Billie Holiday’s Former Upper West Side Townhouse Is Back on the Market for $14 Million

·2 min read

The New York City townhouse where jazz star Billie Holiday once lived has just hit the market for $13.995 million. Located on the Upper West Side, the property was Holiday’s home until her death in 1959 and where she lived when she released one of her most famous albums, Lady in Satin, in 1958.

Built in early 1900 in a Renaissance Revival architectural style, the townhouse is situated adjacent to Central Park and the Reservoir. With a width of 20 feet, it spans more than 6,300 square feet over six levels and has seven bedrooms, six full bathrooms, and two half baths. Features include an abundance of natural light, spacious rooms with 10- to 12-foot-high ceilings, six fireplaces, a wine cellar, a screening room with a full kitchen and bar, and skylight.

The townhouse is listed with Kelly Killoren Bensimon of Douglas Elliman, who formerly starred on The Real Housewives of New York City and Million Dollar Listing. She says the primary suite, which encompasses the entire third floor and measures 1,100 square feet, is a selling point. “It’s like staying in the best hotel suite you can imagine and six-star living. The bathroom has heated marble floors, and every finish is top of the line.” Also notable is the private picturesque backyard garden. “The garden is a verdant Zen oasis and full of eclectic specimens,” Bensimon tells AD. “It’s a retreat from the craziness of the city.”

The living room.
The living room.
Photo: Evan Joseph Photography

Holiday’s onetime abode was recently fully renovated by architect Amie Sachs, formerly of Selldorf Architects. The historic details such as crown moldings and vaulted ceilings remain intact, but the Internet, plumbing and electrical wiring have been modernized.

The current owners purchased the residence for $9.475M in 2017 and are relocating within Manhattan, according to Killoren Bensimon. “This is the perfect home for families. Once you move in, you never need to leave,” she says.

Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest