Bachmann says she isn’t running to judge gays

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

One day after winning the Iowa straw poll, Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann hedged on NBC's "Meet the Press" when host David Gregory asked about her past criticism of homosexuality.

Gregory played a 2004 clip of Bachmann addressing the National Education Conference when she stated that being gay is "a very sad life."

"It's part of Satan, I think, to say that this is 'gay.' It's anything but 'gay.'" She also stated that the gay lifestyle is "bondage" that leads to "personal enslavement of individuals" and is "dangerous." But she also encouraged compassion for those dealing with what she identifies as a "sexual dysfunction."

Gregory asked if these would be Bachmann's views on gays were she to win the presidency. But she dodged the question, saying "Well, I am running for the presidency of the United States. I am not running to be anyone's judge."

Gregory pressed Bachmann, suggesting that she has, in fact, judged gays. But the congresswoman defended herself, saying of gays "I don't judge them," and adding that she accords "honor and dignity" to every person.

She also avoided Gregory's questions regarding how she believes gay Americans will react to statements such as the ones she made in 2004 to the National Education Conference. She did not offer a direct answer when Gregory asked if she would appoint someone who is openly gay to her administration, cabinet or as a federal judge, saying her litmus test for appointees would be an assessment of their constitutional principles.

Bachmann stressed her opposition to gay marriage during the interview but would not offer an opinion of a family with two gay parents.

You can watch the exchange between Gregory and Bachmann, below via NBC:

Bachmann and her husband, Marcus Bachmann, run a Christian counseling business that offers "reparative" therapy for homosexuality, which backers believe can "cure" people of being gay. Marcus Bachmann stressed that the facility only offers "reparative" therapy if a client requests that type of treatment.

Bachmann's hedging Sunday demonstrates the careful line she will be walking during the 2012 campaign to extend her national appeal while continuing to try to amass support from the conservative right.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting