Baker to Washington: Less talk, more action

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker has a simple message for members of both political parties in the U.S. Senate: "Make a deal."

  • CDC's 'disease detectives' are on the coronavirus case 
    Yahoo News

    CDC's 'disease detectives' are on the coronavirus case 

    While the Washington State Department of Health had prepared a plan for the arrival of the virus that detailed how the state would obtain tests from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, what type of messaging it would release to citizens and how it would train staff at local health centers to handle the virus, it assumed it still had weeks before the disease would reach the U.S. To anticipate events like the coronavirus pandemic, the CDC established the Epidemic Intelligence Service, its elite “disease detective” training program. Over the course of two years, EIS officers receive immersive, on-the-job training — either at CDC headquarters, where they're assigned to focus on specific disease areas, or at state and local health departments around the country — to investigate every aspect of an outbreak like this one.

  • Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting
    Yahoo News

    Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting

    The New York Times reported this week that almost a dozen Liberty University students have come down with COVID-19 symptoms since the school reopened last week, according to a bombshell article published Sunday that cites a local physician in Lynchburg, Va., where the evangelical university is situated. “We've lost the ability to corral this thing,” Dr. Thomas W. Eppes Jr. said he told Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr., according to the article. The Times identified Eppes as the head of the school's student health service, but he does not appear on the Liberty University website and a school spokesman told Yahoo News he has no official connection to the university.

  • U.S. could rethink Iran sanctions in light of coronavirus: Pompeo
    Reuters

    U.S. could rethink Iran sanctions in light of coronavirus: Pompeo

    U.S Secretary of State Mike Pompeo held out the possibility on Tuesday that the United States may consider easing sanctions on Iran and other nations to help fight the coronavirus epidemic but gave no concrete sign it plans to do so. The comments reflected a shift in tone by the U.S. State Department, which has come under withering criticism for its hard line toward sanctions relief even in the face of a call by the U.N. secretary-general to ease U.S. economic penalties. Pompeo stressed that humanitarian supplies are exempt from sanctions Washington reimposed on Tehran after President Donald Trump abandoned Iran's 2015 multilateral deal to limit its nuclear program.

  • PA Man ‘Upset Over Coronavirus’ Shoots Girlfriend Before Turning Gun on Himself: Cops
    The Daily Beast

    PA Man ‘Upset Over Coronavirus’ Shoots Girlfriend Before Turning Gun on Himself: Cops

    A Pennsylvania man “extremely upset” about losing his job amidst the coronavirus pandemic allegedly shot his girlfriend, before turning the gun on himself in an attempted murder-suicide, authorities said Wednesday. The Wilson Borough Police Department said in a statement to The Daily Beast that Roderick Bliss IV, 38, attempted to fatally shoot his girlfriend with a semi-automatic pistol on Monday afternoon, before dying by suicide, after he “had become increasingly upset over the COVID-19 pandemic. The 43-year-old girlfriend, who was shot once in the back, survived the attack and is in St. Luke's hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

  • Iran warns U.S. over Iraq deployment amid virus
    Yahoo News Video

    Iran warns U.S. over Iraq deployment amid virus

    On Wednesday Iran warned the U.S. it was “warmongering during the coronavirus outbreak,” after it deployed Patriot air defense missiles to Iraq.

  • Coronavirus: US death toll exceeds 5,000
    BBC

    Coronavirus: US death toll exceeds 5,000

    State and local officials have complained about insufficient protective equipment such as masks and gowns as well as ventilators, needed to help keep patients breathing. Meanwhile, US Vice-President Mike Pence warned the US appeared to be on a similar trajectory as Italy where the death toll has exceeded 13,000 - the worst in the world. The number of confirmed infections across the US rose by more than 25,000 in one day.

  • Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault
    Associated Press

    Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault

    One of the motorcyclists in a crash that killed him and six fellow bikers on a north woods highway was drunk and actually was the one who hit a pickup and caused the accident, the lawyer for the truck driver charged with homicide said in a document made public Tuesday. A New Hampshire State Police account of the June 21 crash in the community of Randolph “was deeply flawed," the lawyer for truck driver Volodymyr Zhukovskyy, 24, of West Springfield, Massachusetts, said in a motion filed Friday that seeks a hearing to set him free on bail. State police initially determined that the flatbed trailer he was hauling was 1 1/2 feet over the center line at the time of impact, the motion said.

