Black executives urge fight on voting limits

It’s the toughest corporate pushback yet against Georgia’s new voting law…

Dozens of prominent Black executives have joined forces and are calling on other U.S. companies to take a stand against restrictions to voting rights in Georgia, as well as similar laws being pursued across the country.

The campaign - announced Wednesday - is being led by Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier and former American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault,

...Who told Reuters (quote) “We’re calling on corporate America to publicly oppose any discriminatory legislation and all measures designed to limit Americans' ability to vote.”

The Republican-backed Georgia law - signed last week - strengthened ID requirements for absentee ballots, shortened early voting periods for runoff elections and made it a misdemeanor for people to offer food and water to voters waiting in line.

Civil rights groups have launched legal fights against the new law, arguing the measures are intended to make it harder for people – especially Black people – to vote.

Atlanta-based Coca-Cola and Delta Airlines are facing boycott calls from activists who say they need to do more to oppose the law.

Coca-Cola has said it was disappointed with the outcome in Georgia and would press for improvements to election laws.

Delta Chief Executive Ed Bastian, who had praised aspects of the Republican-backed law, on Wednesday took a tougher stand against it, saying in a memo to employees:

"I need to make it crystal clear that the final bill is unacceptable and does not match Delta’s values."

Video Transcript

- It's the toughest corporate pushback yet against Georgia's new voting law. Dozens of prominent Black executives have joined forces and are calling on other US companies to take a stand against restrictions to voting rights in Georgia, as well as similar laws being pursued across the country. The campaign announced Wednesday is being led by Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier and former American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault, who told Reuters, quote, "We're calling on corporate America to publicly oppose any discriminatory legislation and all measures designed to limit Americans' ability to vote."

The Republican-backed Georgia law signed last week strengthened ID requirements for absentee ballots, shortened early voting periods for runoff elections, and made it a misdemeanor for people to offer food and water to voters waiting in line. Civil rights groups have launched legal fights against the new law, arguing the measures are intended to make it harder for people, especially Black people, to vote.

Atlanta-based Coca-Cola and Delta Airlines are facing boycott calls from activists who say they need to do more to oppose the law. Coca-Cola has said it was disappointed with the outcome in Georgia and would press for improvements to election laws. Delta Chief Executive Ed Bastian, who had praised aspects of the Republican-backed law on Wednesday, took a tougher stand against it, saying in a memo to employees, "I need to make it crystal clear that the final bill is unacceptable and does not match Delta's values."