Boeing 737 MAX flies again with media onboard

Boeing’s 737 MAX on Wednesday returned to the skies… with media onboard… in its first public flight since being grounded last year after two fatal crashes.

The American Airlines flight from Dallas, Texas to Tulsa, Oklahoma was part of a concerted PR effort to restore the jet’s image following a 20-month ban.. and for American Airlines to demonstrate the jet’s safety ahead of the first commercial flight set for December 29.

Boeing's best-selling jet was grounded in March 2019 after crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people, marking the industry's worst safety crisis in decades.

On Wednesday - journalists in face coverings witnessed a comeback.

It was the first time anyone besides regulators and industry personnel have flown on the MAX since the grounding - one that ignited investigations focusing on software that overwhelmed pilots.

Critical for Boeing’s reputation and hard-hit finances - the FAA last month cleared the jet to fly again, following design changes and training upgrades.

But families of some victims have protested the MAX’s return to service before a final investigative report on the second crash has been released.

Video Transcript

- Boeing's 737 MAX on Wednesday returned to the skies, with media onboard, in its first public flight since being grounded last year after two fatal crashes.

- The American Airlines flight from Dallas, Texas to Tulsa, Oklahoma was part of a concerted PR effort to restore the jet's image following a 20 month ban, and for American Airlines to demonstrate the jet's safety, ahead of the first commercial flight set for December 29.

- Boeing's best selling jet was grounded in March 2019, after crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people, marking the industry's worst safety crisis in decades.

- On Wednesday, journalists in face coverings witnessed a comeback. It was the first time anyone besides regulators and industry personnel, have flown on the MAX since the grounding, one that ignited investigations focusing on software that overwhelmed pilots.

- Critical for Boeing's reputation and hard hit finances, the FAA last month cleared the jet to fly again, following design changes and training upgrades. But families of some victims have protested the MAX's return to service before a final investigative report on the second crash has been released.