Bernie Sanders rails against McConnell's assertion that $2000 checks are 'socialism for rich people'

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Kathryn Krawczyk
·2 min read
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After Congress agreed to send $600 stimulus checks to Americans, President Trump decided he wanted to push for $2,000 checks instead, launching Trump and some Republicans into an unlikely alliance with Democrats. But the proposal likely won't even get to the Senate floor thanks to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who spent Thursday once again railing against the proposal with a pointed hit at Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).

In his Thursday floor speech, McConnell declared Democrats took Trump's proposal and "skewed it so the checks would benefit even more high-earning households," calling the whole thing "socialism for rich people." McConnell has refused to put the $2,000 checks up for a vote, lumping them in with a repeal of protections for social media companies and other unrelated legislation despite bipartisan criticism.

Sanders meanwhile took a more direct approach, capping off a week of fiery floor speeches with a harsh response to McConnell on Thursday. "The majority leader helped lead this body to pass Trump's tax bill. You want to talk about socialism for the rich, Mr. Majority Leader?" Sanders exclaimed. He likewise criticized McConnell's focus on Section 230, sarcastically calling it something "that is absolutely on the minds" of struggling Americans.

Sanders previously tried to filibuster a vote to override President Trump's veto of the annual National Defense Authorization Act, trying to hold it up until McConnell brought up a standalone vote on the $2,000 checks. But most Republicans and even more Democrats voted to proceed with the vote anyway on Wednesday, stripping Sanders of some of his leverage.

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