Barr sees no sign of major U.S. vote fraud

U.S. Attorney General Bill Barr was spotted on the White House grounds on Tuesday, shortly after telling the Associated Press that the Justice Department had found no evidence of widespread voter fraud in the presidential election, saying: "To date, we have not seen fraud on a scale that could have affected a different outcome in the election."

Barr, an appointee of President Donald Trump who is widely seen as loyal to the president, is the most prominent Trump ally and highest Trump administration official to cast doubt on the president's baseless claims that the election was stolen from him.

The Trump campaign quickly responded to Barr's comments, with attorneys Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis saying in a joint statement: "With all due respect to the Attorney General, there hasn't been any semblance of a Department of Justice investigation... Nonetheless, we will continue our pursuit of the truth."

Last month, Barr told federal prosecutors to pursue investigations into credible allegations of election fraud, but warned them to avoid probes into "fanciful or far-fetched claims."

GABRIEL STERLING: "It has all gone too far."

Barr's comments on Tuesday came as Gabriel Sterling, a top election official in Georgia, made an impassioned plea directly to the president to stop fanning unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud, saying people's safety was at risk.

STERLING: "Mr. President, it looks like you likely lost the state of Georgia. We're investigating. There's always the possibility. I get it. And you have the rights to go through the courts. What you don't have the ability to do, and you need to step up and say this, is stop inspiring people to commit potential acts of violence. Someone's going to get hurt. Someone's going to get shot. Someone's going to get killed."

Sterling, a Republican who works for Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger as the manager of Georgia's voting systems, said the straw that broke the camel's back for him was threats of violence against a young election contractor and implored the president and the state's two Republican senators to take action.

STERLING: "A 20-something tech in Gwinnett County today has death threats and a noose put out saying he should be hung for treason... It has to stop."

Last week, Trump publicly labeled Raffensperger, who is also a Republican, an "enemy of the people." And on Monday, one of the president's attorneys called in to a cable news show to say that Christopher Krebs, the former head of U.S. election security who was fired by Trump, should be "taken out at dawn and shot."

STERLING: "There are some nutballs out there who are going to take this and say, 'The president told me to do this.' You have to be responsible."

A Trump campaign spokesman said it was only trying to make sure "that all legal votes are counted and all illegal votes are not," adding "No one should engage in threats or violence, and if that has happened, we condemn that fully."

Video Transcript

- US attorney General Bill Barr was spotted on the White House grounds on Tuesday, shortly after telling the "Associated Press" that the Justice Department had found no evidence of widespread voter fraud in the presidential election, saying, quote, "to date, we have not seen fraud on a scale that could have effected a different outcome in the election." Barr, an appointee of President Donald Trump who is widely seen as loyal to the president, is the most prominent Trump ally and highest Trump administration official to cast doubt on the president's baseless claims that the election was stolen from him.

The Trump campaign quickly responded to Barr's comments, with attorneys Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis saying in a joint statement, quote, "with all due respect to the attorney general, there hasn't been any semblance of a Department of Justice investigation. Nonetheless, we will continue our pursuit of the truth." Last month, Barr told federal prosecutors to pursue investigations into credible allegations of election fraud, but warned them to avoid probes into quote, "fanciful or far-fetched claims."

GABRIEL STERLING: It has all gone too far.

- Barr's comments on Tuesday came as Gabriel Sterling, a top election official in Georgia, made an impassioned plea directly to the president to stop fanning unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud, saying people's safety was at risk.

GABRIEL STERLING: Mr. President, it looks like you likely lost the state of Georgia. We're investigating. There's always a possibility. I get it. You have the rights to go through the courts. What you don't have the ability to do-- and you need to step up and say this-- is stop inspiring people to commit potential acts of violence. Someone's going to get hurt. Someone's going to get shot. Someone's going to get killed.

- Sterling, a Republican who works for Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger as the manager of Georgia's voting systems, said the straw that broke the camel's back for him was threats of violence against a young election contractor and implored the president and the state's two Republican senators to take action.

GABRIEL STERLING: A 20-something tech in Gwinnett County today has death threats and a noose put out, saying he should be hung for treason.

It has to stop.

- Last week, Trump publicly labeled Raffensperger, who is also a Republican, quote, "an enemy of the people." And on Monday, one of the president's attorneys called into a cable news show to say that Christopher Krebs, the former head of US election security who was fired by Trump, should be, quote, "taken out at dawn and shot."

GABRIEL STERLING: There are some nut balls out there who are going to take this and say, the president told me to do this. Essentially, you have to be responsible.

- A Trump campaign spokesman said it was only trying to make sure that all legal votes are counted and all illegal votes are not, adding, quote, "no one should engage in threats or violence. And if that has happened, we condemn that fully."