The Boston Globe endorses Elizabeth Warren. So does Ann Coulter, kind of.

Peter Weber

The Boston Globe editorial board endorsed hometown Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) for president on Wednesday, less that a week before Massachusetts holds its primary on Super Tuesday, and they drew back the curtain and explained why in a video.

"Every Democrat wants to know who can beat Donald Trump," and "any of the top six Democratic primary candidates would make a better president than the current occupant of the White House," the Globe editorial board said (they also endorsed William Weld over Trump). "But one candidate stands out as a leader with the qualifications, the track record, and the tenacity to defend the principles of democracy, bring fairness to an economy that is excluding too many Americans, and advance a progressive agenda. She would fight the corruption and corporate influence that distort our politics, lift up working families, and combat gun violence and climate change. That candidate is Elizabeth Warren."

What really set Warren apart from the Democratic frontrunner, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), is that Sanders is "less likely to deliver" the "profound changes" both candidates seek to enact, the editorial board explained. "Warren is uniquely poised to accomplish serious reform without sacrificing what's working in our economy and innovation ecosystem. She would get under the hood to fix the engine — not drive off a cliff, but also not just kick the tires."

Oddly, that's essentially the same argument conservative provocateur Ann Coulter made after Tuesday night's debate: "Sen. Warren has convinced me that Bernie isn't that worrisome. He'll never get anything done. SHE'S the freak who will show up with 17 idiotic plans every day and keep everyone up until it gets done."



"No one should expect the same Warren who can bring the fight to Trump to be fully embraced by the entire country," the Globe editorial board shrugged, "but her candidacy would be bolstered by showing more of her capacity to unite the party and yes, even the polarized factions of our society."

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