Biden's search for a running mate is underway

Joe Biden's search for a running mate is well underway. He has said he will choose a woman, and sources tell CBS News he's seriously considering five to eight potential picks. CBSN political reporter Caitlin Huey-Burns and Washington Post national politics reporter Sean Sullivan joined CBSN's Elaine Quijano to discuss the veepstakes in the age of coronavirus.

  • Iowa congressman Steve King loses Republican primary
    Yahoo News

    Iowa congressman Steve King loses Republican primary

    Rep. Steve King of Iowa, whose history of racist statements resulted in years of criticism and eventually discipline from Republican leadership, lost his primary Tuesday night. The winner of the five-way race was Randy Feenstra, a state senator who outraised King by several hundred thousand dollars and had won endorsements from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Right to Life Committee. Last year King was condemned or outright abandoned by a number of Republican allies who stood by him through his long history of racist rhetoric when he asked, speaking to the New York Times, “White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?” Previously, King had attempted to defend his association with international far-right groups by saying, “If they were in America pushing the platform that they push, they would be Republicans.”

  • Trump tells NYC to activate National Guard: 'The lowlifes and losers are ripping you apart!'
    Yahoo News

    Trump tells NYC to activate National Guard: 'The lowlifes and losers are ripping you apart!'

    After vowing Monday to deploy military force to restore order in states that fail to “dominate” unlawful demonstrations, President Trump on Tuesday all but ordered New York City to request help from the National Guard. “NYC, CALL UP THE NATIONAL GUARD,” Trump tweeted. Parts of New York City, including midtown Manhattan, were rocked by disorder Monday night, despite an 11 p.m. curfew.

  • Vegas officer on life support after attack during protests
    Associated Press

    Vegas officer on life support after attack during protests

    A police officer was on life support Tuesday after being shot during a protest on the Las Vegas Strip, the latest in a handful of attacks on police amid demonstrations across the country over the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The 29-year-old officer in Las Vegas was shot as police tried to disperse a large crowd of protesters in front of a casino shuttered because of the coronavirus. At about the same time and less than three miles (4.8 kilometers) away, police outside a federal courthouse shot a protester who was wearing a black tactical vest and armed with two handguns and a rifle.

  • ‘Wanton thuggery’: Australian reporter knocked down by police live on air as she covered George Floyd protests in DC
    The Independent

    ‘Wanton thuggery’: Australian reporter knocked down by police live on air as she covered George Floyd protests in DC

    US riot police were broadcast live on air using aggressive force to push and knock down an Australian reporter and her cameraman as they covered the Black Lives Matter protests in Washington DC, prompting an investigation by the Australian embassy. Amelia Brace, a reporter for Australian television network Channel 7, was broadcasting from the White House with cameraman Timothy Myers when police plouged into the crowd with riot shields, firing rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse them. Footage of the police barrelling at the camera and shoving the news team was viewed over a million times in a matter of hours.

  • 'My face exploded': Police firing rubber bullets have wounded and permanently disabled protesters and journalists
    INSIDER

    'My face exploded': Police firing rubber bullets have wounded and permanently disabled protesters and journalists

    Social media is filled with images of wounded protesters and journalists who have been struck by rubber bullets and tear gas canisters in the eyes and face. Some have even lost their sight. Experts policing, however, tell Insider that rubber bullets are considered "less lethal" weapons — and many police departments have considered them a "legitimate tool" for decades.

  • The 2020 hurricane season already broke a record, and it's only day 3
    Business Insider

    The 2020 hurricane season already broke a record, and it's only day 3

    NOAA GOES-East Just two days into the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, Tropical Storm Cristobal was churning in the Gulf of Mexico. It was the third Atlantic storm powerful enough to get a name this season; no other year on record has seen three named Atlantic storms so early. On average, the third storm forms around August 13, according to AccuWeather.

  • Putin declines British invitation to take part in coronavirus summit: Kremlin
    Reuters

    Putin declines British invitation to take part in coronavirus summit: Kremlin

    Russian President Vladimir Putin does not plan to take part in an online summit on a possible coronavirus vaccine being organised by the British government this week, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said on Wednesday. Putin received an invitation to take part in the summit from British Prime Minister Boris Johnson last week, the Kremlin had said. Scheduled to take place on June 4, the Global Vaccine Summit 2020 is designed to mobilise resources needed to ensure universal availability of the vaccine against the novel coronavirus.

  • U.K. PM tells China that Britain will admit 3 Million from Hong Kong
    NBC News

    U.K. PM tells China that Britain will admit 3 Million from Hong Kong

    The United Kingdom will not walk away from the people of Hong Kong if China imposes a national security law which conflicts with Beijing's international obligations under a 1984 accord, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Wednesday. "Hong Kong succeeds because its people are free," Johnson wrote in The Times of London. "If China proceeds, this would be in direct conflict with its obligations under the joint declaration, a legally binding treaty registered with the United Nations."

