How to avoid fees when cashing stimulus check

Help is now available people without bank accounts when they cash their stimulus checks.

  • Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'
    Yahoo News

    Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'

    Democratic lawmakers in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives are demanding answers after learning that one of their Republican colleagues tested positive for COVID-19, shared that information with GOP leadership, but never informed them. On May 20, Republican Rep. Andrew Lewis learned he had tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Two other Republican House members who came in contact with Lewis were told to self-quarantine for 14 days, but Democratic lawmakers, some of whom also had contact with Lewis or with the two other Republicans before May 20, say they first learned of the positive test result on Wednesday.

  • How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?
    Yahoo News 360

    How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

    China's legislature on Thursday approved a controversial national security law that gives the mainland government new powers to police subversion and foreign intervention in Hong Kong. Critics of the new law say it's a violation of the “one country, two systems” agreement that has granted Hong Kong certain levels of autonomy — like its own police force and judicial system — since the island became part of China in 1997 after more than a century of British rule. Similar laws have been pursued by pro-Beijing members of Hong Kong's legislature several times in recent years, but none were passed.

  • Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi
    The Telegraph

    Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

    The killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province.

  • George Floyd death: Ex-officer charged with murder in Minneapolis
    BBC

    George Floyd death: Ex-officer charged with murder in Minneapolis

    A former Minneapolis police officer has been arrested and charged with murder and manslaughter following the death of an unarmed black man in custody. Derek Chauvin was shown in footage kneeling on George Floyd's neck. The case has reignited US anger over police killings of black Americans.

  • Coronavirus quietly started spreading as early as January, CDC says
    NBC News

    Coronavirus quietly started spreading as early as January, CDC says

    The coronavirus began quietly spreading in the U.S. as early as late January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday — before President Donald Trump blocked air travel from China and a full month before community spread was first detected in the country. It was also the first media briefing from the CDC in more than two months. "As America begins to reopen, looking back at how COVID-19 made its way to the United States will contribute to a better understanding to prepare for the future," Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the CDC, said Friday during a call with reporters.

  • It's a bad week to be named Amy Cooper
    INSIDER

    It's a bad week to be named Amy Cooper

    Several women named Amy Cooper have found themselves on the receiving end of online hate this week. People have mistaken those women for the Amy Cooper who called the police on a Central Park bird-watcher. Two women named Amy Cooper told Insider that when the messages started rolling in, they weren't yet familiar with the now-infamous incident.

  • Greece to open airports to arrivals from 29 countries from June 15
    AFP Relax News

    Greece to open airports to arrivals from 29 countries from June 15

    Greece said Friday it would reopen its airports in Athens and Thessaloniki to arrivals from 29 countries from June 15, the start of the tourist season. Visitors would be allowed to fly into Greece from 16 EU countries, including Germany, Austria, Denmark, Finland, the Czech Republic, Baltic countries, Cyprus and Malta, the tourism ministry said in a statement. Outside the European Union, holidaymakers from Switzerland, Norway, and neighbouring Balkan countries such as Albania, Serbia and North Macedonia will be allowed to land at Greece's main airports from June 15.

  • Photos of mass graves in Brazil show the stark toll of the coronavirus, as experts predict that it will surpass 125,000 deaths by August
    Business Insider

    Photos of mass graves in Brazil show the stark toll of the coronavirus, as experts predict that it will surpass 125,000 deaths by August

    The University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, which also forecasts the US death toll and has been used by the White House, has estimated that if no changes are enacted, 125,833 people in Brazil could die from the coronavirus by August 4. As of Wednesday, the country had 25,598 reported deaths. The same model projects that the US will reach 131,967 deaths by August 4.

  • ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium
    AFP

    ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium

    The International Criminal Court on Thursday said former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo can leave Belgium under certain conditions following his acquittal last year over post-electoral violence that killed 3,000 people. Gbagbo and his deputy Charles Ble Goude were both cleared of crimes against humanity a year ago, eight years after the former West African strongman's arrest and transfer to the Hague-based court. Belgium agreed to host Gbagbo, 73, after he was released in February last year under strict conditions including that he would return to court for a prosecution appeal against his acquittal.

