has continued to prove to be a one-stop regional hub and recognised by the most respected industry professionals. The event offers a stream of business opportunities while at the same time developing Asia's water infrastructure. ASIAWATER 2020 in its 11th edition will take place from 30 November to 2 December 2020 at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre.

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SOURCE Asiawater

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