Binge drinking is on the rise: What to know about the risks

KATIE KINDELAN

Binge drinking is on the rise: What to know about the risks originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com

The number of drinks Americans are consuming per bingeing episode has increased dramatically, according to a new study.

The annual number of binge drinks among adults who reported binge drinking jumped on average from 472 in 2011 to 529 in 2017, a 12% increase, according to the study published Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

(MORE: America is on a binge -- 17.5 billion drinks worth: Study)

Binge drinking is defined by the CDC as a "pattern of drinking that brings a person’s blood alcohol concentration to 0.08 grams percent or above."

That typically means consuming five or more drinks in a two-hour period for men and four or more drinks in a two-hour period for women, according to the CDC.

(MORE: What to know about rising Sober Curious movement)

One in six adults in the U.S. binge drinks about four times a month, consuming about seven drinks per binge, and binge drinking is twice as common among men than among women, according to the CDC.

PHOTO: People raise their glasses in an undated stock photo. (STOCK PHOTO/Getty Images)

In the latest study, the CDC found that increases in binge drinking were most prominent in people 35 or older and those with lower educational levels and household incomes.

Drinking a steady amount of alcohol in a short amount of time has a different impact on your body than drinking, for example, one glass of wine each night over the course of one week, according to Dr. Jennifer Ashton, ABC News chief medical correspondent and a board-certified OBGYN.

"If you look at the effects of alcohol in a short-term, acute period, there can be memory blackouts, there can be accidents – we’re talking about things from falls, burns, motor vehicle accidents, even homicides – increase in risky behavior, like sexual behavior and acute tissue damage, mostly to the liver," she said Friday on "Good Morning America." "This is a significant issue and so our radar is up to take a look at it."

Ashton stressed the importance of "self-awareness" for people who consume alcohol.

For women, a moderate alcohol intake per week is defined as seven servings of alcohol or less. For men, it is 14 servings of alcohol or less per week, according to Ashton.

One serving of alcohol is defined as five ounces for wine and just one-and-a-half ounces for hard alcohol, far less than what is typically served in bars, restaurants and people's homes.

  • Americans stranded at Pakistan airport after cruise ship was denied entry to multiple countries over coronavirus fears
    Yahoo News

    Americans stranded at Pakistan airport after cruise ship was denied entry to multiple countries over coronavirus fears

    A plane full of Americans and Canadians was stranded on a tarmac at an airport in Karachi, Pakistan, for several hours on Thursday after it was turned away from multiple countries due to fears of the coronavirus, according to a family member of two of the passengers. Kelly Chrjapin, whose parents were among those on the flight, said the plane contained more than 250 people, all of whom were American and Canadian nationals who had been traveling on the cruise ship MS Westerdam. One passenger from that boat tested positive for the coronavirus earlier this month.

  • Associated Press

    Judge dismisses Nunes lawsuit against Fusion GPS

    A federal judge on Friday dismissed a racketeering lawsuit brought by Republican Rep. Devin Nunes against the political research firm that enlisted a former British spy to look into Donald Trump's ties to Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign. Nunes, the former chairman of the House Intelligence Committee and a vocal ally of Trump, had accused Fusion GPS in a lawsuit last year of harassing him and trying to impede his panel's investigation into Russian election interference. The lawsuit, which was filed in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia, and also named a nonprofit advocacy group as a defendant, sought nearly $10 million in damages.

  • Reuters

    U.S. charges ex-DEA agent with laundering millions in drug funds

    U.S. authorities arrested a former Drug Enforcement Administration agent on Friday on charges he conspired with Colombian drug traffickers to steal millions of dollars the U.S. government had seized from suspected dealers. In an indictment unsealed Friday, prosecutors said Jose Irizarry had been "enriching himself by secretly using his position and his special access to information." He used the money, they said, to fund a lavish lifestyle of expensive homes and cars and a $30,000 Tiffany ring. Federal prosecutors said Irizarry used his position with the drug agency to launder money with the help of what they described as a "Colombia-based drug trafficking and money laundering organization" that he was ostensibly investigating.

