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Biden Administration Buys 500 Million Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Doses For Global Use

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President Biden is expected to announce the purchase Thursday in his remarks before the Group of Seven summit in Britain.

Video Transcript

JUAN FERNANDEZ: Tonight, President Biden is overseas, his first trip as President. The White House says he's on a mission to repair relationships with allies and deliver a warning to adversaries.

SERENE BRANSON: And in a bit of vaccine diplomacy, sources tell CBS News Mr. Biden will announce tomorrow the US is donating 500 million doses of Pfizer's shot to 92 countries. KCAL9 political reporter Tom Wait is here with all the latest on this visit. Tom.

TOM WAIT: Yeah, a big visit. And as you said, these vaccines, a big donation here with a lot of the world struggling, obviously, with COVID right now. President Biden could not be more different, obviously, than his predecessor, former President Trump, especially in terms of his dealings with allies. Mr. Biden has made clear he wants to repair damaged relationships among leaders in Western Europe.

[CHEERING]

President Biden and the First Lady get a hero's welcome in the UK. The first stop, a visit to US troops at RAF Mildenhall.

JOE BIDEN: The United States is back.

TOM WAIT: The President trying to reset diplomatic relations with allies after a turbulent four years under President Trump.

JOE BIDEN: This is my first overseas trip as President of the United States. I'm heading to the G7, then to the NATO Ministerial, and then to meet with Mr. Putin to let him know what I want him to know.

[CHEERING]

TOM WAIT: President Biden arrived overseas, bearing gifts-- 200 million Pfizer doses this year, 300 million doses the first half of next year, donated to 92 lower income nations. The eight-day diplomatic swing kicks into high gear on Thursday. He'll sit down with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and hold several days of meetings with G7 heads of state before paying his respects to Queen Elizabeth at Windsor Castle. He then heads to a NATO Security Summit in Brussels, Belgium, and then caps it all off with a high-stakes summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

JOE BIDEN: The United States will respond in a robust and meaningful way when the Russian Government engages in harmful activities.

TOM WAIT: Biden's first trip abroad presents many opportunities to set a different tone. Professor of politics at Claremont McKenna College, Jack Pitney.

JACK PITNEY: One thing he needs to accomplish is not to be Donald Trump. That's a pretty low bar for him to cross, and it's very likely he's going to be judged as an excess by the Europeans.

TOM WAIT: President Biden made clear he intends to strengthen old alliances and take a stronger stand against traditional adversaries.

DONALD TRUMP: I think Russia should be a part of it.

TOM WAIT: Under former President Donald Trump, relations with America's strongest allies frayed.

JACK PITNEY: Among other things, Trump was extremely critical of NATO. He described it as if it were some big homeowners' association where individual countries had their dues that they threw into an individual pot. Just isn't how NATO works.

TOM WAIT: Since taking office, Biden has been forced to confront Russia's cyber hacking operation which has attacked US companies, including the Colonial Pipeline and meat supplier JBS. The White House says those issues will be front and center when the two leaders come face to face next week.

JACK PITNEY: Very different from Trump's meeting with Putin in Helsinki, where he basically agreed with Putin about election interference over the US Intelligence Community. You're not going to see anything like that from Joe Biden. He's going to make the case that the Russians have tried to interfere in US elections. It's going to make a case about Russian aggression and human rights abuses.

TOM WAIT: And there was this. The President getting his own cicada visit. You can see him swatting one away there. You may have heard by now that the East Coast is in the throes of a cicada invasion. They've been popping up just about everywhere. Kind of gross insects there.

And as you saw, First Lady Jill Biden is with the President now, and will be for the first part of his trip. She will return to the US following the meeting with the Queen Serene, back to you.

SERENE BRANSON: All right, Tom. Thank you.