Big-nosed, horned-faced dinosaur unearthed in Utah

1 / 7
A reconstruction of a "Nasutoceratops titusi" is shown during a news conference at the Natural History Museum of Utah Wednesday, July 17, 2013, in Salt lake City. Researchers in Salt Lake City say fossil-hunters unearthed the bones of a new type of big-nosed, horned-faced dinosaur in southern Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Researchers in Utah said Wednesday they discovered a new type of big-nosed, horned-faced dinosaur that lived about 76 million years ago in the area of what is now the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

The discovery of the creature, named "Nasutoceratops titusi," was described in the British scientific journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B and by officials at the National History Museum of Utah in Salt Lake City.

The dinosaur was a wide-bodied plant-eater that grew to 15 feet long and weighed 2 1/2 tons, said Patti Carpenter, spokeswoman for the museum. It is considered unique for its oversized nose and its exceptionally long, curved and forward-pointing horns over the eyes. It also had a low, narrow blade-like horn above the nose.

Research headed by Scott Sampson, former chief curator at the museum, determined that Nasutoceratops lived in a swampy and subtropical environment about 62 miles from the water.

It was part of the same family as the well-known Triceratops, from which it derives part of its name. The second part of the name recognizes paleontologist Alan Titus for his years of research work in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.

The bones were discovered in 2006 by a University of Utah masters student, Eric Lund. Specimens are permanently housed and displayed at the museum at the University of Utah. Lund, who is now at Ohio University, is a co-author of the study with researchers Mark Loewen, Andrew Farke and Katherine Clayton.

Sampson is now vice president of research and collections at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. He said researchers don't believe the large nose of the Nasutoceratops had anything to do with smell, since olfactory receptors were far back in the head.

Horned dinosaurs or "ceratopsids," were four-footed herbivores that lived during the late Cretaceous period, when the North American continent was split in two by waters of a warm shallow sea.

Researchers call the western portion of the continent Laramidia. It now yields dinosaur digs and research sites from Alaska to Mexico.

Research was funded by the federal Bureau of Land Management, the National Science Foundation and the museums in Salt Lake City and Denver.

  • Ocasio-Cortez's progressive PAC makes first round of endorsements
    Yahoo News

    Ocasio-Cortez's progressive PAC makes first round of endorsements

    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced Friday her political action committee's first round of endorsements, which will include two progressive candidates challenging sitting Democratic members of Congress. “It's time to elect a progressive majority in Congress accountable to strong, grassroots movements that push support for issues like Medicare for All, a Green New Deal, racial justice and more,” said Ocasio-Cortez Friday, announcing the support of seven women via her Courage to Change PAC. When the freshman lawmaker from New York announced in January she was starting her own PAC dedicated to electing progressive legislators, she said it would refuse to pay dues to the House's campaign arm, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC).

  • U.S. vs. Huawei: Is future of the internet at stake?
    Yahoo News 360

    U.S. vs. Huawei: Is future of the internet at stake?

    Last week, the U.S. government charged the Chinese company Huawei with running a campaign to steal trade secrets from American businesses over the course of two decades. It was the latest move in the Trump administration's effort to constrain the tech giant, which it considers to be a threat to national security. Huawei is one of the world's largest telecommunications companies.

  • With information from China scarce, U.S. spies enlisted to track coronavirus
    Yahoo News

    With information from China scarce, U.S. spies enlisted to track coronavirus

    As Chinese officials face allegations of locking down information about the spread of the coronavirus, U.S. intelligence agencies have been helping in governmentwide efforts to gather information about the disease's global spread. Already, some of the best information about the coronavirus and the Chinese government's response to it is coming from military channels, according to two sources familiar with the matter. “China's behavior causes the intelligence community to get involved,” said one of those sources, a former intelligence official.

  • Girl, 11, gave birth to baby allegedly fathered by brother
    NBC News

    Girl, 11, gave birth to baby allegedly fathered by brother

    An 11-year-old girl who was allegedly raped by her brother gave birth at home, and now he and their parents are facing criminal charges. The girl gave birth to a boy in a bathtub in St. Charles, Missouri, according to a probable cause statement. Her biological brother, who is 17, was charged last week with incest, statutory rape and statutory sodomy of a person younger than 12, while her parents were charged with child endangerment.

  • I Live in South Korea Where Coronavirus Cases are Rising. Not Much Has Changed
    The National Interest

    I Live in South Korea Where Coronavirus Cases are Rising. Not Much Has Changed

    South Korea now has the second-highest number of cases of the coronavirus in the world. First, it is worth noting, per Andray Abrahamian, that because South Korea is an open society with an excellent medical system, you are hearing a lot more about corona here than in closed countries. It goes without saying that should corona strike North Korea, that repressive government will tell us nothing and treat the victims terribly.

  • Mike Bloomberg's social media strategy is under fire as Twitter suspends 70 pro-Bloomberg accounts for platform manipulation
    Business Insider

    Mike Bloomberg's social media strategy is under fire as Twitter suspends 70 pro-Bloomberg accounts for platform manipulation

    Carlo Allegri/Reuters Democratic presidential candidate and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is once again in hot water over his campaign's social media strategy. On Friday, the Los Angeles Times reported that Twitter was suspending 70 accounts for tweeting identical messages of support for Bloomberg for violating its rules against platform manipulation. Some accounts were permanently suspended, while others will need to be verified in order to regain posting abilities, a Twitter spokesman told Business Insider.