  • New report alleges killings, mass detentions in Ethiopia
    Associated Press

    New report alleges killings, mass detentions in Ethiopia

    A new report by the rights group Amnesty International accuses Ethiopia's security forces of extrajudicial killings and mass detentions even as the country's reformist prime minister was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The report issued Friday says security forces killed at least 25 people in 2019 in the East Guji and West Guji zones of the restive Oromia region amid suspicions of supporting a rebel group, the Oromo Liberation Army, and a once-exiled opposition group. And at least 10,000 people under suspicion were detained between January and September, with most “subjected to brutal beatings."

  • Trump orders his administration to begin eliminating Hong Kong privileges
    Reuters

    Trump orders his administration to begin eliminating Hong Kong privileges

    U.S. President Donald Trump said on Friday he was directing his administration to begin the process of eliminating special treatment for Hong Kong, in response to China's plans to impose new security legislation in the territory. Trump made the announcement at a White House news conference, saying China had broken its word over Hong Kong's autonomy. He said its move against Hong Kong was a tragedy for the people of Hong Kong, China and the world.

  • Marauding monkeys attack lab technician and steal Covid-19 tests
    The Telegraph

    Marauding monkeys attack lab technician and steal Covid-19 tests

    A band of marauding monkeys has attacked a laboratory technician and stolen three Covid-19 test samples, raising fears they will infect themselves and then spread the deadly disease to humans. The worker was attacked outside a medical college in Meerut, northern India, while transporting samples from patients suspected of having coronavirus. Others saw the funny side of the monkey attack, with the incident coming days after the Indian authorities detained a pigeon in Jammu & Kashmir on suspicion of spying for Pakistan.

  • Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008
    The Daily Beast

    Minneapolis Man: Cop Who Kneeled on George Floyd ‘Tried to Kill Me’ in 2008

    Ira Latrell Toles didn't immediately recognize Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin in the now-viral video of him holding his knee on George Floyd's neck as the handcuffed black man repeatedly told him he couldn't breathe. But when news outlets identified the officers involved, Toles, 33, realized the man responsible for Floyd's death was the same police officer who barged into his home and beat him up in the bathroom before shooting him in the stomach 12 years earlier while responding to a domestic violence call. The officer that killed that guy might be the one that shot me,” Toles texted his sister on Tuesday night, according to messages shared with The Daily Beast.

  • SpaceX rocket launch could have ‘triggered lightning’, Nasa says
    The Independent

    SpaceX rocket launch could have ‘triggered lightning’, Nasa says

    The launch of a SpaceX rocket could have "triggered lightning" and so had to be cancelled, Nasa has said. The mission would have seen the first launch of astronauts from US soil in nine years, and the first ever private company to put humans into space. But it was cancelled just minutes before lift-off, amid looming rain and thunderstorms over the launchpad.

  • A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers
    INSIDER

    A pharmacist known as 'the Mask Man' has been charged with hoarding $200,000 worth of N95 masks and price-gouging customers

    A New York pharmacist bought up $200,000 worth of N95 masks before the coronavirus pandemic grew severe in the US, then sold them at up to a 50% markup, prosecutors allege. The pharmacist, 66-year-old Richard Schirripa, sold more than $2,000 worth of masks to an undercover officer, and said during the transaction he felt "like a drug dealer standing out here." Schirripa has been arrested and charged with violating the Defense Production Act by hoarding and price-gouging.

  • One of the coldest places on Earth is experiencing a record-breaking heat wave
    NBC News

    One of the coldest places on Earth is experiencing a record-breaking heat wave

    One of the coldest regions on Earth has been experiencing a record-breaking heat wave in recent weeks amid growing fears about devastating wildfires and melting permafrost. Khatanga, a town in Siberia's Arctic Circle, registered highs of over 80 degrees Fahrenheit this week, according to Accuweather, far above the 59 degrees F historical average, as the whole of western Siberia basked in unseasonable warmth. While locals flocked to popular spots to sunbathe, experts sounded alarms about the possible implications for the region's wildfire season this summer, with some blazes already breaking out in recent months.

  • Minneapolis mayor responds after night of protests and violence in wake of George Floyd's death
    Yahoo News Video

    Minneapolis mayor responds after night of protests and violence in wake of George Floyd's death

    At a press conference on Thursday, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said protests and unrest after the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man seen on video pinned to the ground by the neck while being arrested by a white police officer, were the result of “built-up anger and sadness” in the black community over the past 400 years.

  • Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels
    AFP

    Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

    Iran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. The vessels included Ashura-class speedboats, Zolfaghar coastal patrol boats and Taregh submarines, state television reported. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran.