  • Coronavirus updates: Cases in South Korea surge as U.S. prepares for pandemic
    NBC News

    Coronavirus updates: Cases in South Korea surge as U.S. prepares for pandemic

    Cases surge in South Korea after outbreak at church • Coronavirus incubation could be as long as 27 days • Second death emerges in Italy • Tokyo postpones training for Olympics volunteers over virus fears • U.S. takes steps to prepare for pandemic as global COVID—19 cases rise • Federal judge blocks effort to transfer coronavirus patients to California city • China's central bank vows to take more steps to support virus-hit economy China reports fall in new cases, amid concerns over rising global spread China reported a sharp decrease in new deaths and cases of the coronavirus on Saturday, but a surge of infections in South Korea and new cases in Iran added to unease about its rapid global s...

  • Watch Out! U.S. Army Tanks Could Collapse Polish Bridges On Their Way to Battle Russia
    The National Interest

    Watch Out! U.S. Army Tanks Could Collapse Polish Bridges On Their Way to Battle Russia

    The U.S. Army and its closest allies have a problem. To deter Russia from attacking Poland and the Baltic States, the Army and its NATO allies should deploy heavy armored forces such as M-1 tanks, armored fighting vehicles and self-propelled artillery. RAND, a California think-tank with close ties to the U.S. military, in a February 2020 report underscored the importance of heavy ground forces.

  • Quadruple murderer executed in Tennessee
    AFP

    Quadruple murderer executed in Tennessee

    A quadruple murderer was put to death in Tennessee on Thursday despite lawyers asking the US Supreme Court for a stay of execution. Nicholas Sutton, 58, was found guilty of stabbing a fellow inmate to death in 1985. Sutton's lawyers in January asked the state's Republican governor, Bill Lee, to grant clemency, citing expressions of support for Sutton from prison officials.

  • A recurring Biden campaign story about being arrested in South Africa is full of inconsistencies
    The Week

    A recurring Biden campaign story about being arrested in South Africa is full of inconsistencies

    Former Vice President Joe Biden has a pretty good tale to share — but it may be a little tall. Biden, who is running for president, has been spicing up his recent campaign stump speeches with a story of how he was arrested while in South Africa trying to see Nelson Mandela, The New York Times reports. During recent campaign speeches, Biden says he "had the great honor" of meeting Mandela and "of being arrested with our U.N. ambassador on the streets of Soweto." As Miami Herald reporter Alex Daugherty points out, Soweto is a ways away from Robben Island, where Mandela's maximum security prison was located.

  • Pete Buttigieg quips he's 'a Microsoft Word guy' during Democratic debate and attracts instant Clippy comparisons
    Business Insider

    Pete Buttigieg quips he's 'a Microsoft Word guy' during Democratic debate and attracts instant Clippy comparisons

    Associated Press/Charlie Niebergall Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg quipped he was more of a "Microsoft Word guy" during Wednesday's candidates' debate in Nevada. The remark came after rival Elizabeth Warren described Buttigieg's healthcare plan as "a PowerPoint" and "not a plan." Buttigieg's quip was mocked on social media, with some Twitter users likening him to Microsoft's now-defunct "Clippy" virtual assistant.

  • Former national security adviser denounces the House's impeachment proceedings as 'grossly partisan'
    Yahoo News Video

    Former national security adviser denounces the House's impeachment proceedings as 'grossly partisan'

    Former national security adviser John Bolton on Wednesday denounced the House's impeachment proceedings against President Trump as ”grossly partisan” and said his testimony would not have changed Trump's acquittal in the Senate, as he continued to stay quiet on the details of a yet-to-be-released book.

  • California Pension Fund Does Not Deny CIO’s Involvement in China’s ‘Thousand Talents Program’
    National Review

    California Pension Fund Does Not Deny CIO’s Involvement in China’s ‘Thousand Talents Program’

    The CEO of California's public pension fund said Representative Jim Banks (R., Ind. had made “baseless accusations” about the fund's chief investment officer being involved in Chinese espionage — but did not deny that Yu Ben Meng had been recruited to the “Thousand Talents Program. Marcie Frost, the head of California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS), also admitted that her organization — the largest public pension fund in the country with “approximately $400 billion in global assets — had increased its Chinese investments in 2019 after shifts in “well-established indexes.

