Best Mattresses of 2019

Haniya Rae

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Buying a new mattress can be a headache because it’s difficult to separate the marketing hype from a mattress’s attributes. “There are so many mattresses out there that claim a layer of this and a layer of that, so you might think you’re getting a superior product,” says Christopher Regan, who oversees CR’s mattress tests. “Our testing separates the good mattresses from the subpar.” 

To make those distinctions, Consumer Reports gauges firmness and measures precisely how much support each mattress provides to people of different sizes, whether they sleep on their back or on their side.

How We Test Mattresses

At CR we buy and test queen-size mattresses because that’s the most widely sold size. Using lab equipment and human subjects, we evaluate how well a mattress supports the body for both back and side sleepers, how easily sleepers can shift their weight without disturbing their partner, and how well the mattress keeps its shape over time.

To mimic the typical eight- to 10-year useful life span of a mattress, we conduct a test in which a 308-pound roller is pushed over each model 30,000 times.
 

For firmness, rather than take a manufacturer’s word for it, we measure firmness precisely for each mattress we test. Using an objective industry test standard, we apply a load of up to 1,000 newtons (4.4 newtons equal a pound) to the mattress and then plot the results on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the firmest.

We test mattresses from well-known brands, such as Sealy, Serta, Stearns & Foster, and Tempur-Pedic, and from relatively new players, such as Avocado, Casper, Leesa, Reverie, Tuft & Needle, and more. For our latest tests, we brought in mattresses from BedGear, Bob-O-Pedic, Brooklyn Bedding, Dreamcloud, Helix, Mainstays, Rivet, and Shifman. 

Below, CR members can read ratings and reviews of top picks from each of the three types of mattresses we test: adjustable air, innerspring, and foam. 

Best Innerspring Mattresses

These traditional mattresses are composed of steel coils in various configurations. The most widely sold, they also tend to be the least expensive.

Best Innerspring Mattresses

These traditional mattresses are composed of steel coils in various configurations. The most widely sold, they also tend to be the least expensive. 

Best Innerspring Mattresses

These traditional mattresses are composed of steel coils in various configurations. The most widely sold, they also tend to be the least expensive. 

Best Innerspring Mattresses

These traditional mattresses are composed of steel coils in various configurations. The most widely sold, they also tend to be the least expensive. 

Best Innerspring Mattresses

These traditional mattresses are composed of steel coils in various configurations. The most widely sold, they also tend to be the least expensive.

Best Innerspring Mattresses

These traditional mattresses are composed of steel coils in various configurations. The most widely sold, they also tend to be the least expensive.

 

Best Innerspring Mattresses

These traditional mattresses are composed of steel coils in various configurations. The most widely sold, they also tend to be the least expensive.

Tips for Buying a Mattress

Tossing and turning all night? Maybe it’s time for a new mattress. On the “Consumer 101” TV show, CR expert Chris Regan shares tips on what to look for when mattress shopping.



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