Billy Connolly admits he has begun to believe in life after death

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Billy Connolly photographed after an interview with the Press Association at the Westbury Mayfair Hotel, London, United Kingdom. 29th July 2019
Billy Connolly has said he has come to believe in an afterlife. (PA)

Sir Billy Connolly has revealed he has started to believe in life after death.

The 78-year-old retired comedian, actor and musician – who has previously admitted to offending “most religions” in his comedy – confessed he can't accept that death will be the end of him.

Sir Billy told The Observer: "I’m sure there’s something. I’m sure there’s something."

Read more: Sir Billy Connolly 'I'd be cancelled if I started out in comedy today'

Asked why he added: “I don’t know, in recent years, I’ve just got a feeling that there is. That we don’t just turn to s**te. Maybe this is my refusal to accept something so mundane...

Actor and comedian Billy Connolly poses for photographers prior to a press conference for his new film 'The Man who Sued God' at St Mary's Church in Central London. The film premieres at the Warner West End Cinema in London's Leicester Square.
Billy Connolly has made fun of 'most religions' as a comedian. (PA)

"That I’ll be squashed, like any other garden mite, and that’ll be the end. Well that can’t be what happens, can it?”

The Scottish star – who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and prostate cancer in 2013 – said that while he is not scared of death, he does resent the idea of his life coming to an end.

He said: "I do feel that. Cheated, in a way? But it hasn’t happened yet. So how can I have been cheated? And who knows? It might be so lovely on the other side that you don’t ever think about that.”

Billy Connolly with his wife Pamela Stephenson during a reception hosted by Prime Minister Theresa May in 10 Downing Street, London, marking 200 years since Dr James Parkinson's Essay on the Shaking Palsy.
Billy Connolly with his wife Pamela Stephenson. (PA)

Sir Billy – who officially resigned from stand-up comedy in 2016 – revealed in a BBC documentary in 2019 that his struggle with Parkinson’s disease was starting to impact on all aspects of his life as a performer.

The Glasgow-born comic admitted the disease – a neurological condition that affects body movement – made even little things like getting up out of an armchair a challenge.

Billy Connolly with the Special Recognition Award in the press room at the National Television Awards 2016 at the O2 Arena, London.
Billy Connolly retired from stand-up in 2016. (PA)

He said: “What works on a Monday, to get you out of a chair, doesn’t always work by Wednesday. It can be a cruel disease.”

Read more: Sir Billy Connolly set to release first autobiography

But Sir Billy – who lives in Florida with his wife of 22 years Pamela Stephenson – revealed he is still able to enjoy drawing and fishing, adding: “Can you go fishing for ever? Maybe you can.”

Watch: Billy Connolly admits he is losing his battle with Parkinson's disease

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