  • 'American voters should decide American elections - not Putin': Trump accused of threatening democracy after fresh warnings over Russian interference
    The Independent

    'American voters should decide American elections - not Putin': Trump accused of threatening democracy after fresh warnings over Russian interference

    US intelligence officials warned Congress that Russia plans to interfere in 2020 Democratic elections and challenges in November, but officials in Moscow are dismissing the allegations as "paranoid" while Washington leaders condemn Donald Trump's reported efforts to dismiss the threat. Following a 13 February briefing to the House Intelligence Committee, the president reportedly berated the national intelligence director for allowing the hearing to take place, which allowed his Democratic impeachment foes to hear testimony about foreign interference similar to the Russian efforts at the centre of an investigation in 2016. According to the New York Times, the president's allies defended Mr Trump at the hearing as acting intelligence director Joseph Maguire laid out Russian plans to sow chaos and undermine US elections through social media and cyber attacks, among other tools, intended to disrupt the electoral process and stir division among voters preparing to elect the next president and other seats across the US.

  • Family of man killed by trooper seeking more than $10M
    Associated Press

    Family of man killed by trooper seeking more than $10M

    Relatives of a black Connecticut man killed by a state trooper are seeking more than $10 million in wrongful death damages from state and local police, according to legal notices filed Thursday. Lawyers for the family of Mubarak Soulemane, 19, asked the state claims commissioner for permission to sue the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection and top state police officials including Public Safety Commissioner James Rovella for $10 million. They also filed notice with the town of West Haven that they intend to sue the town and local police officials for an undisclosed amount of money.

  • CDC is preparing for the 'likely' spread of coronavirus in the US, officials say
    USA TODAY

    CDC is preparing for the 'likely' spread of coronavirus in the US, officials say

    Health experts sounded the alarm Friday over the worldwide threat of the coronavirus, with officials warning of its "likely" community spread in the United States and the World Health Organization cautioning that "the window of opportunity is narrowing" for containing the outbreak worldwide. The COVID-19 coronavirus, which erupted in China in December, has killed at least 2,360 people and sickened at least 77,900 worldwide, the majority of cases in mainland China. Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told reporters Friday that U.S. health officials are preparing for the coronavirus to become a pandemic.

  • Reuters

    Archaeologists unveil possible shrine to Rome's first king

    Archaeologists said on Friday they had discovered an ancient cenotaph that almost certainly commemorated the legendary founder of Rome, Romulus, buried in the heart of the Italian capital. The small chamber containing a simple sarcophagus and round stone block was originally found at the start of the last century beneath the Capitoline Hill inside the old Roman forum. Alfonsina Russo, the head of the Colosseum Archaeological Park, said the site probably dated back to the sixth century BC, and was located in the most ancient part of the city which was directly linked in historical texts to Rome's first king.

  • Airport worker with no license takes plane for spin near D.C., almost crashes, feds say
    NBC News

    Airport worker with no license takes plane for spin near D.C., almost crashes, feds say

    A Virginia man piloted at least one plane without a license in 2018, in a dangerous journey that ended with a "bounced" landing, federal authorities said. Ryan Guy Parker "knowingly and willfully" flew above suburban Washington D.C., posing a "significant risk of injury and death" to himself and the public, according to an affidavit by U.S. Department of Transportation Special Agent Bret Stolle. In a Sept. 27, 2018 trip out of Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Parker nearly crashed on touch down, Stolle wrote.

  • What Happens If Joe Biden Flops in Nevada?
    The National Interest

    What Happens If Joe Biden Flops in Nevada?

    Tomorrow is the Nevada caucus, the third contest in the Democratic presidential primaries following Iowa and New Hampshire. The first state that is not overwhelmingly white, Nevada's results will broaden the perspective on the Democratic field and determine the narrative of who will continue to be viable. The latest poll from Nevada, conducted by Emerson College, has Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont in first place with 30%.

  • More than 100 wild animals in China died from poisoning in a mass die-off seemingly triggered by coronavirus disinfectant
    Business Insider

    More than 100 wild animals in China died from poisoning in a mass die-off seemingly triggered by coronavirus disinfectant

    STR/AFP via Getty Images More than 100 wild animals were found dead in a Chinese megacity and tests show that they were poisoned by the disinfectant that's being used to combat the coronavirus. At least 17 species of animals, including wild boar, weasels, and blackbirds, were affected by the mass die-off. Nanchong Stray Animal Rescue claims that authorities are killing domesticated animals outright amid fears that they can spread the coronavirus.

