Biden: Trump's view of suburbs is 'not who we are'

By Stephanie Murray
·2 min read

Donald Trump "wouldn't know a suburb unless he took a wrong turn," Democratic nominee Joe Biden said during a television interview, slamming the president's view of the suburbs as outdated and "not who we are."

Biden made the comments during an interview on "60 Minutes," which aired on Sunday. Trump also sat for an interview with the news show, but left abruptly before his portion was finished; as a preemptive strike, the White House released Trump's interview with Lesley Stahl days before it aired on CBS.

"He wouldn't know a suburb unless he took a wrong turn. Go out in the suburbs now. It's not 1950," Biden told Norah O’Donnell. "There's a lot of reasons people are upset. A lot of good reasons. All he wants to do is take that sort of subliminal fear out there and say, 'It's because — because of that guy, or because of that woman.' That's not who we are as a country."

In the final days of the presidential race, many of the suburban white women who supported Trump in key battleground states in 2016 say they prefer Biden this year, according to recent polls.

Trump has made an appeal to suburban voters in the final weeks of the 2020 race, asking, “Suburban women, will you please like me?” Trump said during his "60 Minutes" interview that he was joking when he said the line at a Pittsburgh rally, but then made another appeal to the suburbs.

"I got rid of a regulation," Trump said. "That would bring low-income housing into suburbia that is destroying — that would destroy suburbia."

Trump's view of the suburbs is harmful to democracy, Biden said.

"We've always gone further and further and further toward inclusion. This is the first president who's trying to shut it down. We cannot sustain this democracy that way. We're so much better than this," Biden said.

Vice President Mike Pence and vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris were also interviewed.

Harris echoed Biden's message during her interview. The president has called Harris "nasty" on the campaign trail, among other names.

Asked whether she believes Trump is racist, Harris said "Yes, I do" and pointed to Trump's role in questioning where President Barack Obama was born.

"You can look at a pattern that goes back to him questioning the identity of the first Black president of the United States. You can look at Charlottesville, when there were peaceful protesters, and on the other side, neo-Nazis, and he talks about fine people on either side. Calling Mexicans rapists and criminals. His first order of business was to institute a Muslim ban. It all speaks for itself," Harris said.