Barbie reveals Anna May Wong doll for AAPI Heritage Month

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Mattel celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month with a new Anna May Wong Barbie doll.

The announcement was made on Monday through Barbie’s official Instagram account.

Complete with the icon’s signature bangs and eyebrows, Wong’s doll is dressed in a floor-length red gown with golden dragon details. The look was inspired by the actor’s appearance in the American crime film “Limehouse Blues” (1934).

https://www.instagram.com/reel/Crs5ouruRXR/?igshid=MDJmNzVkMjY%3D

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The Anna May Wong doll is the latest addition to the Barbie Inspiring Women series, which has previously recreated iconic female figures such as journalist Ida B. Wells and author Maya Angelou.

The series selected Wong to “spotlight the courageous life and legacy” of the actress who “changed the course of Asian representation in Hollywood and left an indelible stamp on audiences around the globe.”

The doll retails for $35 and will ship out on June 30, according to the product's website.

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According to Associated Press, Wong’s niece, Anna Wong, gave her blessing and was heavily involved in the doll’s creation.

“I did not hesitate at all. It was such an honor and so exciting,” she said. “I wanted to make sure they got her facial features and clothing correct. And they did!”

Anna May Wong, whose full name was Wong Liu Tsong, was born in Los Angeles, California, to second-generation Chinese American parents. Beginning her career during the silent film era, she would become an international star as well as a fashion icon, especially for her flapper look.

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Known as the first Chinese American actor in Hollywood, Wong would also reject Hollywood’s stereotypical Asian roles, leaving for Europe in search of representation. Wong would also spend time touring China, documenting her experience as a female director.

After making her mark with her roles in “Dragon Lady” and “Piccadilly,” Wong died in 1961 at the age of 56 from a heart attack.

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