  • US accuses Russia of huge coronavirus disinformation campaign
    The Independent

    US accuses Russia of huge coronavirus disinformation campaign

    US officials say thousands of social media accounts linked to Russia are part of a coordinated effort to spread disinformation about the new coronavirus. The campaign allegedly aims to damage the US's image and spread unfounded conspiracy theories that it is behind the outbreak which has infected nearly 78,000 globally and killed over 2,500 people. US State Department officials told AFP fake accounts were created and used on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram so the campaign could reach as many people as possible in multiple languages.

  • CDC is preparing for the 'likely' spread of coronavirus in the US, officials say
    USA TODAY

    CDC is preparing for the 'likely' spread of coronavirus in the US, officials say

    Health experts sounded the alarm Friday over the worldwide threat of the coronavirus, with officials warning of its "likely" community spread in the United States and the World Health Organization cautioning that "the window of opportunity is narrowing" for containing the outbreak worldwide. The COVID-19 coronavirus, which erupted in China in December, has killed at least 2,360 people and sickened at least 77,900 worldwide, the majority of cases in mainland China. Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told reporters Friday that U.S. health officials are preparing for the coronavirus to become a pandemic.

  • Iran shuts schools, cultural centres as coronavirus kills five
    AFP

    Iran shuts schools, cultural centres as coronavirus kills five

    Iran on Saturday ordered the closure of schools, universities and cultural centres after a coronavirus outbreak that has killed five people in the Islamic republic -- the most outside the Far East. The moves came as Iranian authorities reported one more death among 10 new cases of the virus. Since it emerged in December, the new coronavirus has killed 2,345 people in China, the epicentre of the epidemic, and 17 elsewhere in the world.

  • Nevada caucuses live updates: Bernie Sanders wins Nevada Democratic caucuses
    NBC News

    Nevada caucuses live updates: Bernie Sanders wins Nevada Democratic caucuses

    Bernie Sanders was the winner of Saturday's Nevada caucuses, according to an NBC News projection. Saturday's caucuses followed a fiery debate among the candidates earlier in the week in which Sanders, Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren challenged former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg on sexism and race and Amy Klobuchar sparred with Pete Buttigieg over their political experience. Nevada is the first Western state in the Democratic presidential primary following New Hampshire and the chaos that was the Iowa caucuses.

  • California Gov Newsom Advocates for Doctors to ‘Write Prescriptions for Housing’ to Treat Mental Illness
    National Review

    California Gov Newsom Advocates for Doctors to ‘Write Prescriptions for Housing’ to Treat Mental Illness

    California Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday wrote that doctors should be able to prescribe housing like they are able to prescribe medication. “Doctors should be able to write prescriptions for housing the same way they do for insulin or antibiotics,” Newsom wrote in a Twitter post. Newsom then appeared to link the treatment of mental health to his state's housing shortage.

  • 10 Amazing Facts About Polar Bears
    Popular Mechanics

    10 Amazing Facts About Polar Bears

    A few things you might not have known about the largest bear in the world. From Popular Mechanics

  • Bloomberg

    Historic Assange Trial to Hinge on Trump’s Political Motivations

    On Monday, a four-week trial in London will begin to determine whether he can be shipped to the U.S., where he faces a maximum prison term of 175 years for releasing classified government documents. The case will start days after Assange's attorneys alleged that President Donald Trump instructed a former congressman to offer their client a pardon if he “played ball” and said Russia had nothing to do with Democratic National Committee leaks during the 2016 election. The site was also caught up in a U.S. investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election, after publishing stolen emails that helped undercut Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign.

  • Here Comes 1984: China's Regime Is An Existential Threat to the World
    The National Interest

    Here Comes 1984: China's Regime Is An Existential Threat to the World

    The Chinese communist government increasingly poses an existential threat not just to its own 1.4 billion citizens but to the world at large. China is currently in a dangerously chaotic state. And why not, when a premodern authoritarian society leaps wildly into the brave new world of high-tech science in a single generation? Predictably, the Chinese Communist Party has not developed the social, political, or cultural infrastructure to ensure that its sophisticated industrial and biological research does not go rogue and become destructive to itself and to the billions of people who are on the importing end of Chinese products and protocols.

  • South Korea accepted that its efforts to stop the coronavirus from infecting the country failed and says it's pivoting to containment
    Business Insider

    South Korea accepted that its efforts to stop the coronavirus from infecting the country failed and says it's pivoting to containment

    Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images With coronavirus cases soaring, the government in South Korea said on Friday that it had failed to keep the virus out of the country and must now focus on containment. South Korea is now the country with the most coronavirus infections outside China, with a total of 433 confirmed cases. The government has urged the 2.5 million people in Daegu to stay in their homes and has banned some public gatherings.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s progressive PAC makes first round of endorsements
    Yahoo News Video

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s progressive PAC makes first round of endorsements

    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced Friday her political action committee's first round of endorsements, which will include two progressive candidates challenging sitting Democratic members of Congress.