  • Army attack helicopters teamed up with Navy ships to practice holding enemies 'at high risk' in the Middle East
    Business Insider

    Army attack helicopters teamed up with Navy ships to practice holding enemies 'at high risk' in the Middle East

    US Navy/MCS 3rd Class Matthew F. Jackson In March, US Navy surface ships, including a destroyer, worked with Army Apache helicopters to practice responding to threats at sea. The addition of Army aircraft expands the Navy's ability to do reconnaissance and to hold threats at bay, a Navy officer said. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

  • Six-week-old newborn dies of coronavirus in US: state governor
    AFP

    Six-week-old newborn dies of coronavirus in US: state governor

    A six-week-old infant has died of complications relating to COVID-19, the governor of the US state of Connecticut said Wednesday, in one of the youngest recorded deaths from the virus. Governor Ned Lamont tweeted that the newborn was "brought unresponsive to a hospital late last week and could not be revived." "Testing confirmed last night that the newborn was COVID-19 positive," Lamont said.

  • Americans masking up against coronavirus — 'no harm to it,' Trump says
    Yahoo News

    Americans masking up against coronavirus — 'no harm to it,' Trump says

    With the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 surging nationwide and health officials warning that, even in a best-case scenario, deaths from the disease could top 100,000 in the U.S., the government is reviewing its guidance on the use of face masks by the general population. Asked at Tuesday's press briefing of the White House coronavirus task force whether U.S. citizens should wear face masks, President Trump signaled that additional protection is “not a bad idea” and offered an alternative to medically approved masks, which are in short supply. My feeling is that if people want to do it, there's certainly no harm to it.

  • ‘We Didn’t Know That Until the Last 24 Hours’: Georgia Gov. Says He Just Found Out People Without Symptoms Can Spread Coronavirus
    National Review

    ‘We Didn’t Know That Until the Last 24 Hours’: Georgia Gov. Says He Just Found Out People Without Symptoms Can Spread Coronavirus

    While announcing a statewide shelter-in-place order on Wednesday, Georgia governor Brian Kemp, a Republican, said that he had just been informed that asymptomatic individuals could spread the coronavirus. The illness “is now transmitting before people see signs….Those individuals could have been infecting people before they ever felt [symptoms],” Kemp said at a press conference. It has been widely known for months that the coronavirus can spread through asymptomatic transmission.

  • Differing death tolls in California and Louisiana hint at the urgency to 'flatten the curve'
    NBC News

    Differing death tolls in California and Louisiana hint at the urgency to 'flatten the curve'

    The two states have instituted increasingly restrictive measures and are among the 23 states with stay-at-home orders. Both states are led by Democratic governors who have earned praise from President Donald Trump for their response to the crisis. The disease is still spreading in both states, and the number of new cases and deaths reported each day is still climbing.

  • Great Recession showed countries can’t fight the coronavirus economic crisis alone
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Great Recession showed countries can’t fight the coronavirus economic crisis alone

    As the world economy enters an unprecedented crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and policymakers in Washington and other global capitals prepare record fiscal stimulus plans, stakeholders should heed an important lesson from the last financial downturn in 2008: Recovery is only possible through coordinated global action. A little more than 10 years ago, as the world was entering the Great Recession, stakeholders had to look far back in the rearview mirror to the Great Depression for policy guidance. While the actions of the 1930s did offer important lessons for 2008 — most notably the need to expand the money supply — the economy of the 1930s was fundamentally different than the global economy of the early part of this century.

  • Taliban team arrives in Kabul to begin prisoner exchange process
    Reuters

    Taliban team arrives in Kabul to begin prisoner exchange process

    A three-member Taliban team arrived in Kabul on Tuesday to begin a prisoner exchange process pivotal to starting talks between the insurgents and the government side to end Afghanistan's 18-year-old war. The peace talks, known as the intra-Afghan dialogue, were envisaged in an agreement between the United States and the Taliban signed in Doha, which also stipulated an exchange of 6,000 prisoners held by the Afghan government and the Taliban. "Our three-member technical team will help the process of prisoners' release by identification of the prisoners, (and) their transportation," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid told Reuters.

  • Shenzhen becomes first Chinese city to ban eating cats and dogs
    BBC

    Shenzhen becomes first Chinese city to ban eating cats and dogs

    Shenzhen has become the first Chinese city to ban the sale and consumption of dog and cat meat. It comes after the coronavirus outbreak was linked to wildlife meat, prompting Chinese authorities to ban the trade and consumption of wild animals. Shenzhen went a step further, extending the ban to dogs and cats.

  • 12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture
    Architectural Digest

    12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture

    From Zaha Hadid's majestic MAXII in Italy to the stunning beauty of Frank Gehry's Vitra Design Museum, these structures elevate the environment they were built in Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Gun background checks smash records amid coronavirus fears
    Associated Press

    Gun background checks smash records amid coronavirus fears

    Background checks required to buy firearms have spiked to record numbers in the past month, fueled by a run on guns from Americans worried about their safety during the coronavirus crisis. According to figures from the FBI, 3.7 million background checks were done in March — the most for a single month since the system began in 1998. Background checks are the key barometer of gun sales, but the FBI's monthly figures also incorporate checks for firearm permits that are required in some states.

