Giants say Aubrey Huff won't be invited to 2010 World Series reunion after 'unacceptable' tweets

Jack Baer
Writer
The Giants don't seem eager to associate themselves with Aubrey Huff these days. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

The San Francisco Giants’ 10-year reunion of their 2010 World Series championship team will convene on Aug. 16 this year, but with a notable exception.

Aubrey Huff, the 2010 Giants’ starting first baseman and leader in home runs, will not be invited to the ceremony due to a number of comments he has made on social media, the team said in a statement released to The Athletic’s Andrew Baggarly:

“Earlier this month, we reached out to Aubrey Huff to let him know that he will not be included in the upcoming 2010 World Series Championship reunion. Aubrey has made multiple comments on social media that are unacceptable and run counter to the values of our organization. While we appreciate the many contributions that Aubrey made to the 2010 championship season, we stand by our decision,” the Giants said in a statement emailed to The Athletic when asked specifically if Huff would be invited to the reunion.

Among those comments are a denouncement of the Giants hiring Alyssa Nakken, the first female coach in MLB history, and saying the hire’s locker room reception has “#metoo & #BelieveAllWomen written all over it.”

Huff has been vocal for years on Twitter about a number of political and social topics, including almost daily tweets supporting President Donald Trump. Among his other tweets are comments on the “sexual market value” of men and women, mockery of transgender pronouns, condemnation of divorce alimony for athletes and scribbles of Conor McGregor beating up a liberal then high-fiving Trump.

Despite all that, Huff said he was surprised to get the cold shoulder from the team in quite possibly the most liberal media market in the country.

“Quite frankly, shocked. Disappointed. If it wasn’t for me, they wouldn’t be having a reunion,” Huff said. “But if they want to stick with their politically correct, progressive bulls---, that’s fine.”

Of course, it’s probably worth wondering if not wanting to be associated with a person who tweets statements like “Let’s kidnap 10 Iranian women and make them feed us grapes” might not be political correctness so much as basic common sense.

Huff later insisted that tweet was a joke, but it might say something about your public reputation when people aren’t quite sure if you’re serious about kidnapping Iranian women.

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