Benjamin Netanyahu was just indicted on fraud and bribery charges, becoming the first Israeli prime minister to be indicted in office

Eliza Relman
Benjamin Netanyahu

Ronen Zvulun/Pool Photo via AP


  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Thursday was indicted on bribery, fraud, and breach of trust charges in three corruption cases. 
  • Netanyahu is accused of receiving gifts and positive news coverage in exchange for regulatory benefits from the government. He is the first sitting Israeli prime minister ever to be indicted. 
  • He has denied all accusations of wrongdoing and argued that he's a victim of a political "witch-hunt" pushed by the left and the media. 
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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Thursday was indicted on bribery, fraud, and breach of trust charges in three corruption cases, Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit announced. 

Netanyahu, 70, is accused of offering or dangling government favors and regulatory benefits to media tycoons in exchange for gifts and positive news coverage. He is the first sitting Israeli prime minister ever to be indicted. 

The longest-serving Israeli prime minister in history, Netanyahu has denied all accusations of wrongdoing and argued that he's a victim of a political "witch-hunt" pushed by the left and the media. 

The indictments come at a politically turbulent time for Netanyahu, who has failed to form a government despite three attempts and two elections over the last seven months. 

Here's the details of each charge:

  • "Case 1,000," which concerns allegations that Netanyahu and his wife, Sara, had accepted one million shekels ($276,000) worth of Champagne, cigars, flights, and hotel rooms from an Israeli movie producer and an Australian casino mogul, according to The Times of Israel.
  • "Case 2,000," which regards allegations that Netanyahu tried to broker a deal with Arnon Mozes, the publisher of the Yedioth Ahronoth newspaper, in which the newspaper covered Netanyahu favorably, and the government would limit its rival's circulation in exchange.
  • "Case 4,000," in which authorities allege that Netanyahu granted regulatory benefits to Bezeq, a telecommunications company, in exchange for positive coverage of Netanyahu by Bezeq's subsidiary news site Walla. 

This article will continue to be updated. 

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