These Are the Biggest 'Guns' To Ever Fire a Shot

War Is Boring
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War Is Boring

Security, Europe

History says so.

These Are the Biggest 'Guns' To Ever Fire a Shot

In 1453, after his artillery corps reduced the thousand-year-old walls of Constantinople to rubble, Sultan Mehmet II claimed the city for the Ottoman Empire. Europe named the metal tubes that fired projectiles “gunnildes,” which became “guns.”

As a quintessential high-end machined product, the large gun reached its pinnacle during the Industrial Age.

(This article by David Axe originally appeared at War is Boring in 2013.)

The Kaiser’s World War I “Paris Gun” captured the imagination with its sheer scale; its quarter-ton rounds pierced the stratosphere when lobbed 75 miles downrange into the Paris arrondissements.

Later during World War II the cities of Sevastopol and Leningrad were subjected to fire by the largest mobile artillery ever built: the “Karl” 23-inch mortar and the “Gustav” 32-inch railway gun.

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