Boy, 2, dies after tree falls onto home during powerful California storm

Liu Guanguan

A 2-year-old boy was among at least two people killed as a storm swept through California, knocking down trees, flooding streets and leaving thousands in the dark.

The child, who has not been publicly identified, was sitting on a living room couch Wednesday evening when the tree crashed through the roof of the mobile home in Occidental, "pinning or landing" on top of him, a Sonoma County sheriff’s spokesperson said.

The boy's father and a neighbor were able to free him. Fire personnel performed CPR, but the boy was pronounced dead from his injuries just before 6 p.m.

The sheriff's spokesperson said the boy's parents were home at the time and did not report any injuries.

In Fairfield, a 19-year-old woman was killed in a single-vehicle collision around 8:40 a.m. Wednesday. Police said the woman was driving down a partly flooded road when the car she was in hydroplaned and crashed into a utility pole.

"Unfortunately, speed unsafe for conditions was likely the primary reason for the collision, with water on the road being a contributing factor," Fairfield police said.

Her name was not released.

Parts of California were hit by heavy rain, strong winds and flooding that left thousands of people in the dark. There had been more than 190,000 households and businesses without power Wednesday night but by late Thursday that number was around 66,000, according to tracking website Poweroutage.us.

Authorities in San Francisco on Wednesday responded to reports of downed trees. A family was trapped in a vehicle after a tree toppled over. They were rescued and are OK, the fire department said.

Multiple downed trees almost completely blocked Interstate 280 in San Mateo Country, said the California Highway Patrol, which urged drivers to avoid the area.

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In Santa Cruz County, there was heavy damage to piers in Capitola and Seacliff, the county government said, and high tides and large surf prompted warnings for people to stay away.

Santa Cruz police tweeted the worst was over, but urged people to avoid coastlines and damaged areas. There were multiple road closures Thursday, city police said.

Further east in the Sierra Nevada, heavy snow fell Thursday. The National Weather Service in Reno, Nevada, warned travelers against attempting Interstate 80 between Soda Springs and Truckee.

Part of State Route 203 in the mountains was closed after vehicle spinouts that blocked the roadway, but it was later reopened, according to the California Department of Transportation. U.S. 395 in Mono County had also been closed due to snow and wind, but later reopened.

This article was originally published on NBCNews.com