  • Bar owner won't face charges in fatal shooting of Omaha protester
    CBS News

    Bar owner won't face charges in fatal shooting of Omaha protester

    During protests in Omaha, Nebraska over the weekend, a black activist was shot and killed by a white bar owner after a fight broke out. The county attorney said the shooter will not face charges because he was "defending himself." James Scurlock, 22, was killed by Jacob Gardner, the owner of the Hive Bar and Gatsby Bar in Omaha's Old Market neighborhood around midnight Saturday in the midst of protests against police brutality and George Floyd's death.

  • Powerful video from 1986 resurfaces showing Biden’s passionate speech against apartheid
    The Independent

    Powerful video from 1986 resurfaces showing Biden’s passionate speech against apartheid

    A powerful video of then-Senator Joe Biden speaking about apartheid South Africa has resurfaced. The clip, taken from C-Span coverage of a Senate committee in 1986, shows Mr Biden passionately speaking out in support of the majority black population of South Africa, and against the oppressive apartheid regime. Challenging Reagan administration secretary of state George Schultz on government policy towards South Africa, Senator Biden says he is disturbed by the rationale behind it, arguing that it amounts to doing nothing.

  • Gov. Cuomo apologizes to NYPD brass after critical 'do your job' comments, chief says
    USA TODAY

    Gov. Cuomo apologizes to NYPD brass after critical 'do your job' comments, chief says

    ALBANY, N.Y. – New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo apologized privately to top New York City Police administrators Tuesday after earlier in the day ripping their response to rioters as a "disgrace." NYPD Chief Terence Monahan told NBC's "Today" show Wednesday that Cuomo's office called him, and the governor called commissioner Dermot Shea to apologize and clarify his remarks. Last night, his office called and apologized to me, and I know he called the commissioner directly to apologize,” Monahan said.

  • Autopsy report shows Floyd had tested positive for COVID-19
    Associated Press

    Autopsy report shows Floyd had tested positive for COVID-19

    A full autopsy of George Floyd, the handcuffed black man who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police, was released Wednesday and provides several clinical details, including that Floyd had previously tested positive for COVID-19. Bystander video showing Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin pressing his knee on Floyd's neck, ignoring Floyd's “I can't breathe” cries until he eventually stopped moving, has sparked nationwide protests, some violent. The report by Chief Medical Examiner Andrew Baker spelled out clinical details, including that Floyd had tested positive for COVID-19 on April 3 but appeared asymptomatic.

  • Missing Mexican congresswoman's body found a month after abduction
    The Guardian

    Missing Mexican congresswoman's body found a month after abduction

    The body of a missing Mexican congresswoman has been found in a shallow grave more than a month after she was abducted by armed men while raising awareness about the coronavirus pandemic. Anel Bueno, a 38-year-old lawmaker from the western state of Colima, was snatched on 29 April in Ixtlahuacán, a town on a stretch of Mexico's Pacific coast that the drug trade has made one of the country's most murderous regions. Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador told reporters on Wednesday a suspect had been detained over the killing of Bueno, who was a member of his party, Morena.

  • D.C. police officer to protesters: 'If I didn't think change was possible, I would just give up'
    Yahoo News Video

    D.C. police officer to protesters: 'If I didn't think change was possible, I would just give up'

    Hours into the mandatory curfew in Washington, D.C., several police officers were recorded engaging in peaceful dialogue with protesters. While remaining in opposition to the extended protests over George Floyd's death, one officer appeared to commiserate with protesters' desire to seek change.

  • The Trump administration was just hit with the first lawsuit challenging its executive order targeting social-media companies
    Business Insider

    The Trump administration was just hit with the first lawsuit challenging its executive order targeting social-media companies

    REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst A technology advocacy group filed the first lawsuit challenging President Trump's recent executive order targeting social-media companies. The lawsuit on Tuesday, filed by the Center for Democracy in Technology, argues that the order violates the First Amendment. Trump issued the executive order, which seeks to change a law protecting social-media companies, after Twitter flagged his tweets with a fact-check label.

  • Voices captured on an NYC police scanner can be heard saying protesters should be shot and run over
    INSIDER

    Voices captured on an NYC police scanner can be heard saying protesters should be shot and run over

    REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz A New York police scanner broadcast voices advocating violence against protesters. Audio clips of the communication have circulated on social media. In one clip, someone says: "Shoot those motherf---ers," referring to the protesters.

  • Germany wants to swap EU travel warning for softer guidelines this week
    Reuters

    Germany wants to swap EU travel warning for softer guidelines this week

    Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said that the German cabinet would on Wednesday discuss a resolution on downgrading the travel warnings currently in force for European Union countries and several other associated countries into softer guidelines. "We are preparing a resolution for the cabinet tomorrow, which is still being agreed within the government," Maas told reporters at a news conference with his Ukrainian counterpart on Tuesday. "This week we want to start by turning the travel warning we have for the European Union and the associated countries into travel guidelines," he added.