  • Students' arrest over slur prompts review of ridicule law
    Associated Press

    Students' arrest over slur prompts review of ridicule law

    Free speech concerns that were raised following the arrests of two University of Connecticut students accused of saying a racial slur have led state legislators to consider repealing a century-old law that bans ridicule based on race, religion or nationality. The episode on campus involving two white students in October was recorded on video and sparked protests against racism. Many people applauded their arrests, but civil liberties groups condemned them as an affront to First Amendment rights.

  • AOC launches plan to block non-progressive Democrats with all-female candidates: 'My ambition right now is to be a little less lonely in Congress'
    The Independent

    AOC launches plan to block non-progressive Democrats with all-female candidates: 'My ambition right now is to be a little less lonely in Congress'

    Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is planning to endorse an all-female group of progressive candidates to build the far left, with some of the challengers going against members already in the Democratic Party. Her endorsements of more than one dozen candidates from her new political action committee will include a progressive challenger to potentially unseat a Texas representative from her party. "I think my ambition right now is to be a little less lonely in Congress," she told the New York Times.

  • Vietnamese dissident monk who was a Nobel Prize nominee dies at 93
    AFP

    Vietnamese dissident monk who was a Nobel Prize nominee dies at 93

    Thich Quang Do, a dissident Buddhist monk who has effectively been under house arrest since 2003 and was nominated multiple times for the Nobel Peace Prize, has died aged 93. Head of the banned Unified Buddist Church of Vietnam (UBCV), the vocal patriarch was born on November 27, 1928 in northern Thai Binh province and spent most of his life advocating for religious freedom and human rights in communist-run Vietnam. His staunch activism landed him under what was effectively house arrest in Ho Chi Minh City in 2003, where he was under constant surveillance.

  • Reuters

    Family furore over Singapore founder's will deepens after tribunal ruling

    The daughter-in-law of Singapore's founding father has been found guilty by a disciplinary tribunal of professional misconduct over her involvement in preparing his will, which is at heart of a feud between the city-state's first family. The latest development in a long-running saga could sow further discord among the prime minister and his siblings - whose father Lee Kuan Yew co-founded the party which has ruled the island nation unbroken since independence - just as an election looms. "I disagree with the Disciplinary Tribunal's report and will fight this strongly when it is heard in open court," said Lee Suet Fern, a lawyer who is married to the prime minister's younger brother.

  • Two academics in their 70s who vanished from cottage are found alive
    NBC News

    Two academics in their 70s who vanished from cottage are found alive

    Two academics in their 70s who disappeared from a Northern California rental cottage more than a week ago were found alive Saturday, authorities said. The Marin County Sheriff's Department said Carol Kiparsky, 77, and Ian Irwin, 72, were plucked by a helicopter crew from heavily wooded terrain above Tomales Bay. They were conscious and dehydrated when they were taken to a hospital in unknown condition, authorities said.

  • No Evidence Russia Helping Trump, Top U.S. Security Aide Says
    Bloomberg

    No Evidence Russia Helping Trump, Top U.S. Security Aide Says

    Donald Trump's top security aide said he's seen no evidence that Russia is interfering in the 2020 U.S. election in an effort to support the president's re-election bid. On the other hand, National Security Adviser Robert O'Brien told ABC News that it would be “no surprise” if Moscow was trying to help Senator Bernie Sanders win the election, as reported on Friday. I haven't seen any intelligence that Russia is doing anything to attempt to get President Trump re-elected,” O'Brien said in an interview set for broadcast Sunday on “This Week.

  • Coronavirus: Could It Takedown China's Communist Party?
    The National Interest

    Coronavirus: Could It Takedown China's Communist Party?

    Brand “People's Republic of China” is wobbling, as if the massive picture of Mao Zedong in Tiananmen Square was swaying with an earthquake tremor. But it can only actually fall if pushed from inside. The handling of the coronavirus epidemic is undoubtedly sapping confidence in the Communist party and its formerly all-conquering general secretary, Xi Jinping.

  • More than 100 wild animals in China died from poisoning in a mass die-off seemingly triggered by coronavirus disinfectant
    Business Insider

    More than 100 wild animals in China died from poisoning in a mass die-off seemingly triggered by coronavirus disinfectant

    STR/AFP via Getty Images More than 100 wild animals were found dead in a Chinese megacity and tests show that they were poisoned by the disinfectant that's being used to combat the coronavirus. At least 17 species of animals, including wild boar, weasels, and blackbirds, were affected by the mass die-off. Nanchong Stray Animal Rescue claims that authorities are killing domesticated animals outright amid fears that they can spread the coronavirus.

  • Family of man killed by Connecticut trooper seeks more than $10M in wrongful death damages
    Yahoo News Video

    Family of man killed by Connecticut trooper seeks more than $10M in wrongful death damages

    Relatives of a black Connecticut man killed by a state trooper are seeking more than $10 million in wrongful death damages from state and local police, according to legal notices filed Thursday.