Black Tennessee Voices LIVE show coming Sept. 20 to National Museum of African American Music

·2 min read

From The Tennessean's newsroom comes "Black Tennessee Voices LIVE," a new storytelling show concept spotlighting the unique, personal, and powerful stories of Black Tennesseans.

The Tennessean newsroom has selected six marvelous storytellers from Middle Tennessee's rich Black community, who will share their stories on stage in an inaugural show at the iconic National Museum of African American Music's Roots Theater in downtown Nashville on Tuesday, Sept. 20

The show concept stems from The Tennessean's Black Tennessee Voices initiative. Founded and curated by the outlet's opinion and engagement reporter LeBron Hill, the initiative hosts a newsletter, private and public Facebook pages, and an Instagram page.

The show will be co-hosted by Hill and fellow opinion and engagement reporter Kyra Watts.

The Tennessean presents "Black Tennessee Voices LIVE, " a storytelling show coming Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022, to the National Museum of African American Music in downtown Nashville.
The Tennessean presents "Black Tennessee Voices LIVE, " a storytelling show coming Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022, to the National Museum of African American Music in downtown Nashville.

Stories straight from those who've lived them

The show spotlights six Middle Tennessee stories for Black Tennessee Voices' first-ever live show. Hear stories directly from the people who've lived them.

The Lineup

  • Since 2020, Pulaski, Tenn. native Keidron Turner, a 19-year-old senior at Belmont University has stepped up to make a change in his hometown–a place well-known as the birthplace of the Ku Klux Klan–challenging residents and city leaders to consider how Confederate symbolism impacts not only him but fellow Black people across the South.

  • Brentwood mom Revida Rahman's earliest childhood memory of racism and segregation (even as late as the 1970s) in her Mississippi hometown has molded how she parents and works today, including that of her local advocacy to improve diversity and inclusion efforts at her children's school district.

  • As someone who has experienced homelessness first-hand, self-proclaimed "Homeless CEO" Kennetha Patterson, considers how the rapidly changing landscape of Nashville – like a real-life Monopoly game – runs the risk of leaving people like her behind.

  • Drawing from her experience of having several caring adults supporting her throughout her childhood, The McNeilly Center for Children's program director, Alyssa Dituro, has spent her career advocating for equitable learning for all, especially in early childhood.

  • Marisa Richmond is a professor at Middle Tennessee State University, teaching African American, LGBTQ, and political histories. Richmond's life has been centered around advocacy for Black and Trans communities. 

  • Diversity and Inclusion director for Metro Nashville Public Schools, Ashford Hughes, is a Knoxville native with a fruitful career in local public service who uses his platform to teach and uplift Black and brown communities.

The Tennessean presents "Black Tennessee Voices LIVE, " a storytelling show coming Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022, to the National Museum of African American Music's Roots Theater in downtown Nashville.
The Tennessean presents "Black Tennessee Voices LIVE, " a storytelling show coming Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022, to the National Museum of African American Music's Roots Theater in downtown Nashville.

Buy tickets, today!

Admission for the show is $10, with the inclusion of refreshments to be provided during a reception before showtime at 7 p.m.

To purchase tickets to Black Tennessee Voices LIVE, visit https://storytellersproject.enmotive.com/events/register/storytellers-project-nashville-tn.

For any inquiries regarding BTV Live, contact show leads LeBron Hill (lhill@tennessean.com) or Anika Exum (aexum@tennessean.com). Call Anika at 615-347-7313.

This article originally appeared on Nashville Tennessean: Save the date: Black Tennessee Voices LIVE show coming Sept. 20