  • Iranian scientist freed from US custody returns to Iran
    AFP

    Iranian scientist freed from US custody returns to Iran

    Iranian scientist Cyrus Asgari returned to Iran Wednesday after being released by the United States, the Islamic Republic's arch enemy, where he had spent nearly three years in detention after being charged with espionage. Asgari, 59, who has been cleared by US judicial authorities, fell into the arms of his relatives on his arrival at Tehran's international airport, images broadcast by several Iranian media showed. He was wearing a face mask but appeared to be in good health despite having caught the coronavirus while in US custody according to the Iranian foreign ministry.

  • Fox’s Brit Hume Grumbles That Biden Is Spouting ‘Black Grievance Politics’
    The Daily Beast

    Fox’s Brit Hume Grumbles That Biden Is Spouting ‘Black Grievance Politics’

    Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume complained about presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's speech on racial injustice, grousing on Tuesday that the former vice president was just peddling “black grievance politics.” Speaking at Philadelphia's City Hall on Tuesday amid the fiery protests that have raged for days in the wake of George Floyd's death, Biden called on Congress to pass legislation to ban chokeholds and create a standard use-of-force “model” for police across the nation. Following Fox News host Tucker Carlson's program-opening monologue in which he warned viewers that “violent young men with guns” will soon be coming to their neighborhoods, Hume was asked how the political landscape would look in the aftermath of the protests.

  • Tropical Storm Cristobal has formed in Gulf of Mexico and may approach US by weekend
    USA TODAY

    Tropical Storm Cristobal has formed in Gulf of Mexico and may approach US by weekend

    Tropical Storm Cristobal, already the third storm of this year's hurricane season, formed Tuesday afternoon off the coast of Mexico and could reach Texas, Louisiana or the Florida Panhandle by Friday or early next week, meteorologists say. The storm began as a tropical depression with heavy rainfall and flooding over Mexico and Central America. The National Hurricane Center issued a public advisory soon after the storm moved through the Gulf, 150 miles from Campeche, Mexico, warning that increased rainfall, flooding and potential mudslides can be expected in southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

  • America is at its breaking point and white women still won't stop frivolously calling police on black people
    Los Angeles Times Opinion

    America is at its breaking point and white women still won't stop frivolously calling police on black people

    Americans of all stripes are taking to the streets to protest the unjust killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police — and the larger issues of police brutality and institutional racism in our society. The vast majority of Americans support these protests. But even if you're white and among the paltry 14% of people who strongly disagree with the protests, one might think the recent international humiliation of Amy Cooper for her racist behavior would be enough to at least provoke some circumspection.

  • Police killing of 'BBQ Man' renews anguish in Louisville
    NBC News

    Police killing of 'BBQ Man' renews anguish in Louisville

    Louisville, Kentucky, a city already grappling with the police shooting death of Breonna Taylor nearly three months ago, faced renewed anguish this week with another police shooting that killed beloved business owner David McAtee. McAtee was in a parking lot next to his barbecue stand, YaYa's Barbecue, early Monday when Louisville police officers and the National Guard went to break up a crowd in violation of a recently mandated curfew. The crowd that the police and National Guard was trying to disperse wasn't part of protests, according to NBC Louisville affiliate WAVE, and people often congregate in the parking lot of McAtee's restaurant to eat and play music.

  • Associated Press

    Mexico finds links to over $1 billlion in cartel money

    Mexican financial regulators said Tuesday they have frozen the bank accounts of 1,939 people and companies believed to be linked to movements of about $1.1 billion in Jalisco drug cartel money. The country's anti-money laundering agency said it worked with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to identify the 1,770 people and 167 companies caught up in the financial dragnet, dubbed "Operation Blue Agave." Blue agave is the cactus-like plant used to make tequila, which is the signature drink of Jalisco, the cartel's home state.

  • China hid crucial information about the coronavirus early on. Here's what was really happening while Chinese authorities stayed silent.
    Business Insider

    China hid crucial information about the coronavirus early on. Here's what was really happening while Chinese authorities stayed silent.

    China delayed the release of critical information about its coronavirus outbreak, a new AP investigation revealed. Chinese authorities took several days to alert the World Health Organization about an initial cluster of cases and waited more than a week before releasing the virus' genome to the public. When China reported the emergency of a new coronavirus to the World Health Organization on January 3, it at first seemed to be rectifying mistakes made during the SARS outbreak in 2003.

  • George Floyd protests: All four former police officers face new charges as demonstrations continue nationwide
    The Independent

    George Floyd protests: All four former police officers face new charges as demonstrations continue nationwide

    Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison has announced new charges against all four former officers involved in the death of George Floyd. The attorney general announced charges against Thomas Lane, Tou Thao and J Alexander Kueng, the three officers seen alongside Derek Chauvin, an officer who kneeled on Mr Floyd's neck for over eight minutes before his death, according to charging documents. Active-duty troops were meanwhile sent home from the nation's capitol on Wednesday after Defence Secretary Mark Esper said the Insurrection Act should be used "only in the most urgent and dire of situations".