  • Amazon says it will investigate after we obtained a photo appearing to show a lack of social distancing at Indiana warehouse
    Business Insider

    Amazon says it will investigate after we obtained a photo appearing to show a lack of social distancing at Indiana warehouse

    Reuters Amazon has implemented a number of social distancing policies amid the coronavirus pandemic, but employees say the reality does not always match the rhetoric. A worker at an Amazon warehouse in Indiana sent Business Insider a photo that they allege shows managers huddled at a table next to a sign that states, "Please work together to ensure social distancing is happening." Amazon told Business Insider that it will investigate the incident.

  • Coronavirus live updates: US braces for 'horrific' weeks as deaths top 5,100; unemployment claims soar; Dr. Fauci gets security
    USA TODAY

    Coronavirus live updates: US braces for 'horrific' weeks as deaths top 5,100; unemployment claims soar; Dr. Fauci gets security

    Jobless numbers soared and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's preeminent coronavirus expert, required a security detail Thursday as the nation braced for what President Donald Trump predicted would be a "horrific" couple of weeks. More than 1,000 people died of the coronavirus in the United States on Wednesday alone, raising the death toll over 5,000. “This is eye watering and we are still only at the beginning of the layoffs spurred by the lockdowns throughout the country," said James McCann, senior global economist at Aberdeen Standard Investments.

  • Feds Find Smuggling Tunnel Linking San Diego to Tijuana, Seize $29 Million in Drugs
    National Review

    Feds Find Smuggling Tunnel Linking San Diego to Tijuana, Seize $29 Million in Drugs

    Federal immigration authorities have discovered a drug smuggling tunnel leading from San Diego under the U.S.-Mexico border and seized nearly $30 million worth of drugs found inside. Federal agents on the San Diego Tunnel Task Force discovered the “sophisticated” tunnel on Thursday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement said in a release Tuesday. The discovery resulted from a joint investigation by members of the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Border Patrol, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. Attorney's Office.

  • WHO concerned by 'rapid escalation' of virus, as U.S. death toll nears 5,000
    NBC News

    WHO concerned by 'rapid escalation' of virus, as U.S. death toll nears 5,000

    The head of the World Health Organization has voiced deep concern over the “rapid escalation” and global spread of the new coronavirus pandemic, as the United States nears a grim milestone of 5,000 deaths. The stark warning comes as the United States barrels towards marking 5,000 coronavirus-related deaths, with more than 4,800 already recorded across the country as of early Thursday morning. Having first emerged in China in December, four months later it is the United States that has registered by far the highest number of coronavirus cases, more than 210,000 as of Thursday, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

  • Iran warns of months of crisis as virus deaths reach 3,160
    AFP

    Iran warns of months of crisis as virus deaths reach 3,160

    Iran on Thursday reported 124 new deaths from the coronavirus, raising its total to 3,160, as President Rouhani warned that the country may still battle the pandemic for another year. Health ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour announced the latest toll in a news conference and confirmed 3,111 new infections over the past 24 hours, bringing Iran's total to 50,468. Iran has been scrambling to contain the COVID-19 outbreak since it reported its first cases on February 19.

  • US asks Juan Guaido to renounce claim to Venezuela leadership – for the time being
    The Independent

    US asks Juan Guaido to renounce claim to Venezuela leadership – for the time being

    The United States has called on Venezuela's Juan Guaido to temporarily renounce his claim to the presidency as it recalibrates its strategy to oust leader Nicolas Maduro. The shift came after more than a year of faltering US-led efforts to oust the leftist Mr Maduro. Mr Guaido came under growing pressure from authorities, who on Tuesday summoned him to answer charges of attempting a coup.

  • China's Shenzhen bans the eating of cats and dogs after coronavirus
    Reuters

    China's Shenzhen bans the eating of cats and dogs after coronavirus

    The Chinese city of Shenzhen has banned the eating of dogs and cats as part of a wider clampdown on the wildlife trade since the emergence of the new coronavirus. Scientists suspect the coronavirus passed to humans from animals. Some of the earliest infections were found in people who had exposure to a wildlife market in the central city of Wuhan, where bats, snakes, civets and other animals were sold.

  • Coronavirus: India's race to build a low-cost ventilator to save Covid-19 patients
    BBC

    Coronavirus: India's race to build a low-cost ventilator to save Covid-19 patients

    In an 8,000 sq ft (743 sq m) facility in the western Indian city of Pune, a bunch of young engineers are racing against time to develop a low-cost ventilator that could save thousands of lives if the coronavirus pandemic overwhelms the country's hospitals. These engineers - from some of India's top engineering schools - belong to a barely two-year-old start-up which makes water-less robots that clean solar plants. Last year, Nocca Robotics had a modest turnover of 2.7 million rupees ($36,000; £29,000).