  • Fear and anger are growing inside United Airlines, where workers are slamming the company over pay cuts after it took billions of dollars in government bailout money
    Business Insider

    Fear and anger are growing inside United Airlines, where workers are slamming the company over pay cuts after it took billions of dollars in government bailout money

    AP Photo/Mary Altaffer United Airlines has cut work hours for its managers and administrative (M&A) employees, and warned that layoffs are coming. However, workers say that the cuts violate terms of the CARES Act bailout, prohibiting pay cuts or furloughs before September 30. Business Insider spoke with United M&A workers who described stress, anxiety, and frustration with the airline as they prepare for what could be massive job cuts.

  • Democrats want interviews with Trump admin officials over watchdog firing
    Reuters

    Democrats want interviews with Trump admin officials over watchdog firing

    U.S. Democratic lawmakers said on Friday they want to conduct closed-door interviews with officials from President Donald Trump's administration about the surprise firing of State Department Inspector General Steve Linick, and release transcripts to the public. Representatives Eliot Engel, chairman of the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee; Carolyn Maloney, chairwoman of the House Oversight Committee; and Senator Bob Menendez, ranking Democrat on Senate Foreign Relations, said they were expanding an investigation of Linick's May 15 dismissal.

  • The U.S. Might Revoke Hong Kong's 'Special Status.' Here's What That Means For Business in the Global Financial Hub
    Time

    The U.S. Might Revoke Hong Kong's 'Special Status.' Here's What That Means For Business in the Global Financial Hub

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced on Wednesday that Hong Kong was no longer sufficiently autonomous from mainland China — an assessment that could threaten the city's trading relationship with the U.S. and deal a blow to both American and Chinese companies operating there. The news comes following Beijing's decision late last week to draw up a national security law for Hong Kong. The move came after Hong Kong's Legislative Council failed in its obligations to enact such a law since the former British colony was handed back to China in 1997.

  • Long Island serial killer victim IDed 2 decades later
    Associated Press

    Long Island serial killer victim IDed 2 decades later

    A woman whose skeletal remains were found along a suburban New York beach highway, in an area where body parts of 10 other people had been strewn, was identified as a Philadelphia escort who went missing two decades ago, police said Thursday. Suffolk County police said the woman previously known as “Jane Doe No. 6” was identified through genetic genealogy technology as Valerie Mack, who also went by Melissa Taylor and was last seen in 2000 near Atlantic City, New Jersey. Determining the victim's identity has brought clarity to a long-running Long Island mystery that attracted national headlines, was featured on true-crime TV shows and was the subject of a recent Netflix film, Police Commissioner Geraldine Hart said.

  • Coronavirus: South Korea closes schools again after biggest spike in weeks
    BBC

    Coronavirus: South Korea closes schools again after biggest spike in weeks

    More than 200 schools in South Korea have been forced to close just days after they re-opened, due to a new spike in virus cases. Most of these cases have been linked to a distribution centre outside Seoul. The warehouse, in the city of Bucheon, is run by the country's biggest e-commerce firm Coupang, and officials have said the facility was not strictly complying with infection control measures.

  • The next 100 days: How the coronavirus will continue to change your life at home, at work, at school and beyond
    USA TODAY

    The next 100 days: How the coronavirus will continue to change your life at home, at work, at school and beyond

    It didn't take much longer than 100 days for the coronavirus to claim the lives of 100,000 Americans, an unimaginable toll when the first person in the U.S. died of COVID-19, believed to have happened Feb. 6 in California. The social distancing measures widely adopted throughout the country succeeded in slowing down the virus' spread, as borne out by the diminished rates of new infections and deaths in May – but not enough to keep the U.S. from reaching the grim milestone of 100,000 deaths Wednesday, according to the Johns Hopkins University data dashboard. USA TODAY consulted experts in a variety of fields, including public health, business, history, social sciences and the hospitality industry, to get an assessment of what the new normal may look like in the next 100 days.

  • Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report
    NBC News

    Senate Democrats take on GOP court-packing in blistering new report

    Senate Democrats on Wednesday unveiled a new report on Republican efforts to pack the courts with conservative-leaning judges and the outsized influence of one conservative activist. "Our report exposes a twisted web of dark money, and special interest groups who behind the scenes are investing millions and millions to plant ideological activist judges completely remake the courts, and ultimately rewrite the Constitution," said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. As part of their report, the senators pointed to activist Leonard Leo, the former head of the conservative Federalist Society, as the driving force behind the many of the president's appointments, including Supreme Court Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.