Ask Tesla, Apple, Aurora Cannabis, and More Companies Questions

Say Contributor
Sound the alarms—and the Cisco hold music— it’s earnings call season! Earnings calls are when a company’s management gets on a public conference call with analysts to answer questions about what’s in its quarterly earnings report and what’s going on with the profits, losses, and anything else that might move the stock. Sometimes the calls are business as usual. And sometimes, well, they are not. And while analysts are the ones who do most of the question asking on earnings calls, we here at Say think a company's everyday shareholders, who are just as vested in its outlook, should also be able to have their questions answered. Since early 2019, we’ve been testing our Earnings Call question-and-answer platform with Tesla, which used Say to field questions from shareholders during its Q4 2018 and Q1 2019 calls, as well as during its annual shareholder meeting. Now we’re opening up the platform to investors in more companies, including Tesla, Apple, Spotify, Knoll, Activision Blizzard and Aurora Cannabis. Call Dates: Tesla 7/24 at 2:30 PM PST/5:30 EST Knoll 7/25 at 10 AM EST Apple 7/30 at 2 PM PST/5 PM EST Activision Blizzard 8/8 4:30 PM EST Aurora Cannabis 9/24 Time TBD Learn more: Who can participate: Any shareholder. Shares you've purchased through ETrade, Robinhood, or any other brokerage give you access. Even better, owning company shares indirectly through a mutual fund (like a retirement 401k) or ETF, also gives you access. Huh? People often aren't aware which companies are inside their mutual funds or ETFs, or that owning these funds even makes them an "investor" or a "shareholder." These titles are not just for wealthy or super-serious people who don't break into a cold sweat when they think about retiring. For example, funds from Vanguard and Fidelity can have shares hundreds of companies within them. Once you sign up with Say, we'll let you know exactly what you own inside your fund, whether it's Apple, Tesla, or another company. Basically, this means you may be able to participate in an Earnings Call and not even know it. How it works: Shareholders confirm their shares and can submit questions as well as vote for the ones they most want answered ahead of the call. The company might then answer a selection during the call. Will the company answer my question if it gets the most votes? Nope, not necessarily. It’s up to companies to decide which questions they’ll answer, if any. What happens to the Q&A; forum or my questions after a call’s over? They’ll stay archived on Say’s site and remain viewable and shareable. Questions that are answered will be flagged with the company's responses. Watch the video up-top to take a spin through the platform and ask away. --Elizabeth Thompson and Chloe Imus

Sound the alarms—and the Cisco hold music— it’s earnings call season! Earnings calls are when a company’s management gets on a public conference call with analysts to answer questions about what’s in its quarterly earnings report and what’s going on with the profits, losses, and anything else that might move the stock. Sometimes the calls are business as usual. And sometimes, well, they are not. And while analysts are the ones who do most of the question asking on earnings calls, we here at Say think a company's everyday shareholders, who are just as vested in its outlook, should also be able to have their questions answered. Since early 2019, we’ve been testing our Earnings Call question-and-answer platform with Tesla, which used Say to field questions from shareholders during its Q4 2018 and Q1 2019 calls, as well as during its annual shareholder meeting. Now we’re opening up the platform to investors in more companies, including Tesla, Apple, Spotify, Knoll, Activision Blizzard and Aurora Cannabis. Call Dates: Tesla 7/24 at 2:30 PM PST/5:30 EST Knoll 7/25 at 10 AM EST Apple 7/30 at 2 PM PST/5 PM EST Activision Blizzard 8/8 4:30 PM EST Aurora Cannabis 9/24 Time TBD Learn more: Who can participate: Any shareholder. Shares you've purchased through ETrade, Robinhood, or any other brokerage give you access. Even better, owning company shares indirectly through a mutual fund (like a retirement 401k) or ETF, also gives you access. Huh? People often aren't aware which companies are inside their mutual funds or ETFs, or that owning these funds even makes them an "investor" or a "shareholder." These titles are not just for wealthy or super-serious people who don't break into a cold sweat when they think about retiring. For example, funds from Vanguard and Fidelity can have shares hundreds of companies within them. Once you sign up with Say, we'll let you know exactly what you own inside your fund, whether it's Apple, Tesla, or another company. Basically, this means you may be able to participate in an Earnings Call and not even know it. How it works: Shareholders confirm their shares and can submit questions as well as vote for the ones they most want answered ahead of the call. The company might then answer a selection during the call. Will the company answer my question if it gets the most votes? Nope, not necessarily. It’s up to companies to decide which questions they’ll answer, if any. What happens to the Q&A forum or my questions after a call’s over? They’ll stay archived on Say’s site and remain viewable and shareable. Questions that are answered will be flagged with the company's responses. Watch the video up-top to take a spin through the platform and ask away. --Elizabeth Thompson and Chloe Imus