Colorado Bear Smashes Through Wall Like 'Kool-Aid Man'

A bear entered a Colorado home Friday night looking for deviled eggs, but its exit was straight out of a Kool-Aid commercial.

Estes Park homeowner John Sliwinski said the bear entered his house through an open door after smelling some goodies in the garbage.

“What had happened was we had put the trash in the house so it wouldn’t attract the bears and I should have closed the door,” he told Denver station KUSA TV.

Instead of closing the door, Sliwinski went upstairs for a few minutes, giving the hungry bear a chance to get inside and get some deviled eggs that were in the trash can.

However, things got tricky when the animal accidentally closed the door with the trash can and became stuck inside the home.

The bear did manage to get out by taking a lesson from one popular advertising icon, according to a Facebook post by the Estes Park Police Dept.: 

Upon officer’s arrival, said bear forcibly breached a hole in the wall like the “Kool-Aid Man” and made it’s escape.

The pitcher-shaped “Kool-Aid Man,” a mascot for flavored drink mix Kool-Aid, was known to burst through walls in commercials for the product and shout, “Oh, yeah!”

Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) told Fox News that bears have entered over 35 vehicles and nine homes in the Estes Park area northwest of Denver between July 24 and Aug. 3.

CPW says some bears are so used to finding food in vehicles that they will break into cars even when they can’t see or smell food.

Meanwhile, Sliwinski and his wife have a huge memento of their recent “guest” and some newfound knowledge about what not to do around bears.

“So, yeah, don’t put deviled eggs in your trash cans,” he told KUSA TV.

You can see more in the video below:

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