  • Bear strolling around California city sparks media feeding frenzy
    The Week

    Bear strolling around California city sparks media feeding frenzy

    It's not that unusual to find bears wandering around towns and cities across the U.S., especially when those cities are right next to the hills where those bears live. But one not-so-unusually lumbering around Monrovia, California, on Thursday and Friday has sparked some atypical curiosity in the bear-friendly city. The large, nameless bear has been spotted slowly making his way through yards and blocking traffic since Thursday night, not doing much besides sniffing out trash.

  • China is offering families of doctors who died fighting the coronavirus a 'sympathy payment' of $716
    INSIDER

    China is offering families of doctors who died fighting the coronavirus a 'sympathy payment' of $716

    Chinese healthcare workers are on the frontlines of battling the coronavirus outbreak and several have lost their lives to the virus. On Monday, the government announced that it will pay $716 to families of healthcare providers who have died, Shanghaiist reported. Chinese healthcare providers are on the frontlines of the coronavirus outbreak, and several have lost their lives trying to save others.

  • Coronavirus: Princess Cruises boss under fire for blowing kisses at ship where two have died and 3,000 have been quarantined for weeks
    The Independent

    Coronavirus: Princess Cruises boss under fire for blowing kisses at ship where two have died and 3,000 have been quarantined for weeks

    The president of Princess Cruises welcomed a coronavirus-quarantined ship by blowing kisses and making heart signs, captured on a video set to upbeat music and posted on social media the same day as reports of the deaths of two passengers had surfaced. In a video posted to the company's social media on Wednesday, Jan Swartz is seen wearing a surgical mask and forming heart hands over her head as the cruise ship finally begins to disembark after its passengers were forced to remain at a port in Yokohama, Japan for several weeks following a shipwide outbreak of the flu-like respiratory virus. On Wednesday, officials with the Japanese Ministry of Health confirmed the on-board deaths of an 87-year-old man and an 84-year-old woman, both stricken with the latest coronavirus that has claimed more than 2,000 lives and sickened thousands of others around the globe.

  • Police: Couple forced boys off road, angered by Trump flags
    Associated Press

    Police: Couple forced boys off road, angered by Trump flags

    A northwestern Indiana couple allegedly used a car to force two teenage boys off a road, angered that the twin brothers were riding bicycles adorned with flags supporting President Donald Trump, before ripping one of the sibling's flag from his bike, police said Friday. Hobart police said Snapchat videos helped officers secure charges against Kyren Gregory Perry-Jones, 23, and Cailyn Marie Smith, 18, in connection with a July 22 incident. Police Capt. James Gonzales said the Hobart couple are accused of driving in their car, running the 14-year-old boys off of the road, and making threats toward them.

  • Coronavirus: CDC issues new travel notices for Hong Kong, Japan
    USA TODAY

    Coronavirus: CDC issues new travel notices for Hong Kong, Japan

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new advisories on Wednesday for travelers going to Hong Kong and Japan in the wake of the deadly coronavirus spreading across the world. The advisories are notably only a "level 1," a "watch," meaning travelers should exercise "usual precautions," unlike the "level 3" issued for China Jan. 27, which warns to "avoid nonessential travel." China's "level 3" advisory excludes Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan.

  • U.S. prepares for coronavirus pandemic, school and business closures: health officials
    Reuters

    U.S. prepares for coronavirus pandemic, school and business closures: health officials

    U.S. health officials on Friday said they are preparing for the possibility of the spread of the new coronavirus through U.S. communities that would force closures of schools and businesses. The United States has yet to see community spread of the virus that emerged in central China in December. But health authorities are preparing medical personnel for the risk, Nancy Messonnier, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) told reporters on a conference call.

  • Execution for a Facebook post? Why blasphemy is a capital offense in some Muslim countries
    The Conversation

    Execution for a Facebook post? Why blasphemy is a capital offense in some Muslim countries

    Junaid Hafeez, a university lecturer in Pakistan, had been imprisoned for six years when he was sentenced to death in December 2019. Pakistan has the world's second strictest blasphemy laws after Iran, according to U.S. Commision on International Religious Freedom. Hafeez, whose death sentence is under appeal, is one of about 1,500 Pakistanis charged with blasphemy, or sacrilegious speech, over the last three decades.

  • This Could Be Iran's Next Ruler (Or King?)
    The National Interest

    This Could Be Iran's Next Ruler (Or King?)

    Key point: Pahlavi's vision is one of nonviolent resistance to Iran's clerical regime. Over the past few weeks, the Trump administration has turned up the heat on Tehran. Way up.