Biden is on course to allow fewer refugees into the US than Trump, according to a report

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Thomas Colson
·2 min read
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Biden
President Joe Biden has framed his infrastructure plan as a means of strengthening democracy and undermining autocracy. Alex Wong/Getty Images
  • President Joe Biden is on track to admit the lowest number of refugees of any president - a historic low.

  • The International Rescue Committee said the number was due to Trump-era policies.

  • Biden said he would raise the cap on the number of permitted refugees to as many as 125,000 from October this year.

  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

President Biden is on track to admit the lowest number of refugees of any president, according to new researchh, which said that the White House had yet to reverse refugee policies introduced during President Trump's time in office.

A report published by the International Rescue Committee found that through the 2021 fiscal year, which began in October 2020, the United States had admitted 2,050 refugees.

If the Biden administration continued admitting refugees at the same rate, that would mean 5,000 refugees were admitted this year.

That would be less than half the number admitted under the Trump administration last year, and would amount to the lowest number of any US president in history, the International Rescue Committee said.

Biden in February declared his intent to restore "moral leadership" to the United States and said he would raise the cap on the number of permitted refugees to as many as 125,000 for the fiscal year that begins in October.

Officials also said that the administration would work with Congress to override this year's cap at 15,000, Insider's Charles Davis reported.

Reaching even that 15,000 target would be difficult, however, partly because the Trump administration also closed over a third of resettlement offices and fired their staff, the Associated Press reported.

Those offices will need to be reopened and new staff will need to be hired before numbers increase significantly.

"Each day that the Trump administration's restrictive and discriminatory categories and all-time low refugee admissions ceiling of 15,000 individuals remains in place is another day that families remain separated and the most vulnerable people are stuck in uncertainty," said Nazanin Ash, vice president of policy and advocacy at the International Rescue Committee in a press release published Monday.

Biden acknowledged the scale of the problem he faced in rebuilding the US in a speech in February. He said: "It's going to take time to rebuild what has been so badly damaged, but that's precisely what we're going to do."

"I'm directing the State Department to consult with Congress about making a down payment on that commitment as soon as possible."

Read the original article on Business Insider