Ballogy Teams Up With PGC Basketball To Launch Online Shooting College Course

Leading Basketball Program Helps Players Train at Home Via the Ballogy App

Ballogy Inc., the innovative software company revolutionizing the way youth and amateur athletes prepare for their sports, today announced it is partnering with PGC Basketball (PGC), the largest educational basketball program in the world, to launch a virtual shooting course for aspiring basketball players.

PGC Online Shooting College participants will be a part of a 2-week, shooting intensive course, designed to help players develop and discover what it takes to become an elite-level shooter. Players will get access to exclusive daily instruction, workouts and assessments, while also receiving feedback from PGC directors, all via the Ballogy app.

"PGC has been dedicated to equipping and inspiring players and coaches throughout our 28-year history, and we’re excited that the Ballogy app provides a new way for us to offer innovative online courses," said Mano Watsa, president of PGC Basketball. "The Ballogy app’s functionality aligns with our commitment to engage players in a way that’s most useful to them."

Ballogy’s unique mobile player training app and built-in certified testing program leverages data science and machine learning to enable youth and amateur athletes at any skill level to track their athletic development and measurably improve their performance over time. The Ballogy app also offers an interactive and engaging forum for individuals to connect, compete, and network with their peers, pro players, and coaches. The Ballogy app is free for download on Google Play and the Apple App Store.

"We are extremely honored to be partnering with PGC to connect their coaches and athletes as they continue to train and improve their skills," said Todd Young, founder and CEO of Ballogy. "As our partners seek continuity in the absence of face-to-face instruction, it’s exciting to see them embrace our technology to virtualize their camps and workouts."

For more information about PGC virtual camps, please visit https://pgcbasketball.com/virtual-camps/.

About Ballogy

Ballogy is an innovative software company revolutionizing the way youth and amateur athletes prepare for their sports. Ballogy’s unique performance tracking and analysis app and built-in certified testing program, enable young athletes to measure and evaluate their athletic development and improve their skills at every level of the game. Ballogy also provides a forum for individual players to connect, compete, network, and share with coaches, schools and teammates, via an easy-to-use app, giving young athletes visibility and access like never before. The Ballogy app is available for free in Google Play and the App Store. https://www.ballogy.com

About Point Guard College Basketball (PGC)

PGC Basketball is the worldwide leader in teaching players to think the game, be a leader, and run the show. Over 100,000 players and 7,500 coaches have been through a PGC course or clinic over the past 28 years. PGC's mission is to be a light in the basketball world, and to inspire and equip players and coaches to have a rewarding, fulfilling career. https://pgcbasketball.com/

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200604005399/en/

Contacts

Jill Ford
jill@ballogy.com
512